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Is there an ISO standard address format? I can't seem to find one, and I'd like to know for object- and database-design purposes.

(One interesting document that shows a bunch of formats is this: http://www.bitboost.com/ref/international-address-formats.html, but it's insane!)

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Given the variety of formats in use, I can't imagine an ISO standard for it getting passed, and even if one did it clearly wouldn't mean much. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 30 '11 at 3:31
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No; each country defines its own standard.

There have been a number of questions about this in times past, including:

The second of those itself has references to a number of other SO questions.

You might want to check out the grandiosely named Universal Postal Union and its standards.

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I did come across the UPU site in searching around, but I was intimidated by it. "Grandiose" is apt. I don't suppose you could point me towards a page on the site that I should read? –  anonymous Jan 30 '11 at 4:15
    
See SO 929684, which is referenced from the second question above. Also here under the UPU web site. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 '11 at 5:25

Check out the address below.

Address standards A collection of information on address standards ISO 19160, Addressing

http://www.isotc211.org/address/iso19160.htm

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Your post is interesting, although the draft has barely made it beyond the basic-structure level. As it stands, it's of no help. –  likeitlikeit Sep 17 '13 at 19:26

There are none. However, you can also consider that place is usually contained in a bigger place. So, you can also use the hierarchical structure of places in following an address format. Which also means it differs from country-to-country.

You can read stuffs about this on Universal Postal Union's paper Adressing the world, an address for everyone and the place ontology from schema.org

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