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I'm trying to avoid the use of the Role Provider and Membership Provider since its way too clumsy in my opinion, and therefore I'm trying to making my own "version" which is less clumsy and more manageable/flexible. Now is my question.. is there an alternative to the Role Provider which is decent? (I know that I can do custom Role provier, membership provider etc.)

By more manageable/flexible I mean that I'm limited to use the Roles static class and not implement directly into my service layer which interact with the database context, instead I'm bound to use the Roles static class which has its own database context etc, also the table names is awful..

Thanks in advance.

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I'm... not quite sure what "UnitOfWork" has to do with user access rights (roles). Isn't that thing more related to transactions than authorization? –  Matti Virkkunen Jan 29 '11 at 13:29
    
@Matti Virkkunen - True, forget that part :) –  ebb Jan 29 '11 at 13:33
2  
Could you elaborate on what you mean by "more manageable/flexible"? Currently it seems you're not even sure about what you want. –  Matti Virkkunen Jan 29 '11 at 13:43
2  
I have this same problem. Dependency injection cant even inject the service layer in the provider because the provider is executed before my DI even get a chance to inject. –  Shawn Mclean Jan 29 '11 at 15:09
7  
+1 for saying providers are clumsy --they feel like the result of a hack-a-ton gone awry. –  EBarr May 24 '11 at 1:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 82 down vote accepted

I'm in the same boat as you - I've always hated the RoleProviders. Yeah, they're great if you want to get things up and running for a small website, but they're not very realistic. The major downside I've always found is that they tie you directly to ASP.NET.

The way I went for a recent project was defining a couple of interfaces that are part of the service layer (NOTE: I simplified these quite a bit - but you could easily add to them):

public interface IAuthenticationService
{
    bool Login(string username, string password);
    void Logout(User user);
}

public interface IAuthorizationService
{
    bool Authorize(User user, Roles requiredRoles);
}

Then your users could have a Roles enum:

public enum Roles
{
    Accounting = 1,
    Scheduling = 2,
    Prescriptions = 4
    // What ever else you need to define here.
    // Notice all powers of 2 so we can OR them to combine role permissions.
}

public class User
{
    bool IsAdministrator { get; set; }
    Roles Permissions { get; set; }
}

For your IAuthenticationService, you could have a base implementation that does standard password checking and then you could have a FormsAuthenticationService that does a little bit more such as setting the cookie etc. For your AuthorizationService, you'd need something like this:

public class AuthorizationService : IAuthorizationService
{
    public bool Authorize(User userSession, Roles requiredRoles)
    {
        if (userSession.IsAdministrator)
        {
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            // Check if the roles enum has the specific role bit set.
            return (requiredRoles & user.Roles) == requiredRoles;
        }
    }
}

On top of these base services, you could easily add services to reset passwords etc.

Since you're using MVC, you could do authorization at the action level using an ActionFilter:

public class RequirePermissionFilter : IAuthorizationFilter
{
    private readonly IAuthorizationService authorizationService;
    private readonly Roles permissions;

    public RequirePermissionFilter(IAuthorizationService authorizationService, Roles requiredRoles)
    {
        this.authorizationService = authorizationService;
        this.permissions = requiredRoles;
        this.isAdministrator = isAdministrator;
    }

    private IAuthorizationService CreateAuthorizationService(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        return this.authorizationService ?? new FormsAuthorizationService(httpContext);
    }

    public void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        var authSvc = this.CreateAuthorizationService(filterContext.HttpContext);
        // Get the current user... you could store in session or the HttpContext if you want too. It would be set inside the FormsAuthenticationService.
        var userSession = (User)filterContext.HttpContext.Session["CurrentUser"];

        var success = authSvc.Authorize(userSession, this.permissions);

        if (success)
        {
            // Since authorization is performed at the action level, the authorization code runs
            // after the output caching module. In the worst case this could allow an authorized user
            // to cause the page to be cached, then an unauthorized user would later be served the
            // cached page. We work around this by telling proxies not to cache the sensitive page,
            // then we hook our custom authorization code into the caching mechanism so that we have
            // the final say on whether or not a page should be served from the cache.
            var cache = filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Cache;
            cache.SetProxyMaxAge(new TimeSpan(0));
            cache.AddValidationCallback((HttpContext context, object data, ref HttpValidationStatus validationStatus) =>
            {
                validationStatus = this.OnCacheAuthorization(new HttpContextWrapper(context));
            }, null);
        }
        else
        {
            this.HandleUnauthorizedRequest(filterContext);
        }
    }

    private void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        // Ajax requests will return status code 500 because we don't want to return the result of the
        // redirect to the login page.
        if (filterContext.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.IsAjaxRequest())
        {
            filterContext.Result = new HttpStatusCodeResult(500);
        }
        else
        {
            filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult();
        }
    }

    public HttpValidationStatus OnCacheAuthorization(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        var authSvc = this.CreateAuthorizationService(httpContext);
        var userSession = (User)httpContext.Session["CurrentUser"];

        var success = authSvc.Authorize(userSession, this.permissions);

        if (success)
        {
            return HttpValidationStatus.Valid;
        }
        else
        {
            return HttpValidationStatus.IgnoreThisRequest;
        }
    }
}

Which you can then decorate on your controller actions:

[RequirePermission(Roles.Accounting)]
public ViewResult Index()
{
   // ...
}

The advantage of this approach is you can also use dependency injection and an IoC container to wire things up. Also, you can use it across multiple applications (not just your ASP.NET one). You would use your ORM to define the appropriate schema.

If you need more details around the FormsAuthorization/Authentication services or where to go from here, let me know.

EDIT: To add "security trimming", you could do it with an HtmlHelper. This probably needs a little more... but you get the idea.

public static bool SecurityTrim<TModel>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> source, Roles requiredRoles)
{
    var authorizationService = new FormsAuthorizationService();
    var user = (User)HttpContext.Current.Session["CurrentUser"];
    return authorizationService.Authorize(user, requiredRoles);
}

And then inside your view (using Razor syntax here):

@if(Html.SecurityTrim(Roles.Accounting))
{
    <span>Only for accounting</span>
}

EDIT: The UserSession would look something like this:

public class UserSession
{
    public int UserId { get; set; }
    public string UserName { get; set; }
    public bool IsAdministrator { get; set; }
    public Roles GetRoles()
    {
         // make the call to the database or whatever here.
         // or just turn this into a property.
    }
}

This way, we don't expose the password hash and all other details inside the session of the current user since they're really not needed for the user's session lifetime.

share|improve this answer
3  
Nothing less than perfect! Just a curious question: How would you check whether a user is in a role in the view? (To render different menu items for a regular User and an Administrator)? –  ebb Jan 29 '11 at 15:18
1  
@ebb - Updated my post. –  TheCloudlessSky Jan 29 '11 at 15:25
1  
@ebb - Yeah it's a rare case but valid. You could either inform the user "Permission changes will not take affect until the user logs in again", or always load the permissions every time they authorize (more hits to the database though). –  TheCloudlessSky Jan 29 '11 at 15:34
1  
@ebb - @ebb - Well inside your authentication service, you would get the User from the unit of work/repository. To me, it feels wrong to store the actual user entity inside the session, so I transform it into a UserSession (where it doesn't keep the password etc). It just knows what it needs to know. So where you see the Session["CurrentUser"], you would set/get a UserSession instead of a User. See my edit above. Make sense? –  TheCloudlessSky Jan 29 '11 at 15:53
1  
@ebb - You'd still need the cookies in FormsAuthenticationService since that would be it's job. UserSession is just like User, but less properties. –  TheCloudlessSky Jan 29 '11 at 16:55

I have implemented a role provider based on @TheCloudlessSky post here. There are few things that I thought I can add and share what I have done. First if you want to use the RequirepPermission class for your action filters as an attribute you need to implement ActionFilterAttribute class for RequirepPermission class.

Interface classes IAuthenticationService and IAuthorizationService

public interface IAuthenticationService
{
    void SignIn(string userName, bool createPersistentCookie);
    void SignOut();
}

public interface IAuthorizationService
{
    bool Authorize(UserSession user, string[] requiredRoles);
}

FormsAuthenticationService class

/// <summary>
/// This class is for Form Authentication
/// </summary>
public class FormsAuthenticationService : IAuthenticationService
{

    public void SignIn(string userName, bool createPersistentCookie)
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(userName)) throw new ArgumentException(@"Value cannot be null or empty.", "userName");

        FormsAuthentication.SetAuthCookie(userName, createPersistentCookie);
    }

    public void SignOut()
    {
        FormsAuthentication.SignOut();
    }
}

UserSession calss

public class UserSession
{
    public string UserName { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<string> UserRoles { get; set; }
}

Another point is FormsAuthorizationServiceclass and how we can assign a user to the httpContext.Session["CurrentUser"]. My Approach in this situation is to create a new instance of userSession class and directly assign the user from httpContext.User.Identity.Name to the userSession variable as you can see in FormsAuthorizationService class.

[AttributeUsageAttribute(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Struct | AttributeTargets.Constructor | AttributeTargets.Method, Inherited = false)]
public class RequirePermissionAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter
{
    #region Fields

    private readonly IAuthorizationService _authorizationService;
    private readonly string[] _permissions;

    #endregion

    #region Constructors

    public RequirePermissionAttribute(string requiredRoles)
    {
        _permissions = requiredRoles.Trim().Split(',').ToArray();
        _authorizationService = null;
    }

    #endregion

    #region Methods

    private IAuthorizationService CreateAuthorizationService(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        return _authorizationService ?? new FormsAuthorizationService(httpContext);
    }

    public void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        var authSvc = CreateAuthorizationService(filterContext.HttpContext);
        // Get the current user... you could store in session or the HttpContext if you want too. It would be set inside the FormsAuthenticationService.
        if (filterContext.HttpContext.Session == null) return;
        if (filterContext.HttpContext.Request == null) return;
        var success = false;
        if (filterContext.HttpContext.Session["__Roles"] != null)
        {
            var rolesSession = filterContext.HttpContext.Session["__Roles"];
            var roles = rolesSession.ToString().Trim().Split(',').ToList();
            var userSession = new UserSession
            {
                UserName = filterContext.HttpContext.User.Identity.Name,
                UserRoles = roles
            };
            success = authSvc.Authorize(userSession, _permissions);
        }
        if (success)
            {
                // Since authorization is performed at the action level, the authorization code runs
                // after the output caching module. In the worst case this could allow an authorized user
                // to cause the page to be cached, then an unauthorized user would later be served the
                // cached page. We work around this by telling proxies not to cache the sensitive page,
                // then we hook our custom authorization code into the caching mechanism so that we have
                // the final say on whether or not a page should be served from the cache.
                var cache = filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Cache;
                cache.SetProxyMaxAge(new TimeSpan(0));
                cache.AddValidationCallback((HttpContext context, object data, ref HttpValidationStatus validationStatus) =>
                                                {
                                                    validationStatus = OnCacheAuthorization(new HttpContextWrapper(context));
                                                }, null);
            }
            else
            {
                HandleUnauthorizedRequest(filterContext);
            }
    }

    private static void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        // Ajax requests will return status code 500 because we don't want to return the result of the
        // redirect to the login page.
        if (filterContext.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.IsAjaxRequest())
        {
            filterContext.Result = new HttpStatusCodeResult(500);
        }
        else
        {
            filterContext.Result = new HttpUnauthorizedResult();
        }
    }

    private HttpValidationStatus OnCacheAuthorization(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        var authSvc = CreateAuthorizationService(httpContext);
        if (httpContext.Session != null)
        {
            var success = false;
            if (httpContext.Session["__Roles"] != null)
            {
                var rolesSession = httpContext.Session["__Roles"];
                var roles = rolesSession.ToString().Trim().Split(',').ToList();
                var userSession = new UserSession
                {
                    UserName = httpContext.User.Identity.Name,
                    UserRoles = roles
                };
                success = authSvc.Authorize(userSession, _permissions);
            }
            return success ? HttpValidationStatus.Valid : HttpValidationStatus.IgnoreThisRequest;
        }
        return 0;
    }

    #endregion
}

internal class FormsAuthorizationService : IAuthorizationService
{
    private readonly HttpContextBase _httpContext;

    public FormsAuthorizationService(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        _httpContext = httpContext;
    }

    public bool Authorize(UserSession userSession, string[] requiredRoles)
    {
        return userSession.UserRoles.Any(role => requiredRoles.Any(item => item == role));
    }
}

then in your controller after the user is authenticated you can get roles from the database and assign it to the roles session:

var roles = Repository.GetRolesByUserId(Id);
if (ControllerContext.HttpContext.Session != null)
   ControllerContext.HttpContext.Session.Add("__Roles",roles);
FormsService.SignIn(collection.Name, true);

After the user is logged out of the system you can clear the session

FormsService.SignOut();
Session.Abandon();
return RedirectToAction("Index", "Account");

The caveat in this model is that, when the user is signed into the system, if a role is assigned to the user, authorization doesn't work unless he logs out and logs back in the system.

Another thing is that there is no need to have a separate class for roles, since we can get roles directly from database and set it into roles session in a controller.

After you are done with implementing all these codes one last step is to bind this attribute to your methods in your controller:

[RequirePermission("Admin,DM")]
public ActionResult Create()
{
return View();
}
share|improve this answer

If you use Castle Windsor Dependency Injection you can inject lists of RoleProviders that can be used to ascertain user rights from any source you choose to implement.

http://ivida.co.uk/2011/05/18/mvc-getting-user-roles-from-multiple-sources-register-and-resolve-arrays-of-dependencis-using-the-fluent-api/

share|improve this answer

You don't need to use a static class for roles. For instance, the SqlRoleProvider allows you to define the roles in a database.

Of course, if you want to retrieve roles from your own service layer, it's not that hard to create your own role provider - there really aren't that many methods to implement.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Matti Virkkunen - What I'm trying to is to make the Role Provider and Membership Provider a part of my ORM mappings, since it will allow me more flexibility. –  ebb Jan 29 '11 at 14:00
2  
@ebb: You're being vague again. What is the concrete thing you want to do? You're free to call any ORM methods from within your provider. –  Matti Virkkunen Jan 29 '11 at 14:03
    
@Matti Virkkunen, At the moment I have a custom service called "UserService.cs" which dosent interact with the Membership Provider anyhow, but just got simple and stupid logic to create/get/delete users. What I'm trying to is to do the same with Role Provider... In theory its possible however I'm going into a wall when it comes to check whether a user is in a certian role since the IPrincipal User.IsInRole() wont know the users roles? –  ebb Jan 29 '11 at 14:09
1  
@ebb: I'd imagine you can make IsInRole work by implementing your own RoleProvider, since it has an IsUserInRole method in it for you to override. –  Matti Virkkunen Jan 29 '11 at 14:12
1  
@Matti Virkkunen, Bound to a table with a weird name, and you'll have to define even more stuff in the web.config to enable the roleprovider and you're bound to only use RoleProviders it looks like.. so thats one more for the list. But as @TheCloudlessSky mentioned then I could just implement a custom provider which only holds logic for the IsUserInRole() method and then just NotImplemented Exceptions for the rest... But thats just odd. –  ebb Jan 29 '11 at 14:28

You can implement your own membership and role providers by overriding the appropriate interfaces.

If you want to start from scratch, typically these types of things are implemented as a custom http module which stores the users credentials either in the httpcontext or the session. Either way you'll probably want to set a cookie with some sort of authentication token.

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Here are some examples of folks implementing their own things. Might help you if you choose to go that route.

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/web-security/AspNetCustomAuth.aspx

http://forums.asp.net/p/1266058/2390281.aspx

http://forums.asp.net/p/1253732/2324459.aspx

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