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I need deferred call of some function with arguments. Have next test code:

#include <functional>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/function.hpp>

struct test
{
    test()
    {
        std::cout << "ctor" << std::endl;
    }

    test& operator=(test const& t)
    {
        std::cout << "operator=" << std::endl;
        return *this;
    }

    test(test const& t)
    {
        std::cout << "copy ctor" << std::endl;
    }

    ~test()
    {
        std::cout << "dtor" << std::endl;
    }
};

int foo(test const & t)
{
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    test t;
    boost::function<int()> f = boost::bind(foo, t);
    f();
    return 0;
}

Output is:

ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
dtor
copy ctor
dtor
dtor
copy ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor

So we can see what copy ctor called 11 times!!!

Ok. Change boost::bind to std::bind:

int main()
{
    test t;
    boost::function<int()> f = std::bind(foo, t);
    f();
    return 0;
}

Output is:

ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
dtor
copy ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor
dtor

Copy ctor called 9 times. Ok. If change boost::function to std::function copy ctor will be called 4 times only. But it is bad behavior too.

Is it possible do this with 1 call of copy ctor? std::ref is a bad idea, because of it can invoke in other thread and etc.

Sorry for my bad English :) Thank you.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use a lambda expression.

int main()
{
    test t;
    std::function<int()> f = [=](){ foo(t); };
    f();
    return 0;
}

Binding is exceedingly redundant due to the incredible ease etc of using lambdas. In addition, you did compile in Release mode with all optimizations on, right?

You won't get only one copy constructor call, because first you have to produce a function object, and then assign that function object into the std::function. Maybe it could be std::move'd?

Since you don't have lambdas and even binding produces three copies, you're just going to have to manually write your own function object in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, Release mode and -O2. std::move is possible in some cases. –  Max Jan 29 '11 at 14:41
    
In MinGW with GCC 4.4 I have error: expected primary-expression before '[' token on std::function<int()> f = [=](){ foo(t); }; :( –  Max Jan 29 '11 at 15:42
    
GCC 4.4 doesn't support lambdas, but you tagged C++0x so I expected that you had lambda support. –  Puppy Jan 29 '11 at 16:35
    
I update my MinGW and it's all Ok! Thank you! –  Max Jan 29 '11 at 17:16
    
No problem. If my answer solved your problem, you should mark it as accepted. –  Puppy Jan 29 '11 at 17:23

Using lambdas is a good answer. If for whatever reason that doesn't work for you, another possibility is storing the result of the bind in something other than a std::function:

decltype(std::bind(foo, t)) f = std::bind(foo, t);

or:

auto f = std::bind(foo, t);

On my system (clang/libc++) this outputs:

ctor
copy ctor
dtor
dtor

Though your milage may vary.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, with MinGW (gcc version 4.4.0 (GCC)) it has 3 calls of copy ctor :( –  Max Jan 29 '11 at 15:00

It does depend a bit on the lifetime of the object that you want to bind.

Assuming that that object's lifetime includes the lifetime of the functor, just do

int main()
{
    test t;
    boost::function<int()> f( boost::bind(foo, boost::ref( t ) ) );
    f();
    return 0;
}

Yields one constructor call and one destructor call. :-)

Cheers & hth.,

share|improve this answer
    
He already said that he can't use a reference because it's multi-threaded. –  Puppy Jan 29 '11 at 16:36
    
@DeadMG: I didn't notice, but, the called function takes argument by ref to const, so, no tread safety problem (well, unless one is added by modifying original object, but then just make one copy). –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 29 '11 at 16:38
    
@Alf: Except t is allocated locally, making a reference to it in a multi-threaded program a death sentence. –  Puppy Jan 29 '11 at 16:46
    
@DeadMG: no, I did address the lifetime issue. second para. :-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 29 '11 at 16:49
    
@Alf: But he already stated that is not the lifetime. Assumptions are great- if the OP didn't already explicitly state otherwise. –  Puppy Jan 29 '11 at 17:15

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