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I have a markdown file with words like [this][], [that][], ... , and [the other][]. I know how to find these words in MacVim, but how do I replace them with [this][1], [that][2], ..., and [the other][n], where n is 26 in my case?

I'll also accept solutions using sed or awk or even Ruby if they prove to be simpler than using MacVim.

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You can do this pretty easily just by using a few vim commands, and a macro:

/\[\]<cr>a1<esc>qqyi[np<C-a>q25@q

That is, search for the string "[]", append the number 1 for the first one. Then start recording a macro. Yank everything inside the [], go to the next match, and paste it. Then increment the number. Stop recording and then replay the macro as many times as you need to. It will increment the number it inserts each time.

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Well, writing a solution to this in Vim is quite possible. I have been using this Incrementor object for a while now for these sort of things:

---8<--- vim code

function! Incrementor(start, step)
  let incrementor = {}
  let incrementor.initial_value = a:start
  let incrementor.value = incrementor.initial_value
  let incrementor.step = a:step
  function incrementor.val() dict
    return self.value
  endfunction
  function incrementor.next() dict
    let self.value += self.step
    return self.value
  endfunction
  function incrementor.reset() dict
    let self.value = self.initial_value
    return self.value
  endfunction
  return incrementor
endfunction

" With the Incrementor function above saved in, say,
" ~/.vim/plugin/incrementor.vim, you can then create incrementors as you need
" them and use them in substitutions, like this:

let inc = Incrementor(0,1)
28,$s/\v\[(\w+)\]\[\]/\="[".submatch(1)."][".inc.next()."]"/

finish

" test case

foo
[this][]
[that][]
[theother][]
bar

Copy that whole code sample right up to the 'bar' at the end in a file and then save it and source it (:so %) to test from within Vim.

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You can edit your post to add things you forgot to mention. – ZyX Jan 31 '11 at 17:10

Give this a try:

awk 'BEGIN{c=1}{for(w=1;w<=NF;w++){s=sub("\\[\\]","["c"]",$w);if(s)c++};print}' inputfile
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Small suggestion: awk 'BEGIN {c=1} {for(w=1;w<=NF;w++){c+=sub("\\[\\]","["c"]",$w)};print}' – Beta Jan 30 '11 at 1:50
    
@Beta: Thanks. I overlooked that. – Dennis Williamson Jan 30 '11 at 4:41
perl -p -i -e 's/(\[.*?\])\[\]/"$1\[".(++$i)."]"/ge' /path/to/file

Vim:

:let g:lastcount=0
:function PlusPlus()
  let g:lastcount+=1
  return g:lastcount
  endfunction
:%g/./s/\V[\.\{-}][\zs\ze]/\=PlusPlus()/g
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If you only have to do it once, and never again, then doing it in an editor is fine. When you have to do it repeatedly then it becomes a major pain to do it manually, and that's when automation needs to kick in.

Without a sample of the text containing the targets it is somewhat like shooting in the dark, however this seems close to your description using Ruby:

text = %{
[Lorem][] ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut
labore [et][] dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco
laboris nisi [ut][] aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in
voluptate velit esse [cillum][] dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat
non proident, sunt in culpa qui [officia deserunt][] mollit anim id est laborum.
}

text.scan(/\[[^\]]+\]\[\]/).each_with_index{ |t, i| text[t] = t.sub('[]', "[#{1 + i}]") }
puts text

# >> 
# >> [Lorem][1] ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut
# >> labore [et][2] dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco
# >> laboris nisi [ut][3] aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in
# >> voluptate velit esse [cillum][4] dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat
# >> non proident, sunt in culpa qui [officia deserunt][5] mollit anim id est laborum.
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If you want to automate things you do in vim, you just write a mapping (or a script for more complex tasks). No pain here, this is why many programmers like vim. – ZyX Jan 29 '11 at 23:16
    
By the way, if you do this in vim, you will be able to easily undo things (with persistent undo: even if you already quit the editor). – ZyX Jan 29 '11 at 23:20
    
I live in vim/gvim/macvim for 99% of my editing at work and home, but I'd still not try to use it as an automation tool. – the Tin Man Jan 30 '11 at 3:35
ruby -p -e \
'begin t=$_.clone; $_.sub! "][]", "][#{@n=@n.to_i+1}]";end until t==$_' \
  < somefile

Or, for the edit-the-file-in-place version:

ruby -i.tmp -p -e \
'begin t = $_.clone; $_.sub! "][]", "][#{@n=@n.to_i+1}]"; end until t == $_' \
somefile
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