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Using Python is there any way to find out the processor information... (I need the name)

I need the name of the processor that the interpreter is running on. I checked the sys module but it has no such function.

I can use an external library also if required.

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4 Answers 4

The platform.processor() function returns the processor name as a string.

>>> import platform
>>> platform.processor()
'Intel64 Family 6 Model 23 Stepping 6, GenuineIntel'
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thanks, I did not know about the processor module –  user225312 Jan 30 '11 at 10:54
1  
can anyone say whether this is platform independent output. ie. does it always give the exact same output for the same CPU on windows/linux/osx? –  gnibbler Jan 30 '11 at 11:22
2  
It returns an empty string on my system (python 2.6.5 in Ubuntu)... –  Spacedman Jan 30 '11 at 11:30
    
@gnibbler: Is there any reason to doubt that the output may vary? Though I hope someone can confirm. –  user225312 Jan 30 '11 at 11:31
    
@Spacedman: "An empty string is returned if the value cannot be determined." Have the same issue. –  gorlum0 Jan 30 '11 at 12:02

There's some code here:

http://www.koders.com/python/fidB436B8043AA994C550C0961247DACC3E04E84734.aspx?s=mdef%3Apython

its very OS-dependent, so there's lots of if-branches. But it does work out all the CPU capabilities.

$ python cpuinfo.py 
CPU information: getNCPUs=2 has_mmx has_sse has_sse2 is_64bit is_Intel is_Pentium is_PentiumIV

For linux it looks in /proc/cpuinfo and tries using uname. For Windows it looks like it uses the registry.

To get the [first] processor name using this module:

>>> import cpuinfo
>>> cpuinfo.cpu.info[0]['model name']
'Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.60GHz'

If its got more than one processor, then the elements of cpuinfo.cpu.info will have their names. I don't think I've ever seen a PC with two different processors though (not since the 80's when you could get a Z80 co-processor for your 6502 CPU BBC Micro...)

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Sorry I needed the name, I should have mentioned –  user225312 Jan 30 '11 at 10:53
    
How to get the name added. –  Spacedman Jan 30 '11 at 11:28
2  
The link seems broken and searching cpuinfo on that website brings lots of results. could you please put the project name/a link to code –  Moh Zah Jul 28 '13 at 19:13

Here's a hackish bit of code that should consistently find the name of the processor on the three platforms that I have any reasonable experience.

import os, platform, subprocess, re

def get_processor_name():
    if platform.system() == "Windows":
        return platform.processor()
    elif platform.system() == "Darwin":
        import os
        os.environ['PATH'] = os.environ['PATH'] + os.pathsep + '/usr/sbin'
        command ="sysctl -n machdep.cpu.brand_string"
        return subprocess.check_output(command).strip()
    elif platform.system() == "Linux":
        command = "cat /proc/cpuinfo"
        all_info = subprocess.check_output(command, shell=True).strip()
        for line in all_info.split("\n"):
            if "model name" in line:
                return re.sub( ".*model name.*:", "", line,1)
    return ""
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Working code (let me know if this doesn't work for you):

import platform, subprocess

def get_processor_info():
    if platform.system() == "Windows":
        return platform.processor()
    elif platform.system() == "Darwin":
        return subprocess.check_output(['/usr/sbin/sysctl', "-n", "machdep.cpu.brand_string"]).strip()
    elif platform.system() == "Linux":
        command = "cat /proc/cpuinfo"
        return subprocess.check_output(command, shell=True).strip()
    return ""
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