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I am starting to build Silverlight application using MVVM. I have button on a XAML page to enable saving of data on its click I have written following code.

 <Button Content="Save" Grid.Column="2" Grid.Row="3"
                    Command="{Binding Path=SaveCourse}"/>

and in the view model class i have implemnets the following code;

public class SaveCurrentCourse : ICommand
        {
            private MaintenanceFormViewModel viewModel;
            public SaveCurrentCourse(MaintenanceFormViewModel viewModel)
            {
                this.viewModel = viewModel;
                this.viewModel.PropertyChanged += (s, e) =>
                    {
                        if (this.CanExecuteChanged != null)
                        {
                            this.CanExecuteChanged(this, new EventArgs());
                        }
                    };   
            }
            public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
            {
                return this.viewModel.CurrentCourse != null;
            }

            public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;

            public void Execute(object parameter)
            {
                this.viewModel.SaveCourseImplementation();
            }
        }

Which kind of works for my save command. The question I have is if there are multiple buttons on the page then do I have to write the same code as above for each of the button? Can any body suggest a better way?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Microsoft's patterns & practices team offers a library called Prism that simplifies this somewhat. http://compositewpf.codeplex.com/

They provide a class called DelegateCommand that implements ICommand and allows you to pass the method name that you would like executed.

public class Test {
    public Test(){
        SomeCommand = new DelegateCommand<object>(DoSomething);
    }
    public DelegateCommand<object> SomeCommand { get; private set;}
    private void DoSomething(object parameter){
        //Do some stuff
    }
}

You can then bind your controls Command property to SomeCommand. You can also bind CommandParameter to something and it will be passed in as the parameter to the DoSomething method. An additional constructor for DelegateCommand allows you to pass a CanExecute method as a second parameter, that will enable/disable the control. If you need to update the enabled/disabled status of the control you can call DelegateCommand's RaiseCanExecuteChanged() method.

public class Test {
    public Test(){
        SomeCommand = new DelegateCommand<object>(DoSomething, (enabled) => CanSave());
    }
    public DelegateCommand<object> SomeCommand { get; private set;}
    private void DoSomething(object parameter){
        //Do some stuff
    }
    private bool CanSave(){
        if(/*test if the control should be enabled */)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }
    private void DoABunchOfStuff(){
        //something here means the control should be disabled
        SomeCommand.RaiseCanExecuteChanged();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
BTW, all that code is from memory, and obviously the if statement won't compile, but it should be pretty close. –  Adam Jan 29 '11 at 17:19
    
Thanks Adam will try your solution. –  Shailender Singh Jan 30 '11 at 7:01

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