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In the following, I'm trying to split string without creating copies using strok

#include <string.h>

void func(char *c)
{
    char *pch = strtok (c,"#");

    while (pch != NULL)
    {
        pch = strtok (NULL, "#");
    }
}

int main()
{
    char c[] = "a#a\nb#b\n";

    char *pch = strtok (c,"\n");

    while (pch != NULL)
    {
        char *p = new char[strlen(pch)+1];
        strcpy(p, pch);

        func(p); //copy of pch

        pch = strtok (NULL, "\n"); //fails to get pointer to 'b#b'
    }
}
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Uhm... strtok() may store the tokenized string in a static buffer. Hence, when second strtok() is called in the func(), the results of the first operation (in the main()) seem to be lost. Take a look at strtok_r().

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On a side (and possibly irrelevant) note, I don't really understand why you mix C and C++ code. You could have made your life a tad easier if you used STL strings and boost libraries. –  Roman D Jan 30 '11 at 12:24
    
would you like to provide a link to strtok_r() implementation? –  cpx Jan 30 '11 at 12:26
    
@Dave18: it actually is a part of POSIX.1-2001, so if you're writing code for *NIX, it is already there, you may take a look at its man page. If you're programming for Windows, they've got strtok_s() there: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ftsafwz3.aspx –  Roman D Jan 30 '11 at 12:30
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strtok use static variables, therefore it cannot work reentrant and is never threadsafe. strtok_r is not C89/C99 only POSIX.

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