Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First of all, I'm not a very experienced programmer. I'm using Delphi 2009 and have been working with sets, which seem to behave very strangely and even inconsistently to me. I guess it might be me, but the following looks like there's clearly something wrong:

unit test;

interface

uses
Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
Dialogs, StdCtrls;

type
TForm1 = class(TForm)
  Button1: TButton;
  Edit1: TEdit;
  procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
private
    test: set of 1..2;
end;

var Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  test := [3];
  if 3 in test then
    Edit1.Text := '3';
end;

end.

If you run the program and click the button, then, sure enough, it will display the string "3" in the text field. However, if you try the same thing with a number like 100, nothing will be displayed (as it should, in my opinion). Am I missing something or is this some kind of bug? Advice would be appreciated!

EDIT: So far, it seems that I'm not alone with my observation. If someone has some inside knowledge of this, I'd be very glad to hear about it. Also, if there are people with Delphi 2010 (or even Delphi XE), I would appreciate it if you could do some tests on this or even general set behavior (such as "test: set of 256..257") as it would be interesting to see if anything has changed in newer versions.

share|improve this question
    
just use an enumerated type and you'll be free of this odd behaviour –  David Heffernan Jan 30 '11 at 8:40
    
Well, that's true, but in the project I actually encountered this, it would be pointless since I'd be naming my values "One, Two, Three..." etc. - the values represented the actual numbers xD –  Socob Jan 30 '11 at 18:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I was curious enough to take a look at the compiled code that gets produced, and I figured out the following about how sets work in Delphi 2010. It explains why you can do test := [8] when test: set of 1..2, and why Assert(8 in test) fails immediately after.

How much space is actually used?

An set of byte has one bit for every possible byte value, 256 bits in all, 32 bytes. An set of 1..2 requires 1 byte but surprisingly set of 100..101 also requires one byte, so Delphi's compiler is pretty smart about memory allocation. On the othter hand an set of 7..8 requires 2 bytes, and set based on a enumeration that only includes the values 0 and 101 requires (gasp) 13 bytes!

Test code:

TTestEnumeration = (te0=0, te101=101);
TTestEnumeration2 = (tex58=58, tex101=101);

procedure Test;
var A: set of 1..2;
    B: set of 7..8;
    C: set of 100..101;
    D: set of TTestEnumeration;
    E: set of TTestEnumeration2;
begin
  ShowMessage(IntToStr(SizeOf(A))); // => 1
  ShowMessage(IntToStr(SizeOf(B))); // => 2
  ShowMessage(IntToStr(SizeOf(C))); // => 1
  ShowMessage(IntToStr(SizeOf(D))); // => 13
  ShowMessage(IntToStr(SizeOf(E))); // => 6
end;

Conclusions:

  • The basic model behind the set is the set of byte, with 256 possible bits, 32 bytes.
  • Delphi determines the required continuous sub-range of the total 32 bytes range and uses that. For the case set of 1..2 it probably only uses the first byte, so SizeOf() returns 1. For the set of 100.101 it probably only uses the 13th byte, so SizeOf() returns 1. For the set of 7..8 it's probably using the first two bytes, so we get SizeOf()=2. This is an especially interesting case, because it shows us that bits are not shifted left or right to optimize storage. The other interesting case is the set of TTestEnumeration2: it uses 6 bytes, even those there are lots of unusable bits around there.

What kind of code is generated by the compiler?

Test 1, two sets, both using the "first byte".

procedure Test;
var A: set of 1..2;
    B: set of 2..3;
begin
  A := [1];
  B := [1];
end;

For those understand Assembler, have a look at the generated code yourself. For those that don't understand assembler, the generated code is equivalent to:

begin
  A := CompilerGeneratedArray[1];
  B := CompilerGeneratedArray[1];
end;

And that's not a typo, the compiler uses the same pre-compiled value for both assignments. CompiledGeneratedArray[1] = 2.

Here's an other test:

procedure Test2;
var A: set of 1..2;
    B: set of 100..101;
begin
  A := [1];
  B := [1];
end;

Again, in pseudo-code, the compiled code looks like this:

begin
  A := CompilerGeneratedArray1[1];
  B := CompilerGeneratedArray2[1];
end;

Again, no typo: This time the compiler uses different pre-compiled values for the two assignments. CompilerGeneratedArray1[1]=2 while CompilerGeneratedArray2[1]=0; The compiler generated code is smart enough not to overwrite the bits in "B" with invalid values (because B holds information about bits 96..103), yet it uses very similar code for both assignments.

Conclusions

  • All set operations work perfectly well IF you test with values that are in the base-set. For the set of 1..2, test with 1 and 2. For the set of 7..8 only test with 7 and 8. I don't consider the set to be broken. It serves it's purpose very well all over the VCL (and it has a place in my own code as well).
  • In my opinion the compiler generates sub-optimal code for set assignments. I don't think the table-lookups are required, the compiler could generate the values inline and the code would have the same size but better locality.
  • My opinion is that the side-effect of having the set of 1..2 behave the same as set of 0..7 is the side-effect of the previous lack of optimization in the compiler.
  • In the OP's case (var test: set of 1..2; test := [7]) the compiler should generate an error. I would not classify this as a bug because I don't think the compiler's behavior is supposed to be defined in terms of "what to do on bad code by the programmer" but in terms of "what to do with good code by the programmer"; None the less the compiler should generate the Constant expression violates subrange bounds, as it does if you try this code:

(code sample)

procedure Test;
var t: 1..2;
begin
  t := 3;
end;
  • At runtime, if the code is compiled with {$R+}, the bad assignment should raise an error, as it does if you try this code:

(code sample)

procedure Test;
var t: 1..2;
    i: Integer;
begin
  {$R+}
  for i:=1 to 3 do
    t := i;
  {$R-}
end;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for SizeOf(set of 100..101) = 1 –  user246408 Jan 30 '11 at 13:09
    
@Cosmin Prund: That's what I've thought, only my answer would have been shorter, something along the lines of what Serg and Ken Bourassa have said. So your answer is much more elaborated and I find the part about memory sizes especially useful for myself. However, this bit seems to have got a mistake in it: tex58=0. It was meant to be tex58=58, right? –  Andriy M Jan 30 '11 at 13:23
    
@Andriy M: yes, it was supposed to be 58. Fixed. –  Cosmin Prund Jan 30 '11 at 13:28
    
@Cosmin Prund: First of all, thank you very much for your time and effort - it's exactly the kind of answer I was looking for. I agree that the compiler should give an error in that case; that's my main problem with the whole thing (yes, I'm pedantic like that). I also think I understand why "s: set of 256..257" doesn't work now. Wouldn't it be possible if the 32 bytes could stand for more values than those corresponding to a Byte (i.e. 0-255) by using alignment optimization? If they implemented that, I think sets would be a lot more useful than they are now. –  Socob Jan 30 '11 at 17:55
    
@Socob: Of course different set implementations are possible, with different trades between space efficiency, speed, developer comfort. For now Delphi's set is what it is, and I doubt improving it is on anyone's agenda. –  Cosmin Prund Jan 30 '11 at 19:48

According to the official documentation on sets (my emphasis):

The syntax for a set constructor is: [ item1, ..., itemn ] where each item is either an expression denoting an ordinal of the set's base type

Now, according to Subrange types:

When you use numeric or character constants to define a subrange, the base type is the smallest integer or character type that contains the specified range.

Therefore, if you specify

type
  TNum = 1..2;

then the base type will be byte (most likely), and so, if

type
  TSet = set of TNum;
var
  test: TSet;

then

test := [255];

will work, but not

test := [256];

all according to the official specification.

share|improve this answer
2  
If that part on subrange types is actually how it works, then, frankly, it sort of sucks. I mean, it defies the point of using subranges instead of basic types to begin with. Moreover, "test := [256]" will never work because a set can only have values from 0 to 255. If you try "test: set of 256..257", you will get a compiler error saying "Sets can only have 256 elements at most" or something to that effect, which also sounds like a bug to me - evidently, the range only contains two elements. Because of this, the "smallest integer type" would always be Byte. Very strange. –  Socob Jan 29 '11 at 23:08
    
@Socob: Yes, that is right, so the part about "smallest integer type" is very valid for subranges, but quite irrelevant when it comes to sets of such. Nevertheless, I think there is a reason why they use the word "base type" at both pages, so I think everything does indeed work according to the specs. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jan 29 '11 at 23:10
    
Also, if the base type really was Byte, then why does "test := [8]" not work? –  Socob Jan 29 '11 at 23:10
    
@Socob: That does work. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jan 29 '11 at 23:12
1  
What? It doesn't for me. Are you also using Delphi 2009? And yes, it would be according to the specs, but my point was that the specs themselves would be pointless in that case. They should've just said "the base type of an integer (subrange) set is Byte" if that was intentional. –  Socob Jan 29 '11 at 23:14

I have no "inside knowledge", but the compiler logic seems rather transparent.

First, the compiler thinks that any set like set of 1..2 is a subset of set of 0..255. That is why set of 256..257 is not allowed.

Second, the compiler optimizes memory allocation - so it allocates only 1 byte for set of 1..2. The same 1 byte is allocated for set of 0..7, and there seems to be no difference between the both sets on binary level. In short, the compiler allocates as little memory as possible with alignment taken into account (that means for example that compiler never allocates 3 bytes for set - it allocates 4 bytes, even if set fits into 3 bytes, like set of 1..20).

There is some inconsistency in a way the compiler treats sets, which can be demonstrated by the following code sample:

type
   TTestSet = set of 1..2;
   TTestRec = packed record
     FSet: TTestSet;
     FByte: Byte;
   end;

var
  Rec: TTestRec;

procedure TForm9.Button3Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Rec.FSet:= [];
  Rec.FByte:= 1;           // as a side effect we set 8-th element of FSet
                           //   (FSet actually has no 8-th element - only 0..7)
  Assert(8 in Rec.FSet);   // The assert should fail, but it does not!
  if 8 in Rec.FSet then    // another display of the bug
    Edit1.Text := '8';
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Along with Cosmin Prunds explanation, your post seems logical to me. However, I don't quite understand what's going on in your last code example - maybe it's related to the fact that the record is packed? (random guess...) –  Socob Jan 30 '11 at 18:04

A set is stored as a number and can actually hold values that are not in the enumeration on which the set is based. I would expect an error, at least when Range Checking is on in the compiler options, but this doesn't seem to be the case. I'm not sure if this is a bug or by design though.

[edit]

It is odd, though:

type
  TNum = 1..2;
  TSet = set of TNum;

var
  test: TSet;
  test2: TNum;

test2 := 4;  // Not accepted
test := [4]; // Accepted
share|improve this answer
1  
Well, I also thought that it could just hold more numbers, but that doesn't always seem to apply. As I said, if you try to insert 100 into the set, nothing happens (not even an error). Besides, even if it'd be possible theoretically, it shouldn't actually let me do it and enter a number if that'd go against the declaration. You could just declare every set as "set of Byte" then. Your example seems to confirm my suspicion that this is unintentional. –  Socob Jan 29 '11 at 22:50
1  
You can replace [4] with [7] and it will still show the message. It won't with [8]. That indeed suggests that a byte is used where each bit from 0 to 7 indicates a value from the enumeration or range. I don't know if and how this is documented, nor how other versions behave (oh well, I do, since I'm using XE and you're using 2009). But I would indeed call this a bug. –  GolezTrol Jan 29 '11 at 22:54
    
Yeah, my guess is also that it's related to how the set is stored internally, i.e. how much space is actually available to the set. A set can only have values from 0 to 255, so I would've guessed that you can just enter any of those numbers regardless of the declaration, but it seems that's not all there is to it... –  Socob Jan 29 '11 at 22:57
    
I assume it is some kind of optimization that the set is a Byte because 1..2 is within the byte range. Unfortuntely I can only guess. I don't know how exactly this works and I admit I'm not capable of reverse engineering the compiler. :) –  GolezTrol Jan 29 '11 at 23:19

From the top of my head, this was a side effect of allowing non contiguous enumeration types.

The same holds for .NET bitflags: because in both cases the underlying types are compatible with integer, you can insert any integer in it (in Delphi limited to 0..255).

--jeroen

share|improve this answer
1  
I just wish it wasn't limited to 0..255 - I'd even be able to get over the slight inconsistencies then. –  Socob Jan 30 '11 at 18:05
1  
That goes back a long while: backward compatibility back to the point when set types were introduced in Turbo Pascal 1. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Jan 31 '11 at 7:32
    
Correct me if I'm wrong, but sets were actually introduced in the original Pascal. –  Andriy M Jan 31 '11 at 8:47
1  
You are right, but the Turbo Pascal implementation imposes the limitation. GNU Pasal for instance doesn't: gnu-pascal.de/gpc/Set-Types.html –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Jan 31 '11 at 10:36

As far as I'm concerned, no bugs there.

For exemple, take the following code

var aByte: Byte;
begin
  aByte := 255;
  aByte := aByte + 1;
  if aByte = 0 then
    ShowMessage('Is this a bug?');
end;

Now, you can get 2 result from this code. If you compiled with Range Checking TRUE, an exception will be raise on the 2nd line. If you did NOT compile with Range Checking, the code will execute without any error and display the message dialogs.

The situation you encountered with the sets is similar, except that there is no compiler switch to force an exception to be raised in this situation (Well, as far as I know...).

Now, from your exemple:

private         
  test: set of 1..2;  

That essentially declare a Byte sized set (If you call SizeOf(Test), it should return 1). A byte sized set can only contain 8 elements. In this case, it can contains [0] to [7].

Now, some exemple:

begin
  test := [8]; //Here, we try to set the 9th bit of a Byte sized variable. It doesn't work
  Test := [4]; //Here, we try to set the 5th bit of a Byte Sized variable. It works.      
end;

Now, I need to admit I would kind of expect the "Constant expression violates subrange bounds" on the first line (but not on 2nd)

So yeah... there might be a small issue with the compiler.

As for your result being inconsistent... I'm pretty sure using set values out of the set's subrange values isn't guaranteed to give consistent result over different version of Delphi (Maybe not even over different compiles... So if your range is 1..2, stick with [1] and [2].

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that one should just code properly to avoid errors like this, but it's just more consistent; I mean, "var b: Byte; ... b := 256" doesn't work, either. You might argue that this is a subjective issue, but still... –  Socob Jan 30 '11 at 18:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.