Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have just started learning PHP and I have read several answers to pretty much similar question, but it didn't help.

I have several files:

index.php 
folder1\file.php
folder2\file.php 

So index.php includes folder1\file.php and it is really easy. Then folder1\file.php includes folder2\file.php. The book I am reading says to do this I have to write this inside folder1\file.php:

require $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'] . '/' . 'folder2/file.php';

So basically why didn't they do this?

require 'folder2/file.php';

As far as I understood, all the paths are always relative to the initial script's location and it works just fine on my machine.

I still don't get why not use .\folder\file.php which would keep it working if I move my directory deeper or copy the whole website to another machine.

According to the manual: If a path is defined — whether absolute (starting with a drive letter or \ on Windows, or / on Unix/Linux systems) or relative to the current directory (starting with . or ..) — the include path will be ignored altogether. For example, if a filename begins with ../, the parser will look in the parent directory.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The PHP manual says:

Files are included based on the file path given or, if none is given, the include_path specified. If the file isn't found in the include_path, include() will finally check in the calling script's own directory and the current working directory before failing.

So it's always a best practice to set the include path in your master file (in your case, index.php) using the set_include_path() method.

When working with frameworks or customised servers, it is good to specify your include path without leaving behind the system defined include paths by doing the following:

set_include_path(get_include_path() . PATH_SEPARATOR . $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT']);

That way, your new include path will be added to the existing paths.

For what you have asked in the question, it is always better to specify the include path as I mentioned above and then refer your files relatively. If in case in future you want to move your files, editing just one line will do instead of finding and replacing in hundreds of files.

Example:

index.php:

set_include_path(get_include_path() . PATH_SEPARATOR . $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT']);
require('folder1/file.php');

folder1/file.php:

require('folder2/file.php');

folder2/file.php:

require('folder3/file.php');

and so on..

share|improve this answer
    
The path that gets set after the call of set_include_path is the following: SCRIPTBASEphp_classes;.;/usr/local/php5/PEAR;Z:/home/localhost/www. If a script is one folder deeper than the root it won't work! I still don't get why not use ".\folder\file.php". According to the manual: If a path is defined — whether absolute (starting with a drive letter or \ on Windows, or / on Unix/Linux systems) or relative to the current directory (starting with . or ..) — the include_path will be ignored altogether. For example, if a filename begins with ../, the parser will look in the parent directory. –  Dan Jan 29 '11 at 16:38
    
Starting with a root slash works differently in different operating environments. IIS will start looking at the root of the virtual host (like C:\inetpub\sites\yoursite), while any Unix based system is going to start looking at the root of the hard drive. A guaranteed pain if you are migrating in future. –  Nirmal Jan 29 '11 at 18:16

Simply because it good practice. Not all you scripts using folder2/file.php are going to be called from the root directory.

Say if you have

index.php
folder1\file.php
folder2\file.php
folder3\use-folder2.php

and you try to include file.php from folder2 from use-folder2.php then using your idea the path it will look for the file would be :

folder3\folder2\file.php

which doesn't exists.

That's why they are making you start your path from the root of your web site.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, that was fast. But what if I for some reason have to move all my scripts one folder deeper - newfolder\index.php etc. I will have to change all of the paths in requires! –  Dan Jan 29 '11 at 10:56
    
That's why as a good practice, you have an include directory at the root of your website where you add all the file that are included in other files. Using the $_SERVER[DocumentRoot] in your inclusion will make all the rest of your code insensitive to how deep you put these new files. –  Yahel Jan 29 '11 at 14:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.