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I need to create as400 "logical files".

my app connects to the db with jdbc.

Is it possible to create "logical files" with sql statements ?

If yes I would appreciate a sample statement.

thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Are you trying to create a logical file with select/omits or are you trying to create a new index for faster queries? – Tracy Probst Jan 31 '11 at 13:48
    
@Tracy Probst Hi, My original purpose was to create a materialized query containing a select on multiple tables for performance.(i had issues with that: stackoverflow.com/questions/4843521/…). as an alternative I am trying to create a logical file which, to my understanding, is equivalent to materialized query, only it replaces the actual data with pointers to the original tables (i assume it indexes those tables to fit the query). my main concern is performance. – Aba Dov Jan 31 '11 at 14:34
2  
I think you may be a bit stuck on the nomenclature here. The "as400" now called IBM i operating system describes files in one of two basic ways. Either a physical or a logical file. An SQL Table is like a physical. Indexes and Views are like logicals. Ref: wiki.midrange.com/index.php/SQL – Lynette Duffy Feb 3 '11 at 16:33
    
@Lynette Duffy Thanks for the Link. it is useful – Aba Dov Feb 3 '11 at 17:28
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I suggest making use of the CREATE INDEX SQL command from the green-screen STRSQL command. Then you can prompt it. Here is an example of CREATE INDEX that let me query a 16 gigabyte file much faster. For this example, the physical file was the results of a database monitor than ran for a week:

CREATE INDEX QGPL.QZG0000016_QUERYJOB ON QGPL.QZG0000016
(QQJNUM ASC, QQUSER ASC, QQJOB ASC, QQUCNT ASC, QQRID ASC, QQI5 ASC)

The index itself took a long time to create, but subsequent queries based on the index were very fast.

If you need to join multiple tables, plan ahead. Know the fields you will use to join the tables and create indexes against the joined tables. You'll get the performance increase you're looking for. For an example, let's make up a query to show the items ordered by a customer:

SELECT ORDETAIL.ITEM_NAME, ORDETAIL.QUANTITY, ORHEADER.SHIPDATE
FROM ORHEADER
INNER JOIN ORDETAIL ON ORDETAIL.ORDERID = ORHEADER.ORDERID
WHERE ORHEADER.CUST_NUM = 123456

You would make the following indexes, if they didn't already exist:

CREATE INDEX DATALIB.ORHEADER_BY_CUSTOMER ON DATALIB.ORHEADER (CUST_NUM ASC, ORDERID)
CREATE INDEX DATALIB.ORDETAIL_BY_ORDER ON DATALIB.ORDETAIL (ORDERID)

If you need to create a logical file select/omit criteria, then you need to create a view. A view is not an index, though, and you can't mix an index and a view like you can with a keyed logical with select/omits. For that, a DDS spec is still the best.

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Thanks Tracy. Your answer is valuable. However I am looking for a solution that does not use "green screens" – Aba Dov Feb 2 '11 at 13:00
    
Aba, green screen is not necessary for the CREATE INDEX SQL command. It's just helpful because you can prompt. The commands outlined above will work just fine via ODBC. – Tracy Probst Feb 2 '11 at 17:55
    
+1 Good examples of how to create indexes (logical files) for performance – Lynette Duffy Feb 3 '11 at 16:40
2  
I would also add ORDERID to the end of your customer index; (CUST_NUM ASC, ORDERID). The optimizer will then use that index first, pick up the pointers to the id and slam over to the second index. Fast, fast. It's like connecting the dots :) – Lynette Duffy Feb 3 '11 at 20:04
    
@Lynette, I agree. I made the edit. – Tracy Probst Feb 7 '11 at 13:43

This will help if you are trying to an order by on your view, but will not really help if you have a performance issue.

Sample of data basetable:

A 
B 
C 
A 
A 
A 

Query:

create view myview1  as                   
select lib                                
from(                                     
  SELECT rank() over(order by lib), lib   
FROM basetable) a   

Sample of data from myview1

A 
A 
A 
A 
B 
C 
share|improve this answer

To achieve much of the same effect, I've created database views over all the tables in an AS/400 DB2, mapping more understandable names to the physical ones. I don't think views are logical files, but I'm just a user of said AS/400 and know exactly as much about it as needed to interact with the data.

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1  
The problem with views is that when you need to fetch data from them, their "build" query is executed. Logical files are similar to materialized view, are updated automatically but instead of saving the data they have "pointers" or indexes of the table rows they are based on. so fetching data from them is faster – Aba Dov Jan 30 '11 at 9:27
    
@Aba Dov : It's true that opening a view can take longer than opening a native LF (about .003 secs on my small model 515). But it's also true that the more sequential I/Os done over the two, the speed difference of the view will catch up and pass the LF. The crossover can be after reading maybe 75K rows or so. So the number of rows to process can be a factor, especially if tables get large. For the largest tables, the view can easily outperform a LF. – user2338816 Apr 3 '14 at 15:48

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