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This is my first, attempt at a, Makefile after necessity from a previous post.

Anyway here's the code

SortLab.exe : SelectionSort.o Main.o  
        g++ -o $@ $^  
SelectionSort.o : SelectionSort.cpp SelectionSort.h  
Main.o : Main.cpp  

#-------------------------------------------------------------

run: SortLab.exe  
        ./SortLab.exe  

clean:  
    rm -f *.o  
    rm -f *.exe  

build: clean SortLab.exe  

%.o: %.cpp  
    g++ -c $<  

I intend to have SelectionSort.cpp & SelectionSort.h form an object file, and Main.cpp to form its own object file. Then finally create an executable. Main.cpp depends on SelectionSort.cpp, where do I go wrong?

Also where can I find what the different GNU commands mean, -o -c and such

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3  
What exactly goes wrong? –  Job Jan 29 '11 at 12:01
    
I second the previous comment, but the first thing I'd check is whether every indented thing has a tab character before it with no spaces. It's probably the most common error in Makefiles, especially for beginners. –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 29 '11 at 12:05
    
I can't believe one source module depends on another. You probably want to have the object file depend on the header. Also, the options can be found in the GCC manual at gcc.gnu.org. –  larsmans Jan 29 '11 at 12:06

1 Answer 1

  1. You shouldn't need to define the %.o: %.cpp rule yourself, Make knows how to compile C++.
  2. Indent with tabs, not spaces; Make is sensitive to the difference.
  3. Every object file should depend on the headers included in the source files it depends on. You probably need Main.o : Main.cpp SelectionSort.h.
  4. build shouldn't depend on clean, it defeats one of Make's main features (selectively recompilation when files have changed).
  5. If you make build the first target, you can run Make without a target to get a full compile. It's customary to call the main target all.
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For Point 3. If Main.cpp depends on SelectionSort.cpp, which includes SelectionSort.h would I still need that line "Main.o : Main.cpp SelectionSort.h."? –  Malaken Jan 29 '11 at 12:13
    
@Malaken, as noted above, one source file can't possibly depend on another (unless you have something crazy like #include "SelectionSort.cpp" there). @larsmans, the default target is the first one, how it is named is irrelevant, or am I wrong? –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 29 '11 at 12:18
    
@Malaken: modules should never depend on each other. Dependency of X on Y in Make means: to compile X, we need to first compile Y. Let the modules depend only on the headers. –  larsmans Jan 29 '11 at 12:18
    
@Sergey: you're right, my mistake. –  larsmans Jan 29 '11 at 12:20
    
SelectionSort.cpp holds a class, SelectionSort, that I use in main.cpp. –  Malaken Jan 29 '11 at 12:29

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