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I have been trying to recreate the MD5 algorithm on my own. I just can't seem to get the algorithm right. It seems that I have a problem on padding and endianness.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

/* F, G, H and I are basic MD5 functions.
 */
#define F(x, y, z) (((x) & (y)) | ((~x) & (z)))
#define G(x, y, z) (((x) & (z)) | ((y) & (~z)))
#define H(x, y, z) ((x) ^ (y) ^ (z))
#define I(x, y, z) ((y) ^ ((x) | (~z)))

/* ROTATE_LEFT rotates x left n bits.
 */
#define ROTATE_LEFT(x, n) (((x) << (n)) | ((x) >> (32-(n))))

/* FF, GG, HH, and II transformations for rounds 1, 2, 3, and 4.
Rotation is separate from addition to prevent recomputation.
 */
#define FF(a, b, c, d, x, s, ac) { \
 (a) += F ((b), (c), (d)) + (x) + (uint32_t)(ac); \
 (a) = ROTATE_LEFT ((a), (s)); \
 (a) += (b); \
  }
#define GG(a, b, c, d, x, s, ac) { \
 (a) += G ((b), (c), (d)) + (x) + (uint32_t)(ac); \
 (a) = ROTATE_LEFT ((a), (s)); \
 (a) += (b); \
  }
#define HH(a, b, c, d, x, s, ac) { \
 (a) += H ((b), (c), (d)) + (x) + (uint32_t)(ac); \
 (a) = ROTATE_LEFT ((a), (s)); \
 (a) += (b); \
  }
#define II(a, b, c, d, x, s, ac) { \
 (a) += I ((b), (c), (d)) + (x) + (uint32_t)(ac); \
 (a) = ROTATE_LEFT ((a), (s)); \
 (a) += (b); \
  }

#define S11 7
#define S12 12
#define S13 17
#define S14 22
#define S21 5
#define S22 9
#define S23 14
#define S24 20
#define S31 4
#define S32 11
#define S33 16
#define S34 23
#define S41 6
#define S42 10
#define S43 15
#define S44 21

void MD5_hash(uint32_t *message, uint32_t *digest) {
 const uint32_t d0 = 0x67452301;
 const uint32_t d1 = 0xEFCDAB89;
 const uint32_t d2 = 0x98BADCFE;
 const uint32_t d3 = 0x10325476;

 uint32_t a, b, c, d, *x;

 a = d0;
 b = d1;
 c = d2;
 d = d3;

 x = message;

 /* Round 1 */
 FF (a, b, c, d, x[ 0], S11, 0xd76aa478); /* 1 */
 FF (d, a, b, c, x[ 1], S12, 0xe8c7b756); /* 2 */
 FF (c, d, a, b, x[ 2], S13, 0x242070db); /* 3 */
 FF (b, c, d, a, x[ 3], S14, 0xc1bdceee); /* 4 */
 FF (a, b, c, d, x[ 4], S11, 0xf57c0faf); /* 5 */
 FF (d, a, b, c, x[ 5], S12, 0x4787c62a); /* 6 */
 FF (c, d, a, b, x[ 6], S13, 0xa8304613); /* 7 */
 FF (b, c, d, a, x[ 7], S14, 0xfd469501); /* 8 */
 FF (a, b, c, d, x[ 8], S11, 0x698098d8); /* 9 */
 FF (d, a, b, c, x[ 9], S12, 0x8b44f7af); /* 10 */
 FF (c, d, a, b, x[10], S13, 0xffff5bb1); /* 11 */
 FF (b, c, d, a, x[11], S14, 0x895cd7be); /* 12 */
 FF (a, b, c, d, x[12], S11, 0x6b901122); /* 13 */
 FF (d, a, b, c, x[13], S12, 0xfd987193); /* 14 */
 FF (c, d, a, b, x[14], S13, 0xa679438e); /* 15 */
 FF (b, c, d, a, x[15], S14, 0x49b40821); /* 16 */

 /* Round 2 */
 GG (a, b, c, d, x[ 1], S21, 0xf61e2562); /* 17 */
 GG (d, a, b, c, x[ 6], S22, 0xc040b340); /* 18 */
 GG (c, d, a, b, x[11], S23, 0x265e5a51); /* 19 */
 GG (b, c, d, a, x[ 0], S24, 0xe9b6c7aa); /* 20 */
 GG (a, b, c, d, x[ 5], S21, 0xd62f105d); /* 21 */
 GG (d, a, b, c, x[10], S22, 0x02441453); /* 22 */
 GG (c, d, a, b, x[15], S23, 0xd8a1e681); /* 23 */
 GG (b, c, d, a, x[ 4], S24, 0xe7d3fbc8); /* 24 */
 GG (a, b, c, d, x[ 9], S21, 0x21e1cde6); /* 25 */
 GG (d, a, b, c, x[14], S22, 0xc33707d6); /* 26 */
 GG (c, d, a, b, x[ 3], S23, 0xf4d50d87); /* 27 */
 GG (b, c, d, a, x[ 8], S24, 0x455a14ed); /* 28 */
 GG (a, b, c, d, x[13], S21, 0xa9e3e905); /* 29 */
 GG (d, a, b, c, x[ 2], S22, 0xfcefa3f8); /* 30 */
 GG (c, d, a, b, x[ 7], S23, 0x676f02d9); /* 31 */
 GG (b, c, d, a, x[12], S24, 0x8d2a4c8a); /* 32 */

 /* Round 3 */
 HH (a, b, c, d, x[ 5], S31, 0xfffa3942); /* 33 */
 HH (d, a, b, c, x[ 8], S32, 0x8771f681); /* 34 */
 HH (c, d, a, b, x[11], S33, 0x6d9d6122); /* 35 */
 HH (b, c, d, a, x[14], S34, 0xfde5380c); /* 36 */
 HH (a, b, c, d, x[ 1], S31, 0xa4beea44); /* 37 */
 HH (d, a, b, c, x[ 4], S32, 0x4bdecfa9); /* 38 */
 HH (c, d, a, b, x[ 7], S33, 0xf6bb4b60); /* 39 */
 HH (b, c, d, a, x[10], S34, 0xbebfbc70); /* 40 */
 HH (a, b, c, d, x[13], S31, 0x289b7ec6); /* 41 */
 HH (d, a, b, c, x[ 0], S32, 0xeaa127fa); /* 42 */
 HH (c, d, a, b, x[ 3], S33, 0xd4ef3085); /* 43 */
 HH (b, c, d, a, x[ 6], S34, 0x04881d05); /* 44 */
 HH (a, b, c, d, x[ 9], S31, 0xd9d4d039); /* 45 */
 HH (d, a, b, c, x[12], S32, 0xe6db99e5); /* 46 */
 HH (c, d, a, b, x[15], S33, 0x1fa27cf8); /* 47 */
 HH (b, c, d, a, x[ 2], S34, 0xc4ac5665); /* 48 */

 /* Round 4 */
 II (a, b, c, d, x[ 0], S41, 0xf4292244); /* 49 */
 II (d, a, b, c, x[ 7], S42, 0x432aff97); /* 50 */
 II (c, d, a, b, x[14], S43, 0xab9423a7); /* 51 */
 II (b, c, d, a, x[ 5], S44, 0xfc93a039); /* 52 */
 II (a, b, c, d, x[12], S41, 0x655b59c3); /* 53 */
 II (d, a, b, c, x[ 3], S42, 0x8f0ccc92); /* 54 */
 II (c, d, a, b, x[10], S43, 0xffeff47d); /* 55 */
 II (b, c, d, a, x[ 1], S44, 0x85845dd1); /* 56 */
 II (a, b, c, d, x[ 8], S41, 0x6fa87e4f); /* 57 */
 II (d, a, b, c, x[15], S42, 0xfe2ce6e0); /* 58 */
 II (c, d, a, b, x[ 6], S43, 0xa3014314); /* 59 */
 II (b, c, d, a, x[13], S44, 0x4e0811a1); /* 60 */
 II (a, b, c, d, x[ 4], S41, 0xf7537e82); /* 61 */
 II (d, a, b, c, x[11], S42, 0xbd3af235); /* 62 */
 II (c, d, a, b, x[ 2], S43, 0x2ad7d2bb); /* 63 */
 II (b, c, d, a, x[ 9], S44, 0xeb86d391); /* 64 */

 a += d0;
 b += d1;
 c += d2;
 d += d3;

 digest[0] = a;
 digest[1] = b;
 digest[2] = c;
 digest[3] = d;
}

int main(void) {
 uint32_t message[16], digest[4];

 message[0] = 0x61800000;
 message[1] = 0x00000000;
 message[2] = 0x00000000;
 message[3] = 0x00000000;
 message[4] = 0x00000000;
 message[5] = 0x00000000;
 message[6] = 0x00000000;
 message[7] = 0x00000000;
 message[8] = 0x00000000;
 message[9] = 0x00000000;
 message[10] = 0x00000000;
 message[11] = 0x00000000;
 message[12] = 0x00000000;
 message[13] = 0x00000000;
 message[14] = 0x08000000;
 message[15] = 0x00000000;

 digest[0] = 0x00000000;
 digest[1] = 0x00000000;
 digest[2] = 0x00000000;
 digest[3] = 0x00000000;

 MD5_hash(message, digest);

 printf("%08X %08X %08X %08X\n", digest[0], digest[1], digest[2], digest[3]);
}

The above code is my implementation. Now, my question is, how do i pad a certain message? for example, if my message is 'a', then the message is : 0x61800000...08000000000000. is this correct? (message[0] = 0x61800000 ... message[14] = 0x08000000, message[15] = 0x000000000). I think I might be wrong in my endianness or my interpretation of the padding instructions. can anyone please enlighten me?

(The output of the above code is: 5058CD0E 2476E559 CF86AEA4 8A173599);

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1  
MD5 is deprecated. why are you trying to use it? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MD5 –  Mitch Wheat Jan 29 '11 at 1:29
    
btw, i am using windows x64 platform, if that matters. –  John dela Cruz Jan 29 '11 at 1:30
    
I just want to try and implement it using CUDA. But before that, I need to just make it work using basic C. –  John dela Cruz Jan 29 '11 at 1:31
    
Yes, but why! It is of no practical use. –  Mitch Wheat Jan 29 '11 at 1:32
1  
Practical use is of no matter to me. What I need for the moment is a walkthrough on proper padding and endianness in a windows x64 platform. –  John dela Cruz Jan 29 '11 at 1:35

2 Answers 2

Well I did my own implementation and I hit the same wall/obstacle during implementation.

A + Padding is 0x61800000 it's correct, but the 64 bits used for length indication is in big-endianness format. So out of those 64 bits the last 4 bytes are zero and the 4 bytes preceding those contains the length of the message bytes*8 bits, the least significant bits preceding the most significant bits.

Another problem with the code you copied from the RFC standard of the MD5 hash. The MD5Transform function copies the data from char array format (left-to-right) and requires them to be packed in a 32bit integer in (little-endian) format. After performing the computational cycles you need to translate the results from (little-endian) 32bit integer into the char array format requiring you to reverse the encoding step that was done during the initial call of MD5Transform.

Hope this helps.

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BTW an empty message structure would all be zeros, however the first byte must be 0x80 as that is the first padding bit. –  Nocturnal Apr 1 '11 at 1:03

I've recently had similar trouble with implementing MD5. If you're on Windows or another OS that uses little-endian, try this:

message[0] = 0x00008061;
message[1] = 0x00000000;
message[2] = 0x00000000;
message[3] = 0x00000000;
message[4] = 0x00000000;
message[5] = 0x00000000;
message[6] = 0x00000000;
message[7] = 0x00000000;
message[8] = 0x00000000;
message[9] = 0x00000000;
message[10] = 0x00000000;
message[11] = 0x00000000;
message[12] = 0x00000000;
message[13] = 0x00000000;
message[14] = 0x00000008;
message[15] = 0x00000000;

This might not be your only problem (if it is indeed the case). I have tried using your big-endian paddings on my little-endian OS with a correct MD5 algorithm (that has been confirmed to give correct output with little-endian padding), and it gives me the following output: 0ecd585059e57624a4ae86cf9935178a This probably means that you just have to look through your algorithm again.

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