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public class A {
    public void f1(String str) {
        System.out.println("A.f1(String)");
        this.f1(1, str);
    }

    public void f1(int i, String str) {
        System.out.println("A.f1(int, String)");
    }
}



public class B extends A {
    @Override
    public void f1(String str) {
        System.out.println("B.f1(String)");
        super.f1(str);
    }

    @Override
    public void f1(int i, String str) {
        System.out.println("B.f1(int, String)");
        super.f1(i, str);
    }
}


public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        B b = new B();
        b.f1("Hello");
    }
}

I'm seeking that this code would output:

B.f1(String)
A.f1(String)
A.f1(int, String)

Yet I'm getting:

B.f1(String)
A.f1(String)
B.f1(int, String)
A.f1(int, String)

I understand that under the context of B "this" in A.f1(String) is B's instance. Do I have the option to do the chain new B1().f1(String) -> (A's) f1(String) -> (A's) f1(int, String) ?

This is a theoretical question, practically the solution would obviously be in A to implement a private function that both f1(String) and f1(int, String) would call.

Thank you,
Maxim.

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1  
I tried using reflection (getting a Method-object for A's f1(int, String) and invoking it), but it didn't work. This [blog entry][1] in Sun's blogs points out that this isn't possible with Java. [1]: blogs.sun.com/sundararajan/entry/… –  esaj Jan 29 '11 at 12:23
    
@esaj Nice find on the link –  Bert F Jan 29 '11 at 12:31
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3 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, no

As i'm sure you're aware, but I'll state explicitly for completeness - there are only the 2 keywords to control the method invocation:

  • this - this.method() - looks for method starting from the invoking instance's class (the instance's "top" virtual table - implied default)
  • super - super.method() - looks for method starting from the parent class of the class in which the invoking method is defined (the invoking class' parent's virtual table - not strictly true, but simpler to think of this way - thanks @maaartinus)

I can imagine another keyword (e.g. current?) do what you describe:

  • current - current.method() - looks for method starting from the class in which the invoking method is defined

but Java doesn't have such a keyword (yet?).

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AFAIK, super.method() does not start at the parent's VT. There's no VT lookup at all, it works in a way similar to calling private methods. AFAIK, it gets compiled using invokespecial. –  maaartinus Jan 29 '11 at 13:10
    
@maaartinus - thanks - ah, I love to learn something new everyday. So, there is no invokevirtualstartingfromparent instruction - invokespecial is used for the super call and invokespecial uses compile-time binding. So, at the time of the super call, we know enough about the type to do compile-time resolution of the target method. If that method is not implemented in the direct superclass, then I assume the equivalent of a search up the hierarchy is still necessary. Is the end result effectively the same? –  Bert F Jan 29 '11 at 13:45
    
I don't think there's any lookup at runtime, not even in this case. IIUIC, super means actually first ancestor having it. The compiler must know the whole hierarchy, so it writes the proper ancestor in the class file. In case the method is not there (which can be done only by tricks using another classfile), a NoSuchMethodError gets thrown. –  maaartinus Jan 29 '11 at 14:49
    
@maartinus - agreed, the method is always resolved at compile time. I meant that "the equivalent of a search ... is still necessary" at compile time, so the end result is the same - the nearest method up the hierarchy is found and invoked. –  Bert F Jan 29 '11 at 15:06
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I'm afraid, it's impossible, but there's a simple workaround:

public class A {
    public void f1(String str) {
        System.out.println("A.f1(String)");
        this.privateF1(1, str);
    }

    private void privateF1(int i, String str) {
        System.out.println("A.f1(int, String)");
    }

    public void f1(int i, String str) {
        privateF1(i, str);
    }
}
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Overridden methods in Java are dynamically bound. i.e. the type of the actual instance of the object dictates what will be called. final methods (which can't be overridden) and private methods (which can't be inherited) are statically bound.

In C++, for contrast, you'd have to explicitly make the functions virtual to get the same behaviour.

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