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Consider the following css and html.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
<head>
    <title>Hover Test</title>
    <style>
        div {
            min-height: 20px;
            margin:20px;
            border: 1px solid #000;
            background-color: #fff;
        }
        div:hover {
           background-color: #000;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div>
        <div>
            <div></div>
            <div></div>
        </div>
        <div>
            <div></div>
            <div></div>
        </div>
    </div>
    <div>
        <div>
            <div></div>
            <div></div>
        </div>
        <div>
            <div></div>
            <div></div>
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

The resulting effect is that it shows the hover effect on all nodes the mouse is over regardless of child nodes.

The effect i am locking for is to show the hover effect on only the nodes the mouse is directly over. That is not show the hover effect on an element when the mouse is over a child node.

Is there a way to this in CSS alone?

If not i guess i could always use onmouseover an onmouseout event handlers and using a css class .hover or similar. Butt I would preferably find a solution that dont mutate the affected dom node and that is easily styleable with CSS.

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1  
i'm curious: what's with <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> in front of an XHTML document –  mauris Jan 29 '11 at 13:34
2  
@thephpdeveloper: XHTML 1.0/1.1 documents served as application/xhtml+xml require the XML declaration to validate. However if you serve them as text/html the XML declaration isn't needed. It's better to leave it out otherwise IE (at least I think IE6) will go into quirks mode. –  BoltClock Jan 29 '11 at 13:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you only want the leaf nodes to gain a black background color, and you can ensure there will only be exactly three levels of nodes, you can do this:

div > div > div:hover {
   background-color: #000;
}

Otherwise you have to use JavaScript to set the background colors of the leaf nodes and their parent nodes.

Here's something using jQuery that works:

$('div').hover(function() {
    $(this).css('background-color', '#000');
    $(this).parents('div').css('background-color', '#fff');
}, function() {
    $(this).css('background-color', '#fff');
    $(this).parent('div').css('background-color', '#000');
});

Preview on jsFiddle

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Ohh I like jsFiddle. Yes the jQuery thing achieves the desired effect. But I need to be abel to style what type of effect to happen with CSS. I could do this by setting classes on nodes instead of direct styles, but that means it will mutate the node wich i very much would like to avoid. –  LeadingLight Jan 29 '11 at 14:19
    
@LeadingLight: Unfortunately, your only options are to use jQuery to apply the styles or use classes. HTML only defines the structure, not style or behavior which are CSS's and JavaScript's specialties respectively. –  BoltClock Jan 29 '11 at 14:21

I guess this is not possible with CSS, because you have to select the parent node of the hovered element, like div:hover < div, but there is no parent selector < in CSS.

But it's easy to do with JavaScript events.

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