Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is how I setup my database for an application (in Flask):

from sqlalchemy.engine import create_engine
from sqlalchemy.orm import scoped_session, create_session
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base

engine = None
db_session = scoped_session(lambda: create_session(bind=engine,
                                                   autoflush=False, autocommit=False, expire_on_commit=True))

Base = declarative_base()
Base.query = db_session.query_property()

def init_engine(uri, **kwargs):
    global engine
    engine = create_engine(uri, **kwargs)

    Base.metadata.create_all(bind=engine)

    return engine

If I connect to a file database that has had tables created already, everything works fine, but using sqlite:///:memory: as a target database gives me:

OperationalError: (OperationalError) no such table: users u'DELETE FROM users' ()

when querying like so for ex.:

UsersTable.query.delete()
db_session.commit()

I am accessing this code from a unit test. What is the problem?

Thanks

Edit:

Working setup of the application:

app = Flask(__name__)
app.config.from_object(__name__)
app.secret_key = 'XXX'

# presenters
from presenters.users import users

# register modules (presenters)
app.register_module(users)

# initialize the database
init_engine(db)
share|improve this question
    
What's the output if you add "print Base.metadata.tables.keys()" just before .create_all() ? –  jd. Feb 1 '11 at 15:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The code you posted doesn't contain any table/class declaration. Are you sure that the declaration is done before init_engine() is called?

share|improve this answer
    
You are quite right! I have updated the question with the 'correct' order of execution. Thanks @jd –  Radek Jan 31 '11 at 19:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.