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Title more or less says it all. Based on this article, I've come up with this:

public static unsafe void Replace(this MethodBase destination, MethodBase source)
{
    IntPtr srcHandle = source.MethodHandle.GetFunctionPointer();
    IntPtr dstHandle = destination.MethodHandle.GetFunctionPointer();

    int* dstPtr = (int*)dstHandle.ToPointer();
    *dstPtr = srcHandle.ToInt32();
}

This actually works... occasionally -.-

For example, this works.

public static class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MethodInfo methodA = typeof(Program).GetMethod("A", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static);
        MethodInfo methodB = typeof(Program).GetMethod("B", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static);

        methodA.Replace(methodB);

        A();
        B();
    }

    public static void A()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hai World");
    }

    public static void B()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Bai World");
    }
}

However, this doesn't (SEHException). All I did was change the order in which the functions were defined.

public static class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MethodInfo methodA = typeof(Program).GetMethod("A", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static);
        MethodInfo methodB = typeof(Program).GetMethod("B", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static);

        methodA.Replace(methodB);

        A();
        B();
    }

    public static void B()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Bai World");
    }

    public static void A()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hai World");
    }
}

As for the code in the article... I couldn't get it to work at all.

Any ideas/alternatives?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to do this? This sounds like a horrible idea. –  Amy Jan 29 '11 at 22:12
2  
Don't worry - nothing malicious. Just for the sake of knowledge :D –  YellPika Jan 29 '11 at 22:15
    
I believe that the only safe way to do this is to inject the code before the assembly is loaded. –  Porges Jan 30 '11 at 1:02
    
@Porges, perhaps, but I think it wiser to assume this is never safe. Ever. –  Amy Jan 30 '11 at 1:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is making a lot of bad assumptions which will bite you in the ass.

First things first, the structure returned via reflection is not guaranteed, in any way, to point to any runtime structures at all. As such attempting to modify the pointers it contains or returns is just plain wrong.

Secondly, if you wish to do something like injecting pre/post method call invariants (as an example) then you should probably construct runtime proxy objects and inject those instead. Or use dynamic method construction through the Emit namespace. Attempting to manipulate things through undocumented/unknown behaviors (such as the above code) just wont work.

You also need to realize that the JIT decides when it will run. Sometimes it runs against an entire class, and sometimes it just runs against a single method. Your code makes no attempt at determining if the method has been JITted yet, and blindly assumes that the function pointer returned can be modified.

share|improve this answer
    
I love the name and I loved the show. Have a nice day! –  Amy Jan 29 '11 at 22:49
    
In that case... a) So what exactly does it point to then? b) How do I figure out if a method has been JITted? –  YellPika Jan 29 '11 at 23:51
    
b) you can't, unless the program was processed through NGen before execution. –  Amy Jan 30 '11 at 0:17
    
The simple answer is: You don't know what it points to. It is just a pointer, it has uses, but changing it is an undefined and error prone operation and should NEVER be done. You can tell if a method has been JITted through the use of the debugging interfaces. However, that still doesn't change the fact that the pointer is NOT something you should fiddle with. –  Washu Jan 30 '11 at 1:48
    
So what should I be fiddling with instead? –  YellPika Jan 30 '11 at 1:58

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