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I want to send a string "Hello there", but I only get "re". Why is that?

void Accept()
{
    SOCKADDR_IN sock;
    int intsock = sizeof(sock);
    remoteSocket = ::accept(desc, (LPSOCKADDR)&sock,  &intsock);
    if(remoteSocket == -1)
    {
        cout << "Error in Accept()" << endl;
    }
    HandleConnection();
}

void HandleConnection()
{
    cout << "You are connected !!!" << endl;
    char* temp = new char[20];
    Recv(temp);
    cout << temp << endl;
}

void Send(const char* buffer)
{
    if((::send(remoteSocket, buffer, strlen(buffer), 0)) < 0)
    {
        cout << "Error in Send()" << endl;
    }
}

void Recv(char* buffer)
{
    int n = 0;
    while((n = ::recv(remoteSocket, buffer, strlen(buffer), 0)) 0)
    {
        buffer[n] = 0;
    }
}

~Server()
{
    WSACleanup();
}

};

int main()
{
    Server s;
    s.Initialize();
    s.Socket();
    s.Bind();
    s.Listen();
    while(1)
    {
        s.Accept();
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
The code you posted does not compile. For example, you've got a destructor (~Server) outside of a class definition. –  Billy ONeal Jan 30 '11 at 1:14
    
strlen goes in an infinite loop ifyou forget to escape the string with \0 on the end. Also, have you tried using select()? Using that you can wait till you have received some data. On a TCP socket recv() will return as much as the supplied buffer can hold –  Antwan van Houdt Jan 30 '11 at 1:18
    
Another problem (other than the one by Marlon): HandleConnection() uses new without delete. Then again, there's no reason you need to new here. You could use a stack variable instead. –  user568493 Jan 30 '11 at 1:19
    
@Antwan: not precisely infinite - there's usually a zero byte somewhere in memory that stops it from reading any further. But you're right - the OP is invoking ill-defined or undefined behaviour with the use of strlen() in that context. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 '11 at 1:20
1  
@Antwan: No, recv will block until it receives some data or the socket is closed. If it receives less data than you asked for, it will return a short read instead of blocking until you get as much data as you asked for. –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 30 '11 at 2:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Despite the destructor problem pointed by @Billy ONeal, you're doing recv() in a loop, but each time you're overwriting the received buffer. I believe you want something like this:

// Pass buffer and its real size. This function takes care of NULL termination.
size_t Recv(char* buffer, size_t size) {
    size_t total = 0, n = 0;
    while((n = ::recv(remoteSocket, buffer+total, size-total-1, 0)) > 0) {
        total += n;
    }
    buffer[total] = 0;
    return total;
}

int main() {
    char buffer[128];
    // Connect or whatever (and set your global remoteSocket)
    Recv(buffer, sizeof(buffer));
    cout << buffer << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
shouldn't it be if (total > 0) buffer[total - 1] = 0;? –  user568493 Jan 30 '11 at 1:29
    
He is overwriting the received buffer while calling strlen(buffer) each time in a loop, so each call to strlen(buffer) would get smaller and smaller if the messages get smaller and smaller –  Marlon Jan 30 '11 at 1:33
    
@bstn: The condition makes sense if the socket is non-blocking. The recv function returns how many bytes it has read. If it read 10 bytes, then we stored 10 bytes into buffer (buffer[0] to buffer[9]), and set the 10th byte to 0. The caller is responsible for passing buffer size - 1 to this function. –  jweyrich Jan 30 '11 at 1:34
    
Sorry for misunderstood,i just post some part of the code,from a Server class,thats why that destructor apears there,but my problem is that if i use sizeof(buffer) for send,it always send 4 bytes –  vBx Jan 30 '11 at 1:38
    
@vBx the problem that it sends 4 bytes is because you are on a 32-bit machine and pointers are 32-bits long (32-bits = 4 bytes). You have to pass 20 to your Recv function and use it in recv. –  Marlon Jan 30 '11 at 1:43

I think the problem is this line of code while((n = ::recv(remoteSocket, buffer, strlen(buffer), 0)) 0)

You are using strlen(buffer) to get the size of the buffer which is incorrect, you should be passing sizeof(buffer) to your Recv function.

If that is not the problem then it is one of the problems :P

Edit:

As pointed out by Kitsune and Mark, sizeof(buffer) would return 4 or 8 bytes since it is allocated on the heap and is simply a pointer to a block of memory. If you choose to use the stack (char buffer[20] instead of new char[20]), you could pass sizeof(buffer) to your Recv function. Otherwise, just use a hardcoded 20.

This is what your code should look like:

void HandleConnection()
{
    cout << "You are connected !!!" << endl;
    char temp[20]; // <-- now we have an array
    Recv(temp, sizeof(temp)); // <-- sizeof(temp) will give us 20, not 4 anymore
    cout << temp << endl;
}

Recv(char* buffer, size_t buffer_size)
{
    recv(remoteSocket, buffer, buffer_size, 0);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
sizeof(buffer) is 4 or 8 (32/64b). You will need to put the known size of the buffer. Either pass a size in, locally allocate an array (in tis case sizeof will be the actual size), or use some other type (a vector<char> could work...) –  KitsuneYMG Jan 30 '11 at 1:22
    
I think that sizeof(buffer) in that context would simply be 4 (or 8 if 64-bit architecture). The buffer size would probably need to be passed in from the calling method. But +1 for spotting the problem. –  Mark Wilkins Jan 30 '11 at 1:22
    
Yes,thats how it looks now:) thanks Marlon –  vBx Jan 30 '11 at 2:06

You need to specify how big the buffer that receives the data is - it is not strlen(buffer).

You can use sizeof(buffer) if the buffer array is defined locally as an array (not in the parameter list), or if the buffer is a global or file scope array whose definition is visible in the function. Otherwise, you need to use an extra buffer size parameter that you pass to the Recv() function - that is, if the buffer is defined in another function, or if it is dynamically allocated. (In the code, the array definition is not visible in Recv(), so you need to ensure that Recv() knows the size somehow - either as an explicit extra argument, or because you wrap the buffer up in an appropriate class that includes a method that tells you how much space is allocated to the buffer it holds.

Of course, the code as shown doesn't compile because buffer isn't actually defined or declared anywhere.

share|improve this answer
    
buffer its the function argument –  vBx Jan 30 '11 at 1:42
    
@vBx - how did I miss that? –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 '11 at 1:47
    
@ Jonathan Leffler: still if i use sizeof(argument), i get 4 –  vBx Jan 30 '11 at 1:56
    
That's because buffer is passed as a pointer, and you're working on a 32-bit machine where the size of a pointer is 4 bytes. You have to pass the size of the allocated buffer in as a separate argument. Classically (think C), you'd use void Recv(char *buffer, size_t buflen); (although I'd recommend having Recv() return a status). In the call, that extra argument would be 20 (since you allocated 20 bytes for the data). Or you can use a C++ class that knows how much space is allocated to it, and take the length from that. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 '11 at 2:18

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