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Is there a way to define a method in an interface where implementations can be typed to the implementing class? Here's a concrete example of my initial attempt to solve it, but I'll point out where it fails.

public interface ErrorMeasurable<T extends ErrorMeasurable<T>> {
     // I want every implementation of this method to accept
     // the implementing type as a parameter. I'm willing to accept
     // that programmers can maliciously type it to something else
     // that meets the type boundary.  I'm not willing to accept
     // polymorphic usage to be verbose or strange as the below example shows.
     boolean approxEquals(T that);
}

// This works...
public class MyDecimal implements ErrorMeasurable<MyDecimal> {
     boolean approxEquals(MyDecimal that) { ... }
}

// But polymorphism doesn't work well... 
public interface MyNumber<T extends ErrorMeasurable<T>> implements ErrorMeasurable<T> {
     boolean approxEquals(T that) { ... }
}

public class MyDecimal2 implements MyNumber<MyDecimal> {
     boolean approxEquals(MyDecimal that) { ... }
}

public class UsesNumbers {

     // PROBLEM 1: the type parameter is unbound.
     MyNumber rawNumber1, rawNumber2;

     // PROBLEM 2: This binds the type parameter but it is hard to understand why its typed to itself
     MyNumber<MyNumber> boundNumber1, boundNumber2;

     void example() {
          // PROBLEM 3: There will be a compiler warning about the raw types.
          rawNumber1.approxEquals(rawNumber2);

          // Works without warnings, see PROBLEM 2 though.
          boundNumber1.approxEquals(boundNumber2);
     }
}
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1  
You know, "not a real question" =/= "I don't understand the question". –  JUST MY correct OPINION Jan 30 '11 at 6:36
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think what you want can be done with the current level of generics in Java.

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You cannot do anything about stopping others using generics as raw types, but that will at least issue a warning. If there aren't warnings, code is guaranteed to be typesafe.

For problem #2, what you probably want is:

public interface MyNumber<T extends MyNumber<T>> implements ErrorMeasurable<T> {
     boolean approxEquals(T that) { ... }
}

public class MyDecimal2 implements MyNumber<MyDecimal2> {
     boolean approxEquals(MyDecimal2 that) { ... }
}

public class MyDecimal3 extends MyDecimal2 {
     boolean approxEquals(MyDecimal2 that) { ... }
}

public class UsesNumbersClass<T extends MyNumber<T>> {
     T boundNumber1, boundNumber2;

     void example() {
          boundNumber1.approxEquals(boundNumber2);
     }
}

public class UsesNumbersOnlyMethod {
     <T extends MyNumber<T>> void example(T boundNumber1, T boundNumber2) {
          boundNumber1.approxEquals(boundNumber2);
     }
}

Every class can have only single actual implementation of method boolean approxEquals(T that), so you have to decide for each class if you want that method to represent exactly that class (like MyDecimal2), or you want it to be able to handle broader types - some parent type (like MyDecimal3). Almost always you would want it to handle exactly that class.

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Thanks Sarmun, I did mean that Problem 1 & 3 make up a 'false' solution that I wanted to avoid and not necessarily solve for since there's no way to force non-raw generic type usage. The subclass of a concrete class example that you brought up isn't one I was trying to solve for. UsesNumbersOnlyMethod is similar to how I was hoping to use the type hierarchy under ErrorMeasurable. –  jaxzin Jan 31 '11 at 1:23
    
Can you explain more what would you like to do, that isn't covered by my answer? Main point is that if you have two ErrorMeasurable instances, you don't know that they can be checked for approxEquals, unless they are of exactly the same type. And that, you can only enforce by UsesNumbersClass or UsesNumbersOnlyMethod (type bound on class or on method) –  Sarmun Feb 1 '11 at 2:05
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