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My string is as follows:

smtp:jblack@test.com;SMTP:jb@test.com;X400:C=US;A= ;P=Test;O=Exchange;S=Jack;G=Black;

I need back:

smtp:jblack@test.com
SMTP:jb@test.com
X400:C=US;A= ;P=Test;O=Exchange;S=Jack;G=Black;

The problem is the semi-colons seperate the addresses and also part of the X400 address. Can anyone suggest how best to split this?

PS I should mentioned the order differs so it could be:

X400:C=US;A= ;P=Test;O=Exchange;S=Jack;G=Black;;smtp:jblack@test.com;SMTP:jb@test.com

There can be more than 3 address, 4, 5.. 10 etc including an X500 address, however they do all start with either smtp: SMTP: X400 or X500.

share|improve this question
    
+1, an intriguing one - so much so that I've got no "real" work done for the past 10 minutes! =) –  Rob Jan 27 '09 at 15:17

12 Answers 12

EDIT: With the updated information, this answer certainly won't do the trick - but it's still potentially useful, so I'll leave it here.

Will you always have three parts, and you just want to split on the first two semi-colons?

If so, just use the overload of Split which lets you specify the number of substrings to return:

string[] bits = text.Split(new char[]{';'}, 3);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 never even knew about this overload. Looks like Java has it, too! –  Outlaw Programmer Jan 27 '09 at 15:00
    
There can be more than 3 address, 4, 5.. 10 etc including an X500 address! –  Jack Black Jan 27 '09 at 15:01
    
They do all start with either smtp: SMTP: X400 or X500 –  Jack Black Jan 27 '09 at 15:01
    
So split on the SMTP: then –  GEOCHET Jan 27 '09 at 15:02
    
Can you update the question with this information? Will the SMTP entries always be before the other stuff? Do you know how many entries there are before you parse this string? –  Outlaw Programmer Jan 27 '09 at 15:03

May I suggest building a regular expression

(smtp|SMTP|X400|X500):((?!smtp:|SMTP:|X400:|X500:).)*;?

or protocol-less

.*?:((?![^:;]*:).)*;?

in other words find anything that starts with one of your protocols. Match the colon. Then continue matching characters as long as you're not matching one of your protocols. Finish with a semicolon (optionally).

You can then parse through the list of matches splitting on ':' and you'll have your protocols. Additionally if you want to add protocols, just add them to the list.

Likely however you're going to want to specify the whole thing as case-insensitive and only list the protocols in their uppercase or lowercase versions.

The protocol-less version doesn't care what the names of the protocols are. It just finds them all the same, by matching everything up to, but excluding a string followed by a colon or a semi-colon.

share|improve this answer
    
This nearly works but there is the assumption that addresses themselves do not contain the text smtp, X400 or X500. –  AnthonyWJones Jan 27 '09 at 16:23
    
Simple string formats really, really don't need regexes to split them IMHO, but this is a decent case for a regex. –  Robert P Jan 27 '09 at 16:33
    
I agree that you shouldn't use Regex where string.Split will work (and that's why the colon processing is done string.Split), but as soon as you end up writing a chunk of code for string processing I think you should start to look at regex's for doing the same thing (they're better at it). –  Orion Adrian Jan 27 '09 at 16:48
    
Then we're in violent agreement. :) –  Robert P Jan 27 '09 at 17:18

Split by the following regex pattern

string[] items = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Split(text, ";(?=\w+:)");

EDIT: better one can accept more special chars in the protocol name.

string[] items = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Split(text, ";(?=[^;:]+:)");
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work for the expressions involved if there is a space after the semi-colon. –  Orion Adrian Jan 27 '09 at 15:58
    
I've tested it on regextester.com and it works(can identify the correct ";" in the string). Could be the flag or preg compatibility issue? –  Dennis Cheung Jan 27 '09 at 15:59
    
Try adding a space after the semicolon, but before the next protocol and it will fail to match that semicolon. –  Orion Adrian Jan 27 '09 at 16:07
    
I see. I try to improve it. But how could the name of protocol start with a space? –  Dennis Cheung Jan 27 '09 at 16:13
    
I am just wondering, how this answer get downvoted but #483931 and #483931 get relatively more upvote? –  Dennis Cheung Jan 27 '09 at 16:19

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c1bs0eda.aspx check there, you can specify the number of splits you want. so in your case you would do

string.split(new char[]{';'}, 3);
share|improve this answer
    
As specified, he doesn't know the number of splits that need to be made. –  Orion Adrian Jan 27 '09 at 15:55

Not the fastest if you are doing this a lot but it will work for all cases I believe.

        string input1 = "smtp:jblack@test.com;SMTP:jb@test.com;X400:C=US;A= ;P=Test;O=Exchange;S=Jack;G=Black;";
        string input2 = "X400:C=US;A= ;P=Test;O=Exchange;S=Jack;G=Black;;smtp:jblack@test.com;SMTP:jb@test.com";
        Regex splitEmailRegex = new Regex(@"(?<key>\w+?):(?<value>.*?)(\w+:|$)");

        List<string> sets = new List<string>();

        while (input2.Length > 0)
        {
            Match m1 = splitEmailRegex.Matches(input2)[0];
            string s1 = m1.Groups["key"].Value + ":" + m1.Groups["value"].Value;
            sets.Add(s1);
            input2 = input2.Substring(s1.Length);
        }

        foreach (var set in sets)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(set);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();

Of course many will claim Regex: Now you have two problems. There may even be a better regex answer than this.

share|improve this answer

You could always split on the colon and have a little logic to grab the key and value.

string[] bits = text.Split(':');
List<string> values = new List<string>();
for (int i = 1; i < bits.Length; i++)
{
	string value = bits[i].Contains(';') ? bits[i].Substring(0, bits[i].LastIndexOf(';') + 1) : bits[i];
	string key = bits[i - 1].Contains(';') ? bits[i - 1].Substring(bits[i - 1].LastIndexOf(';') + 1) : bits[i - 1];
	values.Add(String.Concat(key, ":", value));
}

Tested it with both of your samples and it works fine.

share|improve this answer

This caught my curiosity .... So this code actually does the job, but again, wants tidying :)

My final attempt - stop changing what you need ;=)

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string fneh = "X400:C=US400;A= ;P=Test;O=Exchange;S=Jack;G=Black;x400:C=US400l;A= l;P=Testl;O=Exchangel;S=Jackl;G=Blackl;smtp:jblack@test.com;X500:C=US500;A= ;P=Test;O=Exchange;S=Jack;G=Black;SMTP:jb@test.com;";

    string[] parts = fneh.Split(new char[] { ';' });

    List<string> addresses = new List<string>();
    StringBuilder address = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (string part in parts)
    {
        if (part.Contains(":"))
        {
            if (address.Length > 0)
            {
                addresses.Add(semiColonCorrection(address.ToString()));
            }
            address = new StringBuilder();
            address.Append(part);
        }
        else
        {
            address.AppendFormat(";{0}", part);
        }
    }
    addresses.Add(semiColonCorrection(address.ToString()));

    foreach (string emailAddress in addresses)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(emailAddress);
    }
    Console.ReadKey();
}
private static string semiColonCorrection(string address)
{
    if ((address.StartsWith("x", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase)) && (!address.EndsWith(";")))
    {
        return string.Format("{0};", address);
    }
    else
    {
        return address;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Rob, This almost works for me, apart from the semi-colon is removed from the x400 address which breaks it (I need to leave the semi-colons in or append one also) plus I've just dicovered one address has two x400 addresses! X400 (uppercase) indicates a primary address x400 (lower) secondary! Thks –  Jack Black Jan 27 '09 at 15:41
    
That should be close enough... You could always add a conditional to "semiColonCorrection" that only adds the ";" back to the end for xNNN addresses, not smtp ones.. –  Rob Jan 27 '09 at 16:11
    
Worked a charm Rob, you are the MAN! Many thanks! –  Jack Black Jan 27 '09 at 16:51

Try these regexes. You can extract what you're looking for using named groups.

X400:(?<X400>.*?)(?:smtp|SMTP|$)
smtp:(?<smtp>.*?)(?:;+|$)
SMTP:(?<SMTP>.*?)(?:;+|$)

Make sure when constructing them you specify case insensitive. They seem to work with the samples you gave

share|improve this answer
    
It's picking up the words smtp after the X400 address. –  Orion Adrian Jan 27 '09 at 16:03
    
Are you checking the matches or the match groups? –  Rad Jan 27 '09 at 16:54

Lots of attempts. Here is mine ;)

string src = "smtp:jblack@test.com;SMTP:jb@test.com;X400:C=US;A= ;P=Test;O=Exchange;S=Jack;G=Black;";

Regex r = new Regex(@"
   (?:^|;)smtp:(?<smtp>([^;]*(?=;|$)))|
   (?:^|;)x400:(?<X400>.*?)(?=;x400|;x500|;smtp|$)|
   (?:^|;)x500:(?<X500>.*?)(?=;x400|;x500|;smtp|$)",
RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace);

foreach (Match m in r.Matches(src))
{
	if (m.Groups["smtp"].Captures.Count != 0)
		Console.WriteLine("smtp: {0}", m.Groups["smtp"]);
	else if (m.Groups["X400"].Captures.Count != 0)
		Console.WriteLine("X400: {0}", m.Groups["X400"]);
	else if (m.Groups["X500"].Captures.Count != 0)
		Console.WriteLine("X500: {0}", m.Groups["X500"]);	
}

This finds all smtp, x400 or x500 addresses in the string in any order of appearance. It also identifies the type of address ready for further processing. The appearance of the text smtp, x400 or x500 in the addresses themselves will not upset the pattern.

share|improve this answer

This works!

    string input =
        "smtp:jblack@test.com;SMTP:jb@test.com;X400:C=US;A= ;P=Test;O=Exchange;S=Jack;G=Black;";
    string[] parts = input.Split(';');
    List<string> output = new List<string>();
    foreach(string part in parts)
    {
        if (part.Contains(":"))
        {
            output.Add(part + ";");
        }
        else if (part.Length > 0)
        {
            output[output.Count - 1] += part + ";";
        }
    }
    foreach(string s in output)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(s);
    }
share|improve this answer

Do the semicolon (;) split and then loop over the result, re-combining each element where there is no colon (:) with the previous element.

string input = "X400:C=US;A= ;P=Test;O=Exchange;S=Jack;G="
  +"Black;;smtp:jblack@test.com;SMTP:jb@test.com";

string[] rawSplit = input.Split(';');

List<string> result = new List<string>();
  //now the fun begins
string buffer = string.Empty;
foreach (string s in rawSplit)
{
  if (buffer == string.Empty)
  {
    buffer = s;
  }
  else if (s.Contains(':'))
  {   
    result.Add(buffer);
    buffer = s;
  }
  else
  {
    buffer += ";" + s;
  }
}
result.Add(buffer);

foreach (string s in result)
  Console.WriteLine(s);
share|improve this answer
    
It looks like someone went around downvoting correct answers. I'm upvoting any answer I think is correct (especially answers that are downvoted with no explanation) and downvoting the question (because he keeps changing requirements). –  David B Jan 27 '09 at 16:30
    
'Changing the requirements' is part of what this site is all about. Sometimes the questioner doesn't exactly know what or how the question should be asked. Seeing various answers come in helps them to refine the question. –  Aaron Palmer Jan 27 '09 at 17:19
    
Sure, but it's one thing to change the question... another thing to ask, get answers, change, and then downvote the correct answers to the original. –  David B Jan 28 '09 at 2:34

here is another possible solution.

string[] bits = text.Replace(";smtp", "|smtp").Replace(";SMTP", "|SMTP").Replace(";X400", "|X400").Split(new char[] { '|' });

bits[0], bits[1], and bits[2] will then contains the three parts in the order from your original string.

share|improve this answer
    
Obviously, the example as it is will not match 'smtp' at the beginning. I think all the replaces should be without the semicolon, e.g. text.Replace("smtp","|smtp"). Final tidy up on the resulting can have a TrimEnd(';') and the split can be done with RemoveEmptyEntries to get rid of the first blank –  Carl Jan 27 '09 at 16:24
    
my solution tries to cater for the other input string as well, which is X400:C=US;A= ;P=Test;O=Exchange;S=Jack;G=Black;;smtp:jblack@test.com;SMTP:jb@test.com –  mangokun Jan 27 '09 at 16:45
    
So will my altered one, it depends on how important the semicolons are, as yours is removing them. –  Carl Jan 27 '09 at 17:10

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