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I have two classes:

MainPanel (where I define some methods) MainThread (where I do a loop with these methods to create a classic game structure)

In the MainPanel class I have this method to capture if a key was pressed

 @Override 
 public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) { 
         switch(keyCode) { 
                 case KeyEvent.KEYCODE_DPAD_UP: 
                         Log.i(TAG,"key up was pressed"); 
                         return true; 
         } 
         return false; 
}

It works right, my question is if it's possible to create the onKeyDown as a proper method and use it in the loop to avoid the listener. The idea is to define a method like this in the MainPanel:

public void myOwnOnKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) { 
     switch(keyCode) { 
             case KeyEvent.KEYCODE_DPAD_UP: 
                     Log.i(TAG,"key up was pressed");
     }
}

And then, call it into my loop on MainThread Class like this...

public class MainThread extends Thread {
//...

public void loop() { 
    Canvas canvas; 
    KeyEvent event; Log.d(TAG, "Starting game loop");

    while (running) {

        this.MainPanel.MyOwnOnKeyDown(keyCode, event); 
        this.MainPanel.moveElements(); 
        this.MailPanel.drawElements(canvas); 
    } 
}

At the following line I don't know how to pass the parameter keyCode...

this.MainPanel.MyOwnOnKeyDown(keyCode, event); 

It's possible to that?

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
I really question your design methodology here. I'd bet on the fact there is a more elegant solution to whatever problem you are trying to solve. –  user432209 Jan 29 '11 at 17:40
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looks like you're trying to author a game or some other similar type of program.

In your main loop, where you're trying to call your own keydown method, you should instead call a method like "handleInput()", and then your implementation of the real Android keydown method should add the event information (keycode, etc.) to a Queue collection. The handleInput() method would then handle all keypresses that have occurred (are in the queue) since the last time around the loop.

Here's an example main-loop of a game:

  public void run() {

    initializeState();

    while (stillRunning) { // stillRunning is a flag that signals the user wants to exit

      while(isPaused() && stillRunning) { // isPaused is a flag that is set in the if the user selects pause
        try {
          sleep(100);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        }
      }
      if(!stillRunning)
        break;

      Canvas c = null;
      try {
        c = surfaceHolder.lockCanvas(null); // the game uses a Surface view for drawing
        synchronized (surfaceHolder) {
          updateState();  // update game entities - such as remove explosions that are finished, etc.
          handleInput(); // handle user input (key presses, screen touches, etc.)
          updatePhysics(); // collision detection, speed changes due to gravity, etc.
          updateAnimations(); // update which frames need to draw for animating entities
          updateSound(); // start/stop any sounds required by new game state/events
          updateVideo(c); // draw the next frame of video
        }
      } finally {
        // do this in a finally so that if an exception is thrown
        // during the above, we don't leave the Surface in an
        // inconsistent state
        if (c != null) {
          surfaceHolder.unlockCanvasAndPost(c);
        }
      }
    }
  }

The class with this loop also has a queue for holding all events coming in from the player:

private ConcurrentLinkedQueue<GameEvent> eventQueue = new ConcurrentLinkedQueue<GameEvent>();

The "GameEvent" class has a timestamp memeber (for when the event occurred). Then there are sub-classes such as KeyGameEvent (for keyboard events) and TouchGameEvent (for screen touches), ScrollGameEvent, LongPressGameEvent (subclass of TouchGameEvent) etc.

Here is an example:

public class KeyGameEvent extends GameEvent {

  public int keyCode;
  public KeyEvent keyEvt;
  public boolean up;

  public KeyGameEvent(int keyCode, boolean keyUp, KeyEvent evt) {
    this.keyCode = keyCode;
    this.up = keyUp;
    this.keyEvt = evt;
  }

}

These GameEvent classes then get instantiated and placed on the queue in the standard Android event handler methods, such as this:

  public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
    KeyGameEvent kge = new KeyGameEvent(keyCode, false, evt);
    eventQueue.add(kge);
    return true;
  }

  public boolean onKeyUp(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
    KeyGameEvent kge = new KeyGameEvent(keyCode, true, evt);
    eventQueue.add(kge);
    return true;
  }

  public void onLongPress(MotionEvent evt) {
    LongPressGestureGameEvent lpe = new LongPressGestureGameEvent(evt);
    eventQueue.add(lpe);
  }

Finally, the handleInput() method looks like this:

  private void handleInput() {

    while(true) {
      GameEvent evt = eventQueue.poll();
      if(evt == null)
        break;

      if(evt instanceof KeyGameEvent) {
        processKeyGameEvent((KeyGameEvent)evt);
      }
      else if(evt instanceof TouchGameEvent) {
        processTouchGameEvent((TouchGameEvent)evt);
      }
      // ... etc. for the different types of events.
    }
  }

The, obviously (I hope) within the methods such as processKeyGameEvent() that are called by handeInput(), you actually examine which keys were pressed/released, and have you game logic do whatever is appropriate for such a key press/release.

If your game is only interested in Keyboard input events (not touch, etc.) then you could forgo creating the GameEvent class hierarchy, and simply place the KeyEvent received by onKeyDown() into the queue.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for response, i'll try this too! –  karse23 Jan 29 '11 at 18:08
    
could you give an example of this please? –  karse23 Jan 29 '11 at 19:21
    
Sure, let me try to include enough code that you can follow it, but little enough that it's not overly large... –  jhouse Jan 29 '11 at 20:39
    
My answer above is now edited to include a fairly verbose example. –  jhouse Jan 29 '11 at 21:03
    
great! thank you again =) –  karse23 Jan 29 '11 at 21:14
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I think what you want to do is set a variable for if a key is active and in your main loop reference that.

eg: In the MainPanel have some class fields such as:

// some constants
static int NONE = 0;
static int UP = 1;
static int DOWN = 2;
static int LEFT = 3;
static int RIGHT = 4;
// state fields
private volatile int movement = NONE;
private volatile boolean jumping = false;

Then your onKeyDown would look similar to:

@Override 
 public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) { 
         switch(keyCode) { 
                 case KeyEvent.KEYCODE_DPAD_UP: 
                         Log.i(TAG,"key up was pressed");
                         movement = UP;
                         return true; 
         } 
         return false; 
}

and onKeyUp would look similar to:

@Override 
 public boolean onKeyDown(int keyCode, KeyEvent event) { 
         switch(keyCode) { 
                 case KeyEvent.KEYCODE_DPAD_UP: 
                         Log.i(TAG,"key up was pressed");
                         movement = NONE;
                         return true; 
         } 
         return false; 
}

and your main loop looks something like:

while (running) {
    if (this.movement == UP) {
         // update stuff
    } else if (this.movement == DOWN) {
         // update other stuff
    } // etc ...
    this.MainPanel.moveElements(); 
    this.MailPanel.drawElements(canvas); 
}

You'll probably need more sophisticated logic for tracking key presses but this separates button events from updates so you can have continuous movement.

share|improve this answer
    
seems to be what I was looking for. thank you very much! =) –  karse23 Jan 29 '11 at 18:07
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