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Today I opened one of Microsoft' .Net regex implementations and it hit me that this may be the only reason for the existence of the goto statement in a language like C# (which puts major emphasis on the 'clarity for the developer' concept where goto seems to have no place at all) and possibly also the sole reason why Microsoft use it the CLR libraries implementations - for performance boosts. I also remember seeing similar optimization in the Microsoft's ASP.NET page/control rendering in System.Web.UI.dll as well. Would that be a valid (or documented maybe ?) assumption to make? Have you seen it used by Microsoft under any other circumstances except to improve code execution time? Thanks.

Below is an excerpt (NOT MEANT TO EXAMINED IN DETAIL JUST SCAN OVER IT) from Microsoft's own regex implementation where they again use goto extensively for what appears to be only performance boost:

public override void Go() 
{
    int num4;
    int num5;
    string runtext = base.runtext;
    int runtextstart = base.runtextstart;
    int runtextbeg = base.runtextbeg;
    int runtextend = base.runtextend;
    int runtextpos = base.runtextpos;
    int[] runtrack = base.runtrack;
    int runtrackpos = base.runtrackpos;
    int[] runstack = base.runstack;
    int runstackpos = base.runstackpos;
    runtrack[--runtrackpos] = runtextpos;
    runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 0;
    runstack[--runstackpos] = runtextpos;
    runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 1;
    if ((((runtextpos != base.runtextstart) || 
       (4 > (runtextend - runtextpos))) || 
       ((runtext[runtextpos] != '<') || 
       (runtext[runtextpos + 1] != '%'))) || 
       ((runtext[runtextpos + 2] != '-') || 
       (runtext[runtextpos + 3] != '-')))
    {
        goto Label_02F8;
    }
    runtextpos += 4;
    runstack[--runstackpos] = -1;
    runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 1;
    goto Label_0213;
Label_0161:
    if (num5 > num4)
    {
        runtrack[--runtrackpos] = (num5 - num4) - 1;
        runtrack[--runtrackpos] = runtextpos - 1;
        runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 2;
    }
Label_0194:
    num4 = runstack[runstackpos++];
    this.Capture(2, num4, runtextpos);
    runtrack[--runtrackpos] = num4;
    runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 3;
    if (runtextpos >= runtextend)
    {
        goto Label_02F8;
    }
    runtextpos++;
    if (runtext[runtextpos] != '-')
    {
        goto Label_02F8;
    }
    num4 = runstack[runstackpos++];
    this.Capture(1, num4, runtextpos);
    runtrack[--runtrackpos] = num4;
    runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 3;
Label_0213:
    if (num4 != -1)
    {
        runtrack[--runtrackpos] = num4;
    }
    else
    {
        runtrack[--runtrackpos] = runtextpos;
    }
    if ((num4 = runstack[runstackpos++]) != runtextpos)
    {
        runtrack[--runtrackpos] = runtextpos;
        runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 4;
    }
    else
    {
        runstack[--runstackpos] = num4;
        runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 5;
    }
    if (((3 > (runtextend - runtextpos)) || 
    (runtext[runtextpos] != '-')) || 
    ((runtext[runtextpos + 1] != '%') || 
    (runtext[runtextpos + 2] != '>')))
    {
        goto Label_02F8;
    }
    runtextpos += 3;
    num4 = runstack[runstackpos++];
    this.Capture(0, num4, runtextpos);
    runtrack[--runtrackpos] = num4;
    runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 3;
Label_02EF:
    base.runtextpos = runtextpos;
    return;
Label_02F8:
    base.runtrackpos = runtrackpos;
    base.runstackpos = runstackpos;
    this.EnsureStorage();
    runtrackpos = base.runtrackpos;
    runstackpos = base.runstackpos;
    runtrack = base.runtrack;
    runstack = base.runstack;
    switch (runtrack[runtrackpos++])
    {
        case 1:
            runstackpos++;
            goto Label_02F8;

        case 2:
            runtextpos = runtrack[runtrackpos++];
            num4 = runtrack[runtrackpos++];
            if (num4 > 0)
            {
                runtrack[--runtrackpos] = num4 - 1;
                runtrack[--runtrackpos] = runtextpos - 1;
                runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 2;
            }
            goto Label_0194;

        case 3:
            runstack[--runstackpos] = runtrack[runtrackpos++];
            this.Uncapture();
            goto Label_02F8;

        case 4:
            runtextpos = runtrack[runtrackpos++];
            runstack[--runstackpos] = runtextpos;
            runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 5;
            if ((runtrackpos > 40) && (runstackpos > 30))
            {
                runstack[--runstackpos] = runtextpos;
                runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 1;
                runstack[--runstackpos] = runtextpos;
                runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 1;
                num4 = (num5 = runtextend - runtextpos) + 1;
                do
                {
                    if (--num4 <= 0)
                    {
                        goto Label_0161;
                    }
                    runtextpos++;
                }
                while (runtext[runtextpos] != '-');
                runtextpos--;
                goto Label_0161;
            }
            runtrack[--runtrackpos] = 6;
            goto Label_02F8;

        case 5:
            runstack[runstackpos] = runtrack[runtrackpos++];
            goto Label_02F8;
    }
    runtextpos = runtrack[runtrackpos++];
    goto Label_02EF;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Based on the labels, this is definitely decompiled IL. Decompilers can have a difficult time reconstructing high-level control flow blocks from IL, and will often use gotos to represent the IL-level branch instructions (which are most often the result of control flow blocks). So your answer is that performance of the original code and this decompiled code will be identical, as they have identical IL representations. – cdhowie Jan 28 '11 at 21:11
    
I think the source-code of most .net libraries is available for download(using the rather restrictive MS-reference license). You can check there how the original constructs looked like. – CodesInChaos Jan 28 '11 at 21:14
    
Also, the existence of goto is well-validated for clarity reasons. Consider that you cannot, for example, break out of multiple levels of nested loops. goto may be your only option, short of rewriting your loops to read like complete crap in exchange for avoiding the use of goto. The performance argument is actually quite weak. – cdhowie Jan 28 '11 at 21:17
    
To be clear, this is generated code, right? Not a part of the RegEx class but from a 'compiled' RegEx generated by a related class . – Henk Holterman Jan 28 '11 at 21:24
    
thanks for the explanation cdhowie. But in imo if you can't break out a nested loops something is wrong with your design, more over more then 2-3 levels of nested loops are very very bad in likely all cases where one should definetly re-evaluate 'the big picture' and come back and rewrite the code. – John G. Jan 28 '11 at 21:24
up vote 5 down vote accepted

One use-case I see is auto-generated code. The high-level control flow constructs are easy for us humans, but not necessarily convenient as output of code generation algorithms.

And is your code decompiled? In that case it might just be written in a way that the decompiler can't deal with without using gotos. On IL level all control flow constructs are translated to gotos, and the decompiler tries to guess what they were. And in complicated cases it might not figure out a good way to represent it using high-level constructs and thus resorts to gotos.

Another use-case are state-machines. You have a number of states, and after each one it can transit to a new state using goto statements. Parsers are a common application of state-machines.

share|improve this answer
1  
Technically, on the IL level control flow constructs are translated to branches, not gotos. goto is a C# language keyword. In IL, the relevant opcodes are brtrue, brfalse, and br. – cdhowie Jan 28 '11 at 21:13
    
"You have a number of states" - oh yes you are right, I remember seeing them in IEnumerable generated code as well. – John G. Jan 28 '11 at 21:15
    
@cdhowie: branches, gotos, what's in a name? We coders aren't too bright sometimes. Structured programming came along some decades ago, and to get coders to hop on it, some magazine editor blared "gotos considered harmful", and the rest of us are just "Yeah - what he said!". They're no more harmful, or slower, or faster, than the branch instructions the machines can't live without. – Mike Dunlavey Jan 28 '11 at 21:24
    
@Mike: I'm only trying to provide clarity and information. It's not like I downvoted the answer because of the terminology. – cdhowie Jan 28 '11 at 21:28
    
@cdhowie: Sorry, the comment closed before I was finished typing it. – Mike Dunlavey Jan 28 '11 at 21:29

OK, this is a question about generated code, and has no real bearing on why C# has a goto statement.

And not only is it generated, it is code generated for a state machine (DFA). And even hand-written state machines will use goto's sometimes.

To answer the title question: No, goto is there for backward compatibility and to address small corner cases like nested loops (getting out of), and for example state machines. It has little or nothing to do with performance.

share|improve this answer
    
"It has little or nothing to do with performance." I am not entirely sure about that as goto skips over code which would be difficult to write otherwise. Also what do you mean "backward compatibility" ? A computer can only do jumps aka goto - it's has no other means of accessing the memory which is out of the current sequence. It's been like this since the beginning of computers and I suspect it will be this way for a long time to come – John G. Jan 28 '11 at 21:40
    
@John: 2, backward: C# is to some degree backward compatible with C and even C++. Not fully though. 1, Performance: You can't really tell from high level code. Most optimization is in the JIT, and then there is a pipelined Pentium. You have very little control. – Henk Holterman Jan 28 '11 at 22:07
    
Henk Holterman: thanks, I see what you mean now. "You have very little control" yes unless wanna write the asm code yourself and get even worse performance most of the time but still have no control over the kernel functions required to be called so in other words - "You have very little control" – John G. Jan 28 '11 at 22:28
    
@John: also make very sure you understand what I meant with "pipelined Pentium". The rise of the P4 negated or reversed many old optimization tricks. – Henk Holterman Jan 28 '11 at 22:31
    
Henk Holterman, yes I'm quite aware of what pipelineing is but I'm not sure what the improvements in P4 have to do with this question. More over optimizations are so hardware manufacturer - OS manufacturer related that it's not funny. for instance Where is the fastcall windows function stored ? in a special memory, hm because MS paid Intel to work with them – John G. Jan 28 '11 at 22:39

You are seeing goto as a result of the decompile process. In this case it is missing translations of if/else-scopes. The decompile process is not a 1-1 translation so the decompiler often can't translate it correctly. .Net uses goto heavily as it is the only way for MSIL/machine code to move around. In the lowest level it is jumping between memory addresses playing with the stack.

For us mortal developers it is ok to avoid it as we have scoped commands that can do what we need. A while (true) { } is actually just translated to "if (true) goto someaddress" and at the end of the scope "goto that ifaddressupthere", so there is very little or no performance to gain from using goto directly.

I have been writing some assembly rewriting thingie using Mono.Cecil so I have some experience with looking at my code in Reflector and MSIL. The compiled code is in most cases pretty well optimized.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this is true, at assembly level yes the jumps are the only way to get around (but not MSIL as it's a very higher abstraction) but how would you explain that sometimes goto is not generated and sometimes it is ? I think it maybe only generate goto when unrolling loops and code which are obvious that can be skipped. In which case the perfromnace is the reason. – John G. Jan 28 '11 at 21:20
1  
@John The C# compiler translates all loops into the equivalent of goto when compiling to IL since IL doesn't know loops. It only knows conditional and unconditional branches. – CodesInChaos Jan 28 '11 at 21:46
1  
MSIL is the assembly language for .Net. It can nice stuff like goto, call, callvirt and pinvoke. It can't do stuff like while, do, select, for, foreach and yield. These are language specific features and are translated to a whole set of gotos when the compiler compiles from your language of choice to MSIL. (ok, actually yield is a whole separate deal ... for a good time have a look at MSIL code from yield statements.) – Tedd Hansen Jan 28 '11 at 21:46
    
Tedd Hansen , I don't know if yield is special really, it's just comes with its own generated class which again translates in IL as a normal loop would do so I'd say from IL stand of point there is no difference. What different do you see ? I see same IL when conditinal branching is required as any other non-generated code. No true coroutine in C# to make any difference or have different opcodes to support fibers or other fanciness. Or at least I'm unaware of such. – John G. Jan 28 '11 at 22:32

There are a few cases where goto increases readability of code, like break out of nested loops.

Item item = null;
foreach(var a in A)
{
    foreach(var b in a.B)
    {
        if (b.foo == someCondition)
        {
            item = b.item;
            goto AfterLoop;
        }
    }
}
AfterLoop:

Without goto you need a lot of if (hasFound) {break;} kind of code.

share|improve this answer

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