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subprocess.call(["/home/blah/trunk/blah/run.sh", "/tmp/ad_xml", "/tmp/video_xml"])

I do this. However, inside my run.sh, I have "relative" paths. So, I have to "cd" into that directory, and then run the shell script. How do I do that?

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I'm not a subprocess expert, but could you do: subprocess.call([""cd /run/path; /home/blah/trunk/blah/run.sh", "/tmp/ad_xml", "/tmp/video_xml"]) ?? –  inspectorG4dget Jan 29 '11 at 2:51
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use the cwd argument to subprocess.call()

From the docs here: http://docs.python.org/library/subprocess.html

If cwd is not None, the child’s current directory will be changed to cwd before it is executed. Note that this directory is not considered when searching the executable, so you can’t specify the program’s path relative to cwd.

Example:

subprocess.call(["/home/blah/trunk/blah/run.sh", "/tmp/ad_xml", "/tmp/video_xml"], cwd='/tmp')
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So I should have a subprocess.call above that line? –  TIMEX Jan 29 '11 at 2:51
    
This doesn't work. subprocess.call(["cwd /home/blah/trunk/blah/"]) It says OSError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory –  TIMEX Jan 29 '11 at 2:52
    
You put cwd as an named Python argument. I added an example to the answer. –  payne Jan 29 '11 at 2:54
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Well, you could use subprocess.Popen with Shell = True and cwd = "Your desired working directory"

EDIT: It appears that call has the same arguments so just setting a cwd argument would work:

subprocess.call(["/home/blah/trunk/blah/run.sh", "/tmp/ad_xml", "/tmp/video_xml"], cwd="PATH")
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You can supply your working directory like this:

subprocess.call(["/home/blah/trunk/blah/run.sh", "/tmp/ad_xml", "/tmp/video_xml"], cwd="/home/blah/trunk/blah")

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