Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my system there is Django 1.2.3 installed system wide:

C:\>python -c "import django; print django.get_version()"
1.2.3
C:\>django-admin.py --version
1.2.3

Then there is a virtual environment called venv in C:\dev where I installed Django 1.2.4:

C:\> dev\venv\Scripts\activate.bat
(venv) C:\> python -c "import django; print django.get_version()"
1.2.4
(venv) C:\> django-admin.py --version
1.2.3

My questions:

  1. Why django-admin.py reports version 1.2.3, if the current Python (virtual) environment has django 1.2.4 installed?
  2. How can I use Django's 1.2.4 django-admin.py automatically when venv is active?

Additional info:

  • virtualenv version: 1.5.1, Python version 2.7
  • command used to create venv: C:\dev\> virtualenv --no-site-packages venv
  • (venv) C:\> echo %PATH%

    C:\dev\venv\Scripts; ...other paths...

  • shebang of django-admin.py in venv: #!C:\dev\Scripts\python.exe

Hope you can help, many thanks.

share|improve this question
    
hi, i had similair problem on linux when I tried to use an already exisiting django project with a later installed virtualenv. –  Paul Jan 29 '11 at 15:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

This is because your windows has associated .py extension with the globally installed python.exe. Therefore when you type django-admin.py, even though you're in a virtualenv, the global python is invoked, and it in turn finds your global django installation in its own site-packages. Try python django-admin.py to circumvent the association.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, this is a bad news because Windows prevents me to do things the way I like. Btw, no surprise. Thanks for the nice explanation. –  Paolo Jan 29 '11 at 16:36
    
great, thank you –  Petrunov Aug 24 '12 at 9:57

As shanyu already explained, it is because of *.py file associations made to your Python install executable instead of your virtualenv. However, to answer your second question differently, I solved this problem by creating a django-admin.bat in my virtualenv's Scripts directory. Its contents?

@echo off
python %VIRTUAL_ENV%\Scripts\django-admin.py %*

Now you can use django-admin startproject <project_name>. The necessary PATH and VIRTUAL_ENV environment variables should have already been set correctly by virtualenv when you activated the environment.

share|improve this answer
    
shnyu's solution did not work, but yours did. Thank you very much. –  bvukelic Aug 1 '13 at 8:48

I just typed django-admin, without the .py file extension, and worked for me.

share|improve this answer

I had to point the "global python.exe" to my virtualenv in my project so I created my own activate.cmd

set THE_PATH=c:\my-envs\my-specific-env\Scripts
ftype Python.File="%THE_PATH%\python.exe" %%1 %%*
%THE_PATH%\activate.bat

It changes the the file type association using windows command 'ftype'.

share|improve this answer

I had a similar problem on linux when I tried to use an already exisiting django project with a later installed virtualenv.

Is it possible that django-admin.py of django 1.2.4 is not on your path but that django-admin.py of your django 1.2.3 install is?

That would explain your output from

C:\> dev\venv\Scripts\activate.bat
(venv) C:\> python -c "import django; print django.get_version()"
1.2.4
(venv) C:\> django-admin.py --version
1.2.3

because the python command is on the path of your virtualenv but the django-admin.py file might not be.

As to your second question (assuming my guess above is correct): sym-link the django-admin.py file into your C:\dev\venv\Scripts directory, although I am not sure how that works on windows (are you using Cygwin?).

Of course you can always call it as python C:\path\to\django-admin.py (since the right python version is called) but of course that is a lot of typing.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for your answer. I'm on plain Windows (no Cygwin). django-admin.py is on system path, as shown in point 3 of additional info in my oririnal post. C:\dev\venv\Scripts placed as first path should override system wide Scripts directory (but it doesn't seem so!) –  Paolo Jan 29 '11 at 15:54
    
Hi, ok is the shebang line #!C:\dev\Scripts\python pointing to the correct python version? It seems it might need to be #!C:\dev\venv\Scripts\python, but I am guessing here. –  Paul Jan 29 '11 at 16:26
    
You are right, it should have been #!C:\dev\venv\Scripts\python, sorry it was an error in transcription. Btw, shanyu gave a realistic explanation for the issue ;-( –  Paolo Jan 29 '11 at 16:41

i used Philip Nelson's solution but had to add quotes for spaces in my filename:

python "%VIRTUAL_ENV%\Scripts\django-admin.py" %*

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.