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I got a list, programmed like this: public class MyList<T>. Is there any way to use the T variable to get the name of class (so I can, from within MyList, know if T is String, Socket, etc.)?

EDIT: Nevermind, found the answer here.

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You know the answer already, but you may want to look at google-guice.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/javadoc/com/google/inject/… –  maaartinus Jan 29 '11 at 14:51
3  
possible duplicate of how to get class instance of generics type T –  finnw Feb 1 '11 at 21:00
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5 Answers

up vote 36 down vote accepted

The only way I've found to do it is to add a private data member:

public class Foo<T> 
{
    private Class<T> type;

    public Foo(Class<T> type) { this.type = type; } 
}
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You are seeing the result of Type Erasure. From that page...

When a generic type is instantiated, the compiler translates those types by a technique called type erasure — a process where the compiler removes all information related to type parameters and type arguments within a class or method. Type erasure enables Java applications that use generics to maintain binary compatibility with Java libraries and applications that were created before generics.

For instance, Box<String> is translated to type Box, which is called the raw type — a raw type is a generic class or interface name without any type arguments. This means that you can't find out what type of Object a generic class is using at runtime.

This also looks like this question which has a pretty good answer as well.

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I'm not 100% sure if this works in all cases (needs at least Java 1.5):

import java.lang.reflect.Field;
import java.lang.reflect.ParameterizedType;
import java.lang.reflect.Type;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class Main 
{
    public class A
    {   
    }

    public class B extends A
    {       
    }


    public Map<A, B> map = new HashMap<Main.A, Main.B>();

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {

        try
        {
            Field field = Main.class.getField("map");           
            System.out.println("Field " + field.getName() + " is of type " + field.getType().getSimpleName());

            Type genericType = field.getGenericType();

            if(genericType instanceof ParameterizedType)
            {
                ParameterizedType type = (ParameterizedType) genericType;               
                Type[] typeArguments = type.getActualTypeArguments();

                for(Type typeArgument : typeArguments) 
                {   
                    Class<?> classType = ((Class<?>)typeArgument);                  
                    System.out.println("Field " + field.getName() + " has a parameterized type of " + classType.getSimpleName());
                }
            }
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }    
}

This will output:

Field map is of type Map
Field map has a parameterized type of A
Field map has a parameterized type of B

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Once I tried to do similar during refactoring of General DAO, so I went through some similar code samples. Don't remember why, but I decided not to go with such approach (I think it didn't work well in all cases, maybe class hierarchy was mandatory). Your example does work :) +1 P.S. Some extended tutorial I've found: artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=208860 –  Arturs Licis Jan 29 '11 at 14:38
    
I found the original article where I lifted this from (the example above is extracted from one of our work-projects): tutorials.jenkov.com/java-reflection/generics.html#fieldtypes The article says this only works with public-fields, but that's not true, you can access protected and private fields via reflection too (just use getDeclaredField instead of getField) –  esaj Jan 29 '11 at 14:45
1  
This does not answer the question. This gets the type used in declaring a field. How is this relevant? –  newacct Aug 3 '12 at 23:09
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i like the solution from

http://www.nautsch.net/2008/10/28/class-von-type-parameter-java-generics/

public class Dada<T> {

    private Class<T> typeOfT;

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public Dada() {
        this.typeOfT = (Class<T>)
                ((ParameterizedType)getClass()
                .getGenericSuperclass())
                .getActualTypeArguments()[0];
    }
...
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I'm able to get the Class of the generic type this way:

class MyList<T> {
  Class<T> clazz = (Class<T>) DAOUtil.getTypeArguments(MyList.class, this.getClass()).get(0);
}

You need two functions from this file: http://code.google.com/p/hibernate-generic-dao/source/browse/trunk/dao/src/main/java/com/googlecode/genericdao/dao/DAOUtil.java

For more explanation: http://www.artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=208860

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