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In an interview they asked me if using function pointers would be beneficial (in terms of speed) when writing code for embedded systems? I had no idea on embedded system so could not answer the question. Just a cloudy or vague answer. So what are the real benefits? Speed, readability, maintenance,cost?

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The interviewer clearly didn't have much experience with embedded systems and/or programming, to ask that question. The benefits could be both speed, readability and maintenance! Though "native" function pointers have a quite horrid syntax, which you must typedef away, or they won't be readable at all. –  Lundin Jan 29 '11 at 19:47
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This question can actually be read two ways - most people assume speed of execution is the issue, but it can also be read literally to wonder about benefit in speed of writing the code. That can be substantial, if you use them as a mean to collapse the commonalities between slightly different cases - or data objects. Parts of embedded work need to run fast; in other cases such as embedded UI's its more about getting rich functionality working in one is often a short development cycle. –  Chris Stratton Jan 30 '11 at 5:40
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The trick when given an ambiguous question by an interviewer is to ask smart counter-questions to clarify. That may be exactly what the interviewer is looking for. –  Clifford Jan 30 '11 at 9:17
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I gave Chris and Clifford points on this one, the real answer is "it depends". You need to find out what the real question is by asking good questions, answer with the pros and cons, risky but fast, maintainable but slow, etc. The detailed number of bits and bytes or nanosecond differences is not nearly as interesting as how you approach the problem in a pressure situation. –  dwelch Jan 31 '11 at 1:02

10 Answers 10

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I think perhaps Viren Shakya's answer misses the point that the interviewer was trying to elicit. In some constructs the use of a function pointer may speed up execution. For example, if you have an index, using that to index an array of function pointers may be faster than a large switch.

If however you are comparing a static function call with a call through a pointer then Viren is right in pointing out that there is an additional operation to load the pointer variable. But no one reasonably tries to use a function pointer in that way (just as an alternative to calling directly).

Calling a function through a pointer is not an alternative to a direct call. So, the question of "advantage" is flawed; they are used in different circumstances, often to simplify other code logic and control flow and not to merely avoid a static function call. Their usefulness is in that the determination of the function to be called is performed dynamically at run-time by your code rather than statically by the linker. In that sense they are of course useful in embedded systems but not for any reason related to embedded systems specifically.

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Nice answer, making the distinction of dynamic (run-time) decision of what to call via the function pointer. Also good to point out that the advantages/uses of function pointers really have nothing to do with embedded systems per se. –  Dan Jan 30 '11 at 2:01
    
Thanks Clifford for clarification. –  Viren Jan 31 '11 at 8:03

That was a trick question. There are industries where pointers are forbidden.

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Another thing to consider is that this question would be a good opportunity to demonstrate how you go about making design decisions during the development process. One response I could imagine giving would be turning around and considering what your implementation alternatives are. Taking a page from Casey's and Lundin's answers, I've found callback functions very useful in isolating my modules from each other and making code changes easier because my code is in a perpetual prototyping stage and things change quickly and often. What my current concerns are is ease of development, not so much speed.

In my case my code generally involves having multiple modules which need to signal each other to synchronize the order of operations. Previously I had implemented this as a whole slew of flags and data structures with extern linkage. With this implementation, two issues generally sucked up my time:

  1. Since any module can touch the extern variables a lot of my time is spent policing each module to make sure those variables are being used as intended.
  2. If another developer introduced a new flag, I found myself diving through multiple modules looking for the original declaration and (hopefully) a usage description in the comments.

With callback functions that problem goes away because the function becomes the signalling mechanism and you take advantage of these benefits:

  1. Module interactions are enforced by function interfaces and you can test for pre/post-conditions.
  2. Less need for globally shared data structures as the callback serves as that interface to outside modules.
  3. Reduced coupling means I can swap out code relatively easier.

At the moment I'll take the performance hit as my device still performs adequately even with all the extra function calls. I'll consider my alternatives when that performance begins to become a bigger issue.

Going back to the interview question, even though you may not be as technically proficient in the nuts and bolts of function pointers, I would think you'd still be a valuable candidate knowing you're cognizant of the tradeoffs made during the design process.

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You gain on speed but lose some on readability and maintenance. Instead of a if-then-else tree, if a then fun_a(), else if b then fun_b(), else if c then fun_c() else fun_default(), and having to do that every time, instead if a then fun=fun_a, else if b then fun=fun_b, etc and you do that one time, from then on just call fun(). Much faster. As pointed out you cannot inline, which is another speed trick but inlining on the if-then-else tree doesnt necessarily make it faster than without inlining and is generall not as fast as the function pointer.

You lose a little readability and maintenance because you have to figure out where fun() is set, how often it changes if ever, insure you dont call it before it is setup, but it is still a single searchable name you can use to find and maintain all the places it is used.

It is basically a speed trick to avoid if-then-else trees every time you want to perform a function. If performance is not critical, if nothing else fun() could be static and have the if-then-else tree in it.

EDIT Adding some examples to explain what I was talking about.

extern unsigned int fun1 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b );

unsigned int (*funptr)(unsigned int, unsigned int);

void have_fun ( unsigned int x, unsigned int y, unsigned int z )
{
    unsigned int j;
    funptr=fun1;

    j=fun1(z,5);
    j=funptr(y,6);
}

Compiling gives this:

have_fun:
    stmfd   sp!, {r3, r4, r5, lr}
    .save {r3, r4, r5, lr}
    ldr r4, .L2
    mov r5, r1
    mov r0, r2
    mov r1, #5
    ldr r2, .L2+4
    str r2, [r4, #0]
    bl  fun1
    ldr r3, [r4, #0]
    mov r0, r5
    mov r1, #6
    blx r3
    ldmfd   sp!, {r3, r4, r5, pc}

What I assume Clifford was talking about is that a direct call, if near enough (depending on the architecture), is one instruction

    bl  fun1

Where a function pointer, is going to cost you at least two

    ldr r3, [r4, #0]
    blx r3

I had also mentioned the difference between direct and indirect was the extra load you incur.

Before moving on it is worth mentioning the pros and cons of inlining. In the case of ARM which is what these examples are using, the calling convention uses r0-r3 for incoming parameters to a function and r0 to return. So entry into have_fun() with three parameters means r0-r3 have content. With ARM it is also assumed that a function can destroy r0-r3, so have_fun() needs to preserve the inputs and then place the two inputs to fun1() in r0 and r1, so a bit of a register dance happens.

    mov r5, r1
    mov r0, r2
    mov r1, #5
    ldr r2, .L2+4
    str r2, [r4, #0]
    bl  fun1

The compiler was smart enough to see that we never needed the first input to the have_fun() function, so r0 was discarded and allowed to be changed right away. Also the compiler was smart enough to know that we would never need the third parameter, z (r2), after sending it to fun1() on the first call, so it didnt need to save it in a high register. R1 though, the second parameter to have_fun() does need to be preserved so it is put in a regsiter that wont get destroyed by fun1().

You can see the same kind of thing happen for the second function call.

Assuming fun1() is this simple function:

inline unsigned int fun1 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b )
{
    return(a+b);
}

When you inline fun1() you get something like this:

    stmfd   sp!, {r4, lr}
    mov r0, r1
    mov r1, #6
    add r4, r2, #5

The compiler does not need to shuffle the lower registers about to prepare for a call. Likewise what you may have noticed is that r4 and lr are preserved on the stack when we enter hello_fun(). With this ARM calling convention a function can destroy r0-r3 but must preserve all the other registers, since have_fun() in this case needed more than four registers to do its thing it saved the contents of r4 on the stack so that it could use it. Likewise this function as I compiled it did call another function, the bl/blx instruction uses/destroys the lr register (r14) so in order for have_fun() to return we also have to preserve lr on the stack. The simplified example for fun1() did not show this but another savings you get from inlining is that on entry the function called does not have to set up a stack frame and preserve registers, it really is as if you took the code from the function and shoved it inline with the calling function.

Why wouldnt you inline all the time? Well first it can and will use more registers and that can lead to more stack use, and stack is slow relative to registers. Most important though is that it increases the size of your binary, if fun1() was a good sized function and you called it 20 times in have_fun() your binary would be considerably larger. For modern computers with gigabytes of ram, a few hundred or few dozen thousand bytes is no big deal, but for embedded with limited resources this can make or break you. On a modern gigahertz multicore desktop, how often do you need to shave an instruction or five anyway? Sometimes yes but not all the time for every function. So just because you probably can get away with it on a desktop you probably should not.

Back to function pointers. So the point I was trying to make with my answer is, what situations would you likely want to use a function pointer anyway, what are the use cases and in those use cases how much does it help or hurt?

The kinds of cases I was thinking of are plugins, or code specific to a calling parameter or generic code reacting to specific hardware detected. For example, a hypothetical tar program may want to output to a tape drive, file system, or other and you may choose to write the code with generic functions called using function pointers. Upon entry to the program the command line parameters indicate the output and at that point you set the function pointers to the device specific functions.

if(outdev==OUTDEV_TAPE) data_out=data_out_tape;
else if(outdev==OUTDEV_FILE)
{
    //open the file, etc
    data_out=data_out_file;
}
...

Or perhaps you dont know if you are running on a processor with an fpu or which fpu type you have but you know that a floating point divide you want to do can run much faster using the fpu:

if(fputype==FPU_FPA) fdivide=fdivide_fpa;
else if(fputype==FPU_VFP) fdivide=fdivide_vfp;
else fdivide=fdivide_soft;

And absolutely you can use a case statement instead of an if-then-else tree, pros and cons to each, some compilers turn a case statement int an if-then-else tree anyway, so it doesnt always matter. The point I was trying to make is if you do this one time:

if(fputype==FPU_FPA) fdivide=fdivide_fpa;
else if(fputype==FPU_VFP) fdivide=fdivide_vfp;
else fdivide=fdivide_soft;

And do this every where else in the program:

a=fdivide(b,c);

Compared to a non-function-pointer alternative where you do this every where you want to divide:

if(fputype==FPU_FPA) a=fdivide_fpa(b,c);
else if(fputype==FPU_VFP) a=fdivide_vfp(b,c);
else a=fdivide_soft(b,c);

The function pointer approach, even though it costs you an extra ldr on each call, is a lot cheaper than the many instructions required for the if-then-else tree. You pay a little up front to setup the fdivide pointer one time then pay an extra ldr on each instance, but overall it is faster than this:


unsigned int fun1 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b );
unsigned int fun2 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b );
unsigned int fun3 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b );

unsigned int (*funptr)(unsigned int, unsigned int);

unsigned int have_fun ( unsigned int x, unsigned int y, unsigned int z )
{
    unsigned int j;

    switch(x)
    {
        default:
        case 1: j=fun1(y,z); break;
        case 2: j=fun2(y,z); break;
        case 3: j=fun3(y,z); break;
    }
    return(j);
}

unsigned int more_fun ( unsigned int x, unsigned int y, unsigned int z )
{
    unsigned int j;
    j=funptr(y,z);
    return(j);
}

gives us this:

    cmp r0, #2
    beq .L3
    cmp r0, #3
    beq .L4
    mov r0, r1
    mov r1, r2
    b   fun1
.L3:
    mov r0, r1
    mov r1, r2
    b   fun2
.L4:
    mov r0, r1
    mov r1, r2
    b   fun3

instead of this

    mov r0, r1
    ldr r3, .L7
    mov r1, r2
    blx r3

For the default case the if-then-else tree burns two compares and two beq's before calling the function directly. Basically sometimes the if-then-else tree will be faster and sometimes the function pointer is faster.

Another comment I made is what if you used inlining to make that if-then-else tree faster, instead of a function pointer, inlining is always faster right?

unsigned int fun1 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b )
{
    return(a+b);
}
unsigned int fun2 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b )
{
    return(a-b);
}
unsigned int fun3 ( unsigned int a, unsigned int b )
{
    return(a&b);
}

unsigned int have_fun ( unsigned int x, unsigned int y, unsigned int z )
{
    unsigned int j;

    switch(x)
    {
        default:
        case 1: j=fun1(y,z); break;
        case 2: j=fun2(y,z); break;
        case 3: j=fun3(y,z); break;
    }
    return(j);
}

gives

have_fun:
    cmp r0, #2
    rsbeq   r0, r2, r1
    bxeq    lr
    cmp r0, #3
    addne   r0, r2, r1
    andeq   r0, r2, r1
    bx  lr

LOL, ARM got me on that one. That is nice. You can imagine though for a generic processor you would get something like

    cmp r0, #2
    beq .L3
    cmp r0, #3
    beq .L4
    and r0,r1,r2
    bx lr
.L3:
    sub r0,r1,r2
    bx lr
.L4:
    add r0,r1,r2
    bx lr

You still burn the compares, the more cases you have the longer the if-then-else tree. It doesnt take much for the average case to take longer than a function pointer solution.

    mov r0, r1
    ldr r1, .L7
    ldr r3,[r1]
    mov r1, r2
    blx r3

Then I also mentioned readability and maintenance, using the function pointer approach you need to always be aware of whether or not the function pointer has been assigned before using it. You cannot always just grep for that function name and find what you are looking for in someone elses code, ideally you find one place where that pointer is assigned, then you can grep for the real function names.

Yes there are many other use cases for function pointers, and the ones I have described can be solved in many other ways, efficient or not. I was trying to give the poster some ideas on how to think through different scenarios.

I think the most important answer to this interview question is not that there is a right or wrong answer, because I think there is not. But to see what the interviewee knows about what compilers do or dont do, the kinds of things I described above. The interview question to me is a few questions, do you understand what the compiler actually does, what instructions it generates. Do you understand that fewer or more instructions is not necessarily faster. do you understand these differences across different processors, or do you at least have a working knowledge for at least one processor. Then it goes on to readability and maintenance. That is another stream of questions that has to do with your experience in reading other peoples code, and then maintaining your own code or other peoples code. It is a cleverly designed question in my opinion.

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1  
I doubt that your suggested usage is faster at all, let alone "much faster". In the first you call a function, in the second you set a variable then call a function; how is that faster, and the if-then-else tree is not eradicated at all. Very marginally slower I'd suggest. It may marginally reduce the code size. –  Clifford Jan 29 '11 at 19:23
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@Clifford on an arm for example, bl r0 is a fairly fast solution at execution time, compared to if random amounts of code then bl address, else random amounts of code then bl address, else random amounts of code...I was talking about practical usage. if directly comparing inline vs directly using the function vs a pointer to that function (and not usage)then speed is in that order, inline (do function), direct (save and prep regs, bl address, stack stuff, function, stack stuff, bx lr), indirect (save and prep regs, ldr rx, address to function, bl rx, stack stuff, function, stack stuff, bx lr) –  dwelch Jan 29 '11 at 19:56
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Used right, you can increase readability and organization by using function pointers to to replace selection logic with well thought out abstraction. –  Chris Stratton Jan 30 '11 at 5:37
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@dwelch: I am not convinced by your explanation, perhaps if you post real code examples to explain your meaning rather than "inlining" your code in the text. Where does "random amounts of code" suddenly appear from in this explanation? –  Clifford Jan 30 '11 at 9:14
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@dwelch: My apologies, I believe you probably have a point, but I am not sure you have expressed it clearly - it may be just me. I felt that it might be clearer had you separated out the pseudo-code into code mark-up blocks rather than burying it in the text. A side effect being I can withdraw the perhaps hasty vote-down if you edit the answer. @Chris Stratton: Agreed, but the answer appears to give the same conditional code in both instances, and merely moves the function call location, which is the source of my comment. –  Clifford Jan 31 '11 at 20:50

Yes, they are useful. I'm not sure what the interviewer was getting at. Basically it is irrelevant if the system is embedded or not. Unless you have a severely limited stack.

  • Speed No, the fastest system would be a single function, and only use global variables and goto's scattered throughout. Good luck with that.
  • Readability Yes, it might confuse some people, but overall certain code is more readable with function pointers. It will also allow you to increase the separation of concerns between the various aspects of source code.
  • Maintainability Yes, with function pointers you will have less conditionals, less duplicated code, increased seperation of code, and generally more orthogonal software.
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There are many uses.

The single-most important use of function pointers in embedded systems is to create vector tables. Many MCU architectures use a table of addresses located in NVM, where each address points to an ISR (interrupt service routine). Such a vector table can be written in C as an array of function pointers.

Function pointers are also useful for callback functions. As an example from the real world, the other day I was writing a driver for an on-chip realtime clock. There was only one clock on the chip, but I needed many timers. This was solved by saving a counter for each software timer, which was increased by the realtime clock interrupt. The data type looked something like this:

typedef struct
{
  uint16_t counter;
  void (*callback)(void);

} Timer_t;

When the hardware timer were equal with the software timer, the callback function specified by the user was called, through the function pointer stored together with the counter. Something like the above is quite a common construct in embedded systems.

Function pointers are also useful when creating bootloaders etc, where you will be writing code into NVM in runtime and then call it. You can do this through a function pointer, but never through a linked function, as the code isn't actually there at link time.

Function pointers are of course, as already mentioned, useful for many optimizations, like optimizing away a switch statement where each "case" is an adjacent number.

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Good answer. Thanks indeed –  user349026 Jan 30 '11 at 13:06

Another disadvantage of function pointers (with respect to virtual functions since they are nothing but function pointers at the core level):

making a function inline && virtual will force compiler to create out-of-line copy of the same function. This will increase the size of the final binary (assuming heavy use of it is done).

Rule of thumb: 1: Don't make virtual calls inline

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One negative part of function pointers is that they will never be inlined at the callsites. This may or may not be beneficial, depending if you are compiling for speed or size. If the latter, they should be no different to normal function calls.

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Let's see...

Speed (say we are on ARM): then (theoretically):

(Normal Function Call ARM instruction size) < (Function Pointer Call-setup instruction(s) size)

Since their is a additional level of indirection to setup a function pointer call, it will involve an additional ARM instruction.

PS: A normal function call: a function call that is set up with BL.

PSS: Don't know actual sizes for them but it should be easy to verify.

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3  
I doubt that the interviewer was looking for that answer. –  Clifford Jan 29 '11 at 19:15
1  
Why do you keep talking about ARM here? What in the original question is directing you to tailor your answer to the ARM architecture? –  Dan Jan 30 '11 at 1:54
1  
Of embedded chips that run C well, ARM variants do happen to be kind of popular at the moment... –  Chris Stratton Jan 30 '11 at 5:33
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Sorry, I meant to use ARM only as an example, and also because it is heavily used in many embedded systems. –  Viren Jan 31 '11 at 8:00

I would have said that they are beneficial (in terms of speed) in any environment, not just embedded. The idea being that once the pointer has been pointed at the correct function, there is no further decision logic required in order to call that function.

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Ok, edited the question, may be its more clear now –  user349026 Jan 29 '11 at 10:10
    
Edited likewise. –  trojanfoe Jan 29 '11 at 10:12
    
It may still not be entirely clear, but I think your point is that the use of function pointers can in some circumstances simplify or remove selection logic. The speed does not come from simply replacing a static call with a pointer call; that is impractical and as @Viren pointed out, is not faster. –  Clifford Jan 29 '11 at 19:27
    
@Clifford: agreed. –  trojanfoe Jan 30 '11 at 9:47

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