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This is for my first open source project (always been just a contributor, never the creator before.) I'm looking for a license, preferably a common and well respected one, that allows people to use the code for commercial work or in other open source projects. This is a development tool, so people may need to ship some of this code with their own code under another license.

I need either a license that by design, or which contains a clause, that prevents my code from being relicensed under the GPL.

I know there are many people who are fans of the GPL, and I specifically do not want to debate its merits. It should be sufficient to say that the right that allows GPL proponents to make their code viral is the very same right I'm exercising by making my license preclude the use of my code in GPL products. The GPL prevents commercial or closed source derivatives, and I wish to prevent GPL or viral derivatives.

Another member of the site asked a similar question a year ago, and was referred to the FSF's list of incompatible licenses, but that list only concerns itself with the FSF's opinion of whether people should use those licenses, not whether the license prevents using code under the license in GPL derivatives.

I could take an off the shelf license and add a clause, but that would effectively be creating yet another license. I will do this if I need to, but would prefer to use a standard license that prevents any code released under it from making its way into derivatives that are then released under the GPL.

Possibly this is due to a misunderstaning on my part, but I believe the BSD and MIT licenses would allow code to be included in a derivative that was licensed under the GPL -- since they allow code to be used in commercial licenses, and like the GPL, commercial licenses restrict your freedom. (I too wish to allow for commercial or closed source derivatives, just not GPL derivatives.)

Advice appreciated, debate not so much.

Thanks in advance.

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I always loved the legal complexity issues of free or open source software. Isn't it just beautful, that one needs ten pages of legal text to declare something free? –  Dercsár Feb 4 '11 at 13:12
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The GPL does not prevent commercial derivatives. The license specifically allowing selling software "for a fee", and it imposes no restrictions on selling support or warranties. Many companies make a living on GPL software, which shows that you shouldn't confuse "commercial" and "proprietary." –  Matthew Flaschen Mar 23 '11 at 14:22
    
You pretty much can't do it w/o writing a license that references GPL by name. –  Joshua Jan 19 at 20:46

3 Answers 3

a typical license is the OpenSSL license... the SSLEay portion of it (see http://openssl.org/source/license.html ) is basically an old BSD style with this extra notice: "The licence and distribution terms for any publically available version or derivative of this code cannot be changed. i.e. this code cannot simply be copied and put under another distribution licence [including the GNU Public Licence.]"

FWIW, this extra clause has forced GPL-licensed projects relying on OpenSSL to add an exception to their GPL ( see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenSSL#Licensing ) such as in http://svn.climm.org/climm/COPYING See also : How do I write an exception under section 7 of the GPLv3?

The nice effect of this exception is that you are not granting it (the author of a GPL-licensed piece combined with your code would need to add it) and GPL projects can still use your code

So what you could do if you like it simple is: take the BSD http://www.opensource.org/licenses/bsd-license.php or MIT license, and add this notice to it. something like:

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:

* Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright

notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. * Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. * Neither the name of the nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission.

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

The license and distribution terms for any publicly available version or derivative of this code cannot be changed. i.e. this code cannot simply be copied and put under another distribution license [including the GNU Public License.]

/hth IANAL, TINLA

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When the Free Software Foundation writes that a license is incompatible with the GPL, it means that the FSF believes that software distributed under the license cannot lawfully be re-licensed or linked with GPL-covered code. This is because conveying a "covered work" requires that the corresponding machine-readable source code be licensed under the GPL, so if "modifications" are licensed under a license that imposes additional terms on the covered work, then the publisher of the covered work would either violate the GPL or the license of the modifications. Accordingly, if you really want to prevent your source code from being used with GPL-licensed code, then consider picking one of the licenses that the FSF believes to be incompatible with the GPL.

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I think you're trying to explain something useful to me, but I'm missing either a premise or concept that you're using. Where are you quoting "covered work" from? Would a correct summary of your answer be that, if the license imposes any additional terms that are not compatible with GPL, then none of the code can be relicensed under the GPL? –  Agent Smith-Jones Jan 30 '11 at 12:08
    
@Agent: The exact definition of the term "covered work" comes from the GPL, and when I write "corresponding machine-readable source code" and "modifications", I mean exactly what the GPL means when it uses these terms in the license text. Basically what I am saying is that if "modifications" (e.g., an open source library) are licensed under a weakly-copyleft license, i.e. one that imposes terms on a larger work into which it is incorporated, then in order for the larger work to also be a GPL covered work, the license of the modifications must be exactly less restrictive than the GPL. –  Daniel Trebbien Jan 30 '11 at 15:21
    
@Agent: One example of GPL-incompatible additional terms that the license of "modifications" may impose is the Eclipse Public License's requirement that the publisher of a work containing EPL-covered code grant every recipient a license to any patents that they might hold that cover the modifications they have made. Due to this requirement,EPL-covered code cannot lawfully be combined with GPL code because the GPL would require the EPL code to be dual-licensed under the GPL, but the GPL enforces no patent grant provisions. –  Daniel Trebbien Jan 30 '11 at 15:25

How about Mozilla Public License 1.1?

In this article, Tom Hull argues;

The effect of this incompatibility is that if a company releases source code under the MPL, none of that source code can ever be incorporated into GPL programs. Moreover, no GPL-licensed source code can be incorporated into a program containing the MPL source code. This incompatibility is a matter of law: there is no way that one program can satisfy both licenses, so one must choose not to use at least one of the licenses.

You may have to read further to convince yourself, but that may be a good start.

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Does this mean that apache 2 license would serve my needs? (being similar to the MPL?) –  Agent Smith-Jones Mar 12 '11 at 12:54

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