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I want to run a function when the page is loaded, but I dont want to use it in the body tag.

I have a script that runs if I initialise it in the body -like this:

function codeAddress() {
 code.....
}

<body onLoad="codeAddress()">

But I want to run it without the body onLoad="codeAddress()" and I have tryed a lot of things, eg this:

window.onload = codeAddress;

but it is not working?

So how do I run it when the page is loaded? Thanks!

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Please post your full code. As Darin and I have said (ignore the others) this should work. There must be an error elsewhere if it's not working. –  Skilldrick Jan 30 '11 at 11:38
    
all popular browsers can display javascript errors - do you get any? –  Christoph Jan 30 '11 at 11:56
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5 Answers 5

up vote 70 down vote accepted

window.onload = codeAddress; should work - here's a demo, and the full code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Test</title>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
        <script type="text/javascript">
        function codeAddress() {
            alert('ok');
        }
        window.onload = codeAddress;
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>

    </body>
</html>

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Test</title>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
        <script type="text/javascript">
        function codeAddress() {
            alert('ok');
        }

        </script>
    </head>
    <body onload="codeAddress();">

    </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
As I said in my answer, there's nothing wrong with the code as seen - the reason it's not working must be an error in the JS somewhere. –  Skilldrick Jan 30 '11 at 11:27
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Taking Darin's answer but jQuery style. (I know the user asked for javascript).

running fiddle

$(document).ready ( function(){
   alert('ok');
});​
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window.onload = function(){codeAddress();};
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3  
This is the equivalent of window.onload = codeAddress to all intents and purposes. If that doesn't work there's no reason this would. –  Skilldrick Jan 30 '11 at 11:22
    
Ok. What's your point? –  Jared Farrish Jan 30 '11 at 11:27
2  
My point is that it's a waste of time. Why add 15 characters that don't do anything? –  Skilldrick Jan 30 '11 at 11:33
1  
It has other uses. This particular person had another question earlier where he had an initialize function plus codeAddress that he was trying to combine. This demonstrates that he is in fact calling an anonymous function, not just the function itself. To be honest, I just use jQuery's $(document).ready(). –  Jared Farrish Jan 30 '11 at 11:40
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Take a look at the domReady script that allows setting up of multiple functions to execute when the DOM has loaded. It's basically what the Dom ready does in many popular JavaScript libraries, but is lightweight and can be taken and added at the start of your external script file.

Example usage

// add reference to domReady script or place 
// contents of script before here

function codeAddress() {

}

domReady(codeAddress);
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Are you running window.onload = codeAddress after codeAddress() is defined? If so, this should work. Are you sure there isn't an error elsewhere?

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This doesn't make any sense. window.onload runs after page load and all javascript is available, so the codeAddress() function can be declared anywhere within the page or linked js files. It doesn't have to come before unless it were called during the page load itself. –  Jared Farrish Jan 30 '11 at 11:31
    
@Jared Yes it does. Have a look at jsfiddle.net/HZHmc. It doesn't work. But if you move the window.onload to after the definition: jsfiddle.net/HZHmc/1 it does work. –  Skilldrick Jan 30 '11 at 11:35
    
A function declaration is generally hoisted to the top of the scope, so the function can be declared anywhere in an accessible scope. –  Russ Cam Jan 30 '11 at 11:36
    
Actually, hmm. If the function is declared in the head tag, then window.onload works just fine. However, if the function is declared later (for instance, in the body tag), then it won't. My apologies, although I was partially correct. If the codeAddress function is not declared in the head, then that could be the problem. –  Jared Farrish Jan 30 '11 at 11:37
    
@skilldrick - in your first exame, it doesn't work because that's a function expression that doesn't get hoisted. Change it to a function declaration (function func() {}) and it works. –  Russ Cam Jan 30 '11 at 11:38
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