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In MySQL, is there an easy way for the following:

  • On creation, both created_date and updated_date are set to the same TIMESTAMP
  • On subsequent edits, updated_date is changed to the CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

Why is only one field allowed to use the CURRENT_TIMESTAMP as its default value? Why can't I have one default to the CURRENT_TIMESTAMP and the other use it only on update?

If I use now() for created_date and on update CURRENT_TIMESTAMP for updated_date, will they be the same on the creation of a row?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's just the way it is :)

But seriously, it's usually easier (less surprises) when you set those dates explicitly with 'now()' when you create/update the row.

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If I use now() for created_date and on update CURRENT_TIMESTAMP for updated_date, will they be the same on the creation of a row? –  Peter Jan 30 '11 at 1:56
    
Haven't tested it, but I would say so. –  Harmen Jan 30 '11 at 2:02
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I believe ON UPDATE only triggers when an UPDATE command is ran for a row. Setting DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP is what gives it the current timestamp on INSERT –  Kautiontape Jan 30 '11 at 2:02

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