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Im trying to understand indexes better for when I use Mysql. One issue is Im still having a hard time to determine what type of index I should use such as individual indexes, multi column indexes, covering indexes etc.

One question I have is, is there a general rule to decide what type of indexes to use? When I design my database layout I dont know exactly what all queries will be used until the application is done being built. For one table I could query on one or multiple fields as well as query it for reporting. So if I query a table like so:

SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE field1 = this AND field2 = that GROUP BY field3 ORDER BY field4

Would I create a multiple column index on field1,field3,field3 and field4?

Also what if I have a different query on the same table like:

SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE field1 = this and field3 = that

If I had the multiple column index from the first query will that same index work for the second query since field1 is on the farthest left of the index?

And another question I had was is there a specific order mysql looks for indexes? So for multiple column or a covering index do I add indexes in order of the where clause? Then anything in group clause then anything in order clause? Or does mysql automatically do this?

Sorry for all the questions, just looking for help on this.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  • Engine

First you have to decide which Engine you want to use for a given table

  1. InnoDB is preferable (transactions...) but does not offer fulltext index
  2. If you need fulltext index, you have to chose MyISAM

(Full text index keeps an index based on words in a column)

  • Tables

You have to know that MySQL uses only one index per table maximum in a join. So, don't expect MySQL to combine two indexes of a given table.

  • Multi-columns

Chose the order of the column based on the queries, provided that MySQL can use the top of the index if necessary

For instance

  CREATE INDEX myindex ON mytable (col1,col2,col3)

MySQL can use (col1), (col1,col2) and (col1,col2,col3) as index. So to answer your question, your index should be created on

  (field1,field3,field2,field4).

since your two queries needs (field1,field3) and (field1,field2,field3,field4).

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@ring0 So if you had a index on col1,col2,col3 it can use col1, col1 and col2 as well as col1,col2,col3 but it cant use it for col1,col3? Also you said the index should be created for field1 and field3, is that the answer to the second query I gave in my example? –  John Jan 29 '11 at 4:16
    
@John Exactly. It cannot skip a column in an index. I edited the answer, the index to be used by the two queries is on the 4 columns, but in that order: fiedl1,field3,field2,field4 (the order matters for the 2 first fields, while field3/4 could be field4/3). –  ring0 Jan 29 '11 at 4:18
    
@ring0 Thank you very much for your help. Another question, you have field1,field3,field2,field4. Does that mean for multiple column indexes it doesnt matter the order of the index as long as the left most field is being used first and the rest of the fields are being used in the query? So having an index on field1,field3,field2,field4 would work for this query as well? SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE field1 = this AND field4 = that –  John Jan 29 '11 at 4:24
    
@John In this case only the first column index would be used (field1), since MySQL cannot skip field3 and field2 in the index to reach field4 (for the sake of performance). You need an index starting with (field1,field4...) if you need that query to use an index for the two columns. –  ring0 Jan 29 '11 at 4:31
    
@ring0 So this is where Im getting confused, if I add index for col1,col3,col2,col4 how does this work for the first query I gave where it has SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE field1 = this and field2 = that GROUP BY field3 ORDER BY field4 –  John Jan 29 '11 at 4:42
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When I design my database layout I dont know exactly what all queries will be used until the application is done being built

Correct. Don't build indexes until you know all the queries. It's okay to add, change, alter and remove indexes. Indeed, good designers change the indexes as the use of the software changes.

Would I create a multiple column index on field1,field3,field3 and field4?

Rarely.

If I had the multiple column index from the first query will that same index work for the second query since field1 is on the farthest left of the index?

No.

And another question I had was is there a specific order mysql looks for indexes?

No.

So for multiple column or a covering index do I add indexes in order of the where clause?

No

Then anything in group clause then anything in order clause?

No.

Or does mysql automatically do this?

More-or-less.

Here's the rule.

  1. Design the database.

  2. Write the queries.

  3. Find the most common queries. 20% of your queries do 80% of the work. Focus on the few, slow queries that need indexes.

  4. Explain the query execution plans for only the most common queries. There's an EXPLAIN statement for this.

  5. Measure the performance of those queries with realistic loads of data. You have to build fake data for this. Some queries will be slow. Indexes may help. Some queries will not be slow.

  6. Now comes the hard part. Try different indexes until (a) the explain plan looks optimal and (b) the measured query performance meets your expectations.

You cannot get all queries to be fast.

You do not build indexes for all queries.

Focus on the 20% of the queries that cost 80% of the time.

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