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I am trying to implement categories for NSMutableDictionary class with at least two methods: one for NSDictionary that retains (not copies) its keys, and one for NSDictionary that weak references its keys (i.e. does nothing to them).

Values are simply retained in both cases.

Thus, as CFDictionaryRef is said to be toll-free bridged with NSDictionary, I actually do the following:

+ (NSMutableDictionary *)dictionaryWithWeakReferencedKeysForCapacity: (NSUInteger)capacity
{   
    CFDictionaryKeyCallBacks    keyCallbacks    = { 0, NULL, NULL, CFCopyDescription, CFEqual, NULL }; 
    CFDictionaryValueCallBacks  valueCallbacks  = { 0, ___f_KBWS_DICTIONARY_RETAIN_CALLBACK, ___f_KBWS_DICTIONARY_RELEASE_CALLBACK, CFCopyDescription, CFEqual };

    return [(id)CFDictionaryCreateMutable(NULL, capacity, &keyCallbacks, &valueCallbacks) autorelease]; 
}

The second method (for retained keys) looks alike and is not presented here. Scary functions inside the code are:

static const void *___f_KBWS_DICTIONARY_RETAIN_CALLBACK(CFAllocatorRef allocator, const void *value)
{
    id object = (id)value;
    return [object retain];
};

static void ___f_KBWS_DICTIONARY_RELEASE_CALLBACK(CFAllocatorRef allocator, const void *value)
{
    id object = (id)value;
    return [object release];
};

I had to write these myself as soon as I haven't found standard core foundation callbacks for retaining and releasing keys.

I plan to use these categories for dictionaries that will store subclasses NSObjects only. The question is: are these valid callbacks for this case? Is there something wrong in my code besides that?

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a bit OT: you should generally prefix your category methods of NSObject subclasses which have been provided by another developer (such as apple). for example: + (NSMutableDictionary *)kbws_dictionaryWithWeakReferencedKeysForCapacity: (NSUInteger)capacity. also, you'd generally want to provide the hash callback as well. hash codes are very important for cfdictionaries - providing this will be best in most cases because it gives the typical (expected) result. if you provide no hash callback, hash codes are based on address (which is valid behaviour in some cases). –  justin Jan 30 '11 at 5:30
    
thanks for the comment on the topic, Justin; hash codes, yeah, I'm warned about that and will deal a bit later with them :) could you just explain the reason for prefixing method names? –  wh1t3cat1k Jan 30 '11 at 10:28
    
yw. it's the same as the reason for prefixing classnames. objc uses a flat namespace for classes and methods. there's also no means to specify a category method via syntax. therefore, if any binary you load into your app uses the same class or method name, then one of the implementations will be ignored, and somebody won't get the result/effect/implementation they expect from messaging. prefixing reduces the likelihood of this. which method is ignored is undefined (afaik), but you'll probably end up with the first implementation which was loaded into the process. –  justin Jan 30 '11 at 20:17
    
(cont) so any loaded library/plugin or synthesized interface could add this method to the objc runtime, which would result in a collision and the UB is passed to the caller. –  justin Jan 30 '11 at 20:19
    
exhaustively! Thanks! –  wh1t3cat1k Jan 31 '11 at 12:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't see anything wrong with these callbacks, per se. That said, you should be careful about "handing out" NSMutableDictionaries to the "public" that don't behave like normal NSMutableDictionaries.

To elaborate, giving someone an NSMutableDictionary pointer is implicitly making statements about how that object behaves. Having set it up as a CFMutableDictionary, with non-standard callbacks, and casting it by the magic of Toll-Free Bridging compiles, but is setting the consumer up for failure.

More generally, I would say that you can do this with impunity as long as you keep the dictionary private to whatever class owns it. Your code snippet implies that you might be handing this out to "the rest of the world" under the guise of being an NSMutableDictionary, when that's not really the case.

If you've got to hand these instances out, I would recommend making your own custom NSMutableDictionary subclass like "MyWeakRefKeyMutableDictionary" and returning that type explicitly. Then at least if someone treats it like an NSMutableDictionary, they can't say they weren't warned.

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ipmcc, thanks. That's brilliant; sometimes simpler ideas just don't come into my head :) perhaps I'll make use of an excplicit class, indeed. –  wh1t3cat1k Jan 30 '11 at 10:25

I had to write these myself as soon as I haven't found standard core foundation callbacks for retaining and releasing keys.

I think you're after CFRetain and CFRelease. But if you only want to change the key callbacks you can use the standard kCFTypeDictionaryValueCallBacks.

+ (NSMutableDictionary *)dictionaryWithWeakReferencedKeysForCapacity: (NSUInteger)capacity
{   
    CFDictionaryKeyCallBacks    keyCallbacks    = { 0, NULL, NULL, CFCopyDescription, CFEqual, NULL }; 

    return [(id)CFDictionaryCreateMutable(NULL, capacity, &keyCallbacks, &kCFTypeDictionaryValueCallBacks) autorelease]; 
}
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