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Does the .Last() extension method take into account if it's called on an IList? I'm just wondering if there's a significant performance difference between these:

IList<int> numbers = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

int lastNumber1 = numbers.Last();
int lastNumber2 = numbers[numbers.Count-1];

Intuition tells me that the first alternative is O(n) but the second is O(1). Is .Last() "smart" enough to try casting it to an IList?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Probably not, as it can do list[list.count-1]

Verified by reflector:

public static TSource Last<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }
    IList<TSource> list = source as IList<TSource>;
    if (list != null)
    {
        int count = list.Count;
        if (count > 0)
        {
            return list[count - 1];
        }
    }
    ...
}
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2  
Thanks. What I really learned is I'm a nut for not having .NET Reflector installed, after all this time. :) –  Scott Whitlock Jan 28 '11 at 21:35

This is an undocumented optimization, but the predicate-less overload of Enumerable.Last does indeed skip straight to the end.

Note that the overload with a predicate doesn't just go from the end, working backwards as you might expect - it goes forwards from the start. I believe this is to avoid inconsistency when the predicate may throw an exception (or cause other side effects).

See my blog post about implementing First/Last/Single etc for more information - and an inconsistency which is present between the overloads of Single/SingleOrDefault.

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That's a good extra point. I would also expect they do that because the predicate could cause side effects (other than throwing exceptions). –  Scott Whitlock Jan 28 '11 at 21:36
    
@Scott: True. Have edited to include that. On the other hand, the indexer/iterators could have side-effects too... it's all a bit of a mess :( –  Jon Skeet Jan 28 '11 at 21:37
    
wow, I didn't think about that. If you think about it, even if a predicate does lazy evaluation, you don't want it to evaluate all of them... that's the point of lazy evaluation. You're right, it's a real mess. –  Scott Whitlock Jan 28 '11 at 21:42

Reflector:

public static TSource Last<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
{
    ...
    if (list != null)
    {
        int count = list.Count;
        if (count > 0)
        {
            return list[count - 1];
        }
    }
    else
    {
        using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            ...
        }
    }
    throw Error.NoElements();
}
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Answer: Yes.

Here's a neat way to find out:

class MyList<T> : IList<T> { 
    private readonly List<T> list = new List<T>();
    public T this[int index] {
        get {
            Console.WriteLine("Inside indexer!");
            return list[index];
        }
        set {
            list[index] = value;
        }
    }

    public void Add(T item) {
        this.list.Add(item);
    }

    public int Count {
        get {
            Console.WriteLine("Inside Count!");
            return this.list.Count;
        }
    }

    // all other IList<T> interface members throw NotImplementedException
}

Then:

MyList<int> list = new MyList<int>();
list.Add(1);
list.Add(2);
Console.WriteLine(list.Last());

Output:

Inside Count!
Inside indexer!
2

If you try this:

Console.WriteLine(list.Last(n => n % 2 == 0));

then you get an exception in GetEnumerator showing that it is trying to walk the list. If we implement GetEnumerator via

public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator() {
    Console.WriteLine("Inside GetEnumerator");
    return this.list.GetEnumerator();
}

and try again we see

Inside GetEnumerator!
2

on the console showing that the indexer was never used.

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Original poster is talking about an interface, not the implementation.

So it depends on the the underlying implementation behind the IList/Ilist<T> in question. You don't how how its indexer is implemented. I believe the framework's List<T> has a concrete implementation that utilizes an array, so a direct lookup is possible, but if all you have is an reference to IList<T>, that is not a given by any means.

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Technically true, but since the IList interface contains an indexer, it would stand to reason that in most cases list[i] would be o(1) (direct access) –  Ohad Schneider Jan 28 '11 at 23:59
1  
So...something that looks like an array is an array? I think not. Don't confuse interface with implementation. It's safe to say that some of the standard framework classes that implement IList<T> are O(1), but that's a far cry from making a blanket assertion. Without knowing something about implementation details, you can't say anything about the question as posed, with the caveat that, for his example, where the backing implementation is an array, it's a safe bet Last() will give you O(1). –  Nicholas Carey Jan 29 '11 at 0:54
    
speaks the truth here. There are at least as many implementations of IList<T> that are not O(1) as there implementations that are O(1). For any implementation that is O(1) I can just wrap it in a class that implements IList<T> and sleeps for an amount of time that proportional to n (here n is the Count). There are lots of really bad implementations of IList<T>. You can argue all you want that these aren't realistic but the point is that they exist, and they negate any assertion that IList<T> is O(1) random access. –  Jason Jan 29 '11 at 1:36
1  
The larger point is that interfaces are about what methods you can invoke, but there is no implicit contract about the implementation details. Just because someone hands you a something that implements IDbConnection doesn't mean it actually is an object that wraps a connection to a database. It just has methods that make it look like something that connects to a database. –  Jason Jan 29 '11 at 1:40

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