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I have a list:

my_list = ['abc-123', 'def-456', 'ghi-789', 'abc-456']

and want to search for items that contain the string 'abc'. How can I do that?

if 'abc' in my_list:

would check if 'abc' exists in the list but it just exists 'abc-123' and 'abc-456' and not 'abc'. So how can I get all items that contain 'abc' ?

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1  
To check the opposite (if one string contains one among multiple strings): stackoverflow.com/a/6531704/2436175 –  Antonio Nov 18 at 10:48

8 Answers 8

up vote 207 down vote accepted

If you only want to check for the presence of an "abc" in any string in the list, you could try

some_list = ['abc-123', 'def-456', 'ghi-789', 'abc-456']
if any("abc" in s for s in some_list):
    # whatever

If you really want to get all the items containing "abc", use

matching = [s for s in some_list if "abc" in s]
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I have to check if one item is in an array of 6 elements. Is it quicker to do 6 "if" or is it the same? –  Olivier Pons Mar 10 '13 at 0:11
9  
@OlivierPons, just do if myitem in myarray: –  alldayremix Mar 21 '13 at 15:26
3  
Another way to get all strings containing substring 'abc': filter(lambda element: 'abc' in element, some_list) –  hangtwenty May 31 '13 at 20:10
    
But from readability perspective, I would rather put any("abc" in s for s in some_list) in another function and say contains("abc",list) –  Tarik Nov 6 '13 at 0:25
1  
@p014k: use the index() method: try: return mylist.index(myitem); except ValueError: pass –  Sven Marnach Oct 16 at 12:02

Use filter to get at the elements that have abc.

>>> lst = ['abc-123', 'def-456', 'ghi-789', 'abc-456']
>>> print filter(lambda x: 'abc' in x, lst)
['abc-123', 'abc-456']

You can also use a list comprehension.

>>> [x for x in lst if 'abc' in x]

By the way, don't use the word list as a variable name since it is already used for the list type.

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This is quite an old question, but I offer this answer because the previous answers do not cope with items in the list that are not strings (or some kind of iterable object). Such items would cause the entire list comprehension to fail with an exception.

To gracefully deal with such items in the list by skipping the non-iterable items, use the following:

[el for el in lst if isinstance(el, collections.Iterable) and (st in el)]

then, with such a list:

lst = [None, 'abc-123', 'def-456', 'ghi-789', 'abc-456', 123]
st = 'abc'

you will still get the matching items (['abc-123', 'abc-456'])

The test for iterable may not be the best. Got it from here: In python, how do I determine if a variable is Iterable?

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x = 'aaa'
L = ['aaa-12', 'bbbaaa', 'cccaa']
res = [y for y in L if x in y]
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any('abc' in item for item in mylist)
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for item in my_list:
    if item.find("abc") != -1:
        print item
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Just throwing this out there: if you happen to need to match against more than one string, for example abc and def, you can put combine two list comprehensions as follows:

matchers = ['abc','def']
matching = [s for s in my_list if any(xs in s for xs in matchers)]

Output:

['abc-123', 'def-456', 'abc-456']
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The winning example does not work and is always True;

some_list = ['abc-123', 'def-456', 'ghi-789', 'abc-456']
if any("xyz" in s for s in some_list): print('XYZ')
if any("abc" in s for s in some_list): print('ABC')
XYZ
ABC

Seems the [] square brackets were missing;

some_list = ['abc-123', 'def-456', 'ghi-789', 'abc-456']
if any(["xyz" in s for s in some_list]): print('XYZ')
if any(["abc" in s for s in some_list]): print('ABC')  
ABC
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