Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to ask you how it should look this code to C++:

<?php
for ($i = 1; $i <= 10; $i++) {
    $array[$i]="test".$i;
}
?>

Thanks :)

share|improve this question
    
May I ask why this question? –  peoro Jan 29 '11 at 14:59
1  
Keep in mind that in C-based languages, arrays normally start at zero, so looping through an array of 10 elements would be for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) array[i] = i; –  Paul Tomblin Jan 29 '11 at 15:05
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It would look something like this (a complete program).

/* required headers */
#include <map>
#include <cstdlib>

/* code has to be inside a function; main is the start-point of the program */
int main() {
  std::map<int, int> array;
  for (int i = 1; i <= 10; ++i) {
    array[i] = i;
  }
  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

I use a map above, since PHP "arrays" are actually like maps in other languages (although completely mimicing their behaviour in a statically-typed language is a hassle). Of course, since the program does little, you could save yourself some typing and not type something that effectively does nothing.

EDIT:

/* required headers */
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <cstdlib>

/* code has to be inside a function; main is the start-point of the program */
int main() {
  std::map<int, std::string> array;
  for (int i = 1; i <= 10; ++i) {
    std::ostringstream stream;
    stream << "test" << i;
    array[i] = stream.str();
  }
  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this answer
    
you might want to see his edited question. –  Doug T. Jan 29 '11 at 15:23
    
It's work. :) Thank you :) –  rammstein Jan 29 '11 at 15:34
add comment
for ( int i=1; i<=10; i++){
   array[i] = i;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Edit based on your edits

Important addition to the other answers that php doesn't require:

#include <sstream>
#include <string>

int main
{
   using namespace std;
   string array[11]; // tell the compiler array is an array of size 11
                     // this array starts at index 0 and goes up to 10
                     // totaling 11 elements
   for ( int i=1; i<=10; i++){  // you might want to start at 0 here
      ostringstream strStream
      strStream << "test" << i;
      array[i] = strStream.str();
   }
   return 0;
}

// accessing array outside the bounds you told the compiler
// results in undefined behavior, practically this means crash
// or data corruption

This is the most direct conversion. However, you probably wish to look into std::map in @eq-'s answer for general associative containers where you don't care if the index space is contiguous and just general safety. C style arrays are considered a code smell these days.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sry <?php for ($i = 1; $i <= 10; $i++) { $array[$i]="test".$i; } ?> –  rammstein Jan 29 '11 at 15:08
    
@rammstein see edits –  Doug T. Jan 29 '11 at 15:16
    
Any other option? In short? –  rammstein Jan 29 '11 at 15:22
    
ostringstream is pretty much the canonical solution for this kind of problem. There's a couple others (lookup itoa), but ostringstream will be the safest. There's boost::lexical_cast, but thats just wraps a stringstream. –  Doug T. Jan 29 '11 at 15:24
    
OK, thank you very much . :) I have problem with the library #include <stringstream>. I use GNU g++ 4.4.4 . –  rammstein Jan 29 '11 at 15:27
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.