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I've read several tutorials on CSS, but none of the sites I've looked at mentions or explains what a "." means in CSS.

What does the . mean?

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So why did you not read what it meant on that site? –  leppie Jan 29 '11 at 6:15
    
@leppie - he probably meant "not one" instead of "on one". –  Franci Penov Jan 29 '11 at 6:17
    
@Franci Penov: I can hardly believe not a single site explained it. It is one of the primitive concepts of CSS. –  leppie Jan 29 '11 at 6:18
    
@leppie - I agree with you. that does not preclude that the OP just had a poor google-fu day. –  Franci Penov Jan 29 '11 at 6:20
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3 Answers

Well, in the following context:

.foo {
   //properties
}

it indicates that foo is a class. A # means it's an id and if it has nothing it means that it is for all tags of that type. So, in html, you would implement something with a "." like this:

<div class = "foo"></div>

For a "#" it would be

<div id = "foo"></div>

Use class/"." if you want to apply it to more than one thing. Use id/"#" if you want it to apply to one thing.

Ok, so if your wondering what a class is: A class is one of the three (I think it's 3) types of ways you select stuff in css. The id (which I explained) says that the following properties apply to anything (usually one thing) with 'id="foo"' in its tag. A class selector means that it applies to everything with a "class="foo"" in its tag. If it has none of these than it means that it applies to all things with that name.

.foo { //applies to all things with "class="foo"" in tag.
    border: black thin solid // applies a black border to them.
}
#foo { //applies to all things with "id="foo"" in tag.
    border: black thin solid // applies a black border to them.
}
div{ //applies to all div tags.
    border: black thin solid // applies a black border to them.
}
h1{ //applies to all h1 tags
    border: black thin solid // applies a black border to them.
}
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It is a class selector. Means the rule should be applied to all elements that have an attribute class with the value after the ..

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3  
See w3fools.com — As usual there are errors here. "In the example below, all p elements with class="center" will be center-aligned:" isn't true. text-align doesn't centre the element to which it is applied, it centres the inline and text children of that element. –  Quentin Jan 29 '11 at 6:53
    
Yes, the w3schools do have some mistakes. –  Franci Penov Jan 29 '11 at 20:56
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Nothing without context.

I'll hazard a guess that you are referring to a class selector.

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