Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why am I getting this database error when I update a table?

ERROR at line 1: ORA-00054: resource busy and acquire with NOWAIT specified or timeout expired

share|improve this question
7  
It generally helps if you post the statement that leads to the error –  Gary Myers Jan 30 '11 at 21:48

12 Answers 12

up vote 49 down vote accepted

Your table is already locked by some query. Like you have executed "select for update" and has yet not committed/rollback and again fired select query. Do a commit/rollback before executing your query.

share|improve this answer
18  
I'd add 'in another session' to that. One common scenario is that you've tested the update in a tool, say SQL Developer or Toad, and have then tried to run it somewhere else while the first session still holds the lock. So you need to commit/rollback the other session before you can run the update again. –  Alex Poole Jan 30 '11 at 16:36
    
Most likely DML (insert/delete/update) rather than a query. And in another session. Just because the guy who asked seems to be a newbie the answer may be correct. But you CANNOT commit in behalf of other users in a production system. If add to your answer I'll remove the downvote. –  Arturo Hernandez Jul 15 '13 at 19:17
1  
Well, what made me having that problem was in Toad: A colleague was in the same table as i were when i wanted to delete a row, and so i couldnt delete it. When he switched to another table i was able to delete rows. It maybe help someone out there. But this is only if you work with Toad inside the tables, and not for querys. –  DatRid Oct 4 '13 at 9:23

from here ORA-00054: resource busy and acquire with NOWAIT specified

You can also look up the sql,username,machine,port information and get to the actual process which holds the connection

SELECT O.OBJECT_NAME, S.SID, S.SERIAL#, P.SPID, S.PROGRAM,S.USERNAME,
S.MACHINE,S.PORT , S.LOGON_TIME,SQ.SQL_FULLTEXT 
FROM V$LOCKED_OBJECT L, DBA_OBJECTS O, V$SESSION S, 
V$PROCESS P, V$SQL SQ 
WHERE L.OBJECT_ID = O.OBJECT_ID 
AND L.SESSION_ID = S.SID AND S.PADDR = P.ADDR 
AND S.SQL_ADDRESS = SQ.ADDRESS;
share|improve this answer
2  
I had to remove s.port from the query but It let me find the culprit –  Sibster Jan 28 '13 at 10:10
    
locks are transient. so if the insert comes, then you commit immediately. it won't show up in this query. you can still get the error if you issue the 'DDL'. while the transaction is open. see my post below .This is really easy to work around. –  Bob Apr 29 '13 at 21:18
    
I'm having the same problem as the OP, but I can't see any of the tables you mention (select * from V$LOCKED_OBJECT, for example, returns ORA-00942: table or view does not exist). Any ideas? –  random_forest_fanatic Jul 18 '13 at 13:09
    
You might not have sufficient privileges to look at the management views. –  njplumridge Sep 25 '13 at 13:53
    
Follow-up to the S.Port problem: the 11.2 docs mention Port as a field in V$Session, but for me, using 11.1, S.Port is invalid. Was it added for 11.2, maybe? –  Jon of All Trades Oct 9 at 19:17

There is a very easy work around for this problem.

If you run a 10046 trace on your session (google this... too much to explain). You will see that before any DDL operation Oracle does the following:

LOCK TABLE 'TABLE_NAME' NO WAIT

So if another session has an open transaction you get an error. So the fix is... drum roll please. Issue your own lock before the DDL and leave out the 'NO WAIT'.

Special Note:

if you are doing splitting/dropping partitions oracle just locks the partition. -- so yo can just lock the partition subpartition.

So... The following steps fix the problem.

  1. LOCK TABLE 'TABLE NAME'; -- you will 'wait' (developers call this hanging). until the session with the open transaction, commits. This is a queue. so there may be several sessions ahead of you. but you will NOT error out.
  2. Execute DDL. Your DDL will then run a lock with the NO WAIT. However, your session has aquired the lock. So you are good.
  3. DDL auto-commits. This frees the locks.

DML statements will 'wait' or as developers call it 'hang' while the table is locked.

I use this in code that runs from a job to drop partitions. It works fine. It is in a database that is constantly inserting at a rate of several hundred inserts/second. No errors.

if you are wondering. Doing this in 11g. I have done this in 10g before as well in the past.

share|improve this answer
1  
ok, this is wrong. in 11g, use the set_ddl_timeout, This is only available in 11g. oracle does a commit before doing DDL, so it releases the lock. In 11g, you can have your DDL wait. I am doing that now. Works fine. –  Bob May 22 '13 at 15:54

This error happens when the resource is busy. Check if you have any referential constraints in the query. Or even the tables that you have mentioned in the query may be busy. They might be engaged with some other job which will be definitely listed in the following query:

SELECT * FROM V$SESSION WHERE STATUS = 'ACTIVE'

Find the SID,

SELECT * FROM V$OPEN_CURSOR WHERE SID = --the id
share|improve this answer

Your problem looks like you are mixing DML & DDL operations. See this URL which explains this issue:

http://www.orafaq.com/forum/t/54714/2/

share|improve this answer

Please Kill Oracle Session

Use below query to check active session info

SELECT O.OBJECT_NAME, S.SID, S.SERIAL#, P.SPID, S.PROGRAM,SQ.SQL_FULLTEXT, S.LOGON_TIME FROM V$LOCKED_OBJECT L, DBA_OBJECTS O, V$SESSION S, V$PROCESS P, V$SQL SQ WHERE L.OBJECT_ID = O.OBJECT_ID AND L.SESSION_ID = S.SID AND S.PADDR = P.ADDR AND S.SQL_ADDRESS = SQ.ADDRESS;

kill like

alter system kill session 'SID,SERIAL#';**(e.g- alter system kill session '13,36543';)

Reference http://abeytom.blogspot.com/2012/08/finding-and-fixing-ora-00054-resource.html

share|improve this answer

This happens when a session other than the one used to alter a table is holding a lock likely because of a DML (update/delete/insert). If you are developing a new system, it is likely that you or someone in your team issues the update statement and you could kill the session without much consequence. Or you could commit from that session once you know who has the session open.

If you have access to a SQL admin system use it to find the offending session. And perhaps kill it.

You could use v$session and v$lock and others but I suggest you google how to find that session and then how to kill it.

In a production system, it really depends. For oracle 10g and older, you could execute

LOCK TABLE mytable in exclusive mode;
alter table mytable modify mycolumn varchar2(5);

In a separate session but have the following ready in case it takes too long.

alter system kill session '....

It depends on what system do you have, older systems are more likely to not commit every single time. That is a problem since there may be long standing locks. So your lock would prevent any new locks and wait for a lock that who knows when will be released. That is why you have the other statement ready. Or you could look for PLSQL scripts out there that do similar things automatically.

In version 11g there is a new environment variable that sets a wait time. I think it likely does something similar to what I described. Mind you that locking issues don't go away.

ALTER SYSTEM SET ddl_lock_timeout=20;
alter table mytable modify mycolumn varchar2(5);

Finally it may be best to wait until there are few users in the system to do this kind of maintenance.

share|improve this answer

In my case, I was quite sure it was one of my own sessions which was blocking. Therefore, it was safe to do the following:

  • I found the offending session with:

    SELECT * FROM V$SESSION WHERE OSUSER='my_local_username';

    The session was inactive, but it still held the lock somehow. Note, that you may need to use some other WHERE condition in your case (e.g. try USERNAME or MACHINE fields).

  • Killed the session using the ID and SERIAL# acquired above:

    alter system kill session '<id>, <serial#>';

share|improve this answer

You need to schedule the “alter table” for when there is low activity, and notify the end-users about the scheduled maintenance. Check out this page for more details.

share|improve this answer

Just check for process holding the session and Kill it. Its back to normal.

Below SQL will find your process

SELECT s.inst_id,
   s.sid,
   s.serial#,
   p.spid,
   s.username,
   s.program FROM   gv$session s
   JOIN gv$process p ON p.addr = s.paddr AND p.inst_id = s.inst_id;

Then kill it

ALTER SYSTEM KILL SESSION 'sid,serial#'

OR

some example I found online seems to need the instance id as well alter system kill session '130,620,@1';

share|improve this answer

this little sql will kill session(s) for you -- without you typing in anything manually.


BEGIN
FOR C IN (SELECT S.SID SID, S.SERIAL# SERIAL FROM V$LOCKED_OBJECT L, V$SESSION S WHERE L.SESSION_ID = S.SID) LOOP
   EXECUTE IMMEDIATE ('ALTER SYSTEM KILL SESSION ''' || C.SID || ',' || C.SERIAL || '''');
END LOOP;
END;
share|improve this answer

Solution given by Shashi's link is the best... no needs to contact dba or someone else

make a backup

create table xxxx_backup as select * from xxxx;

delete all rows

delete from xxxx;
commit;

insert your backup.

insert into xxxx (select * from xxxx_backup);
commit;
share|improve this answer
6  
delete/truncate are not interchangeable. performing large numbers of deletes have massive performance implications. This is really bad. –  Bob Apr 29 '13 at 21:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.