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I am given a bunch of expressions in prefix notation in an ANSI text file. I would like to produce another ANSI text file containing the step-by-step evaluation of these expressions. For example:

- + ^ x 2 ^ y 2 1

should be turned into

t1 = x^2
t2 = y^2
t3 = t1 + t2
t4 = t3 - 1
t4 is the result

I also have to identify common subexpressions. For example given

expression_1: z = ^ x 2
expression_2: - + z ^ y 2 1
expression_3: - z y

I have to generate an output saying that x appears in expressions 1, 2 and 3 (through z).

I have to identify dependecies: expression_1 depends only on x, expression_2 depends on x and y, etc.

The original problem is more difficult than the examples above and I have no control over the input format, it is in prefix notation in a much more complicated way than the above ones.

I already have a working implementation in C++ however it is a lot of pain doing such things in C++.

What programming language is best suited for these type problems?

Could you recommend a tutorial / website / book where I could start?

What keywords should I look for?

UPDATE: Based on the answers, the above examples are somewhat unfortunate, I have unary, binary and n-ary operators in the input. (If you are wondering, exp is an unary operator, sum over a range is an n-ary operator.)

share|improve this question
    
How do you know when you are done with your sum? S + S 3 3 3 3 3 could be interpreted many ways, if S was the sum operator. If you don't specify your grammar, it's hard to know how to parse it. –  Rex Kerr Jan 30 '11 at 23:27
    
The number of arguments is also given as the first argument of the n-ary operator, for example: sum 3 x y z. –  Ali Jan 30 '11 at 23:43
    
What does exp do? –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 31 '11 at 0:15
    
The exponential function. –  Ali Jan 31 '11 at 11:08

7 Answers 7

To give you an idea how this would look like in Python, here is some example code:

operators = "+-*/^"

def parse(it, count=1):
    token = next(it)
    if token in operators:
        op1, count = parse(it, count)
        op2, count = parse(it, count)
        tmp = "t%s" % count
        print tmp, "=", op1, token, op2
        return tmp, count + 1
    return token, count

s = "- + ^ x 2 ^ y 2 1"
a = s.split()
res, dummy = parse(iter(a))
print res, "is the result"

The output is the same as your example output.

This example aside, I think any of the high-level languages you listed are almost equally suited for the task.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the example code, really convincing. –  Ali Jan 30 '11 at 14:18
    
Hmm. The above code assumes binary operators. In that case the C++ implementation is similarly simple. Unfortunately I get unary, binary, and n-ary operators in the input :( –  Ali Jan 30 '11 at 22:29
    
@Ali: The example was meant to give you an impression of the language for the problem at hand. It was not meant as a complete reimplementation of your code. And Python (or any of the high-level languages you listed) won't take away the complexity of the problem. Thes languages might be more convenient than C++ anyway. –  Sven Marnach Jan 30 '11 at 22:59
    
@Sven Sorry, it was not what I meant and I did not mean to criticize your example code. I just realized that for this particular case the C++ solution is similarly simple, that's it. However, it seems to me that sympy would worth a shot. –  Ali Jan 30 '11 at 23:11
    
@Ali: Some parser library might help as well. And I didn't feel criticised by your above comment, don't worry :) –  Sven Marnach Jan 30 '11 at 23:36

The sympy python package does symbolic algebra, including common subexpression elimination and generating evaluation steps for a set of expressions.

See: http://docs.sympy.org/dev/modules/rewriting.html (Look at the cse method at the bottom of the page).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, seems really awesome! +1 for the link. –  Ali Jan 30 '11 at 14:15

The Python example is elegantly short, but I suspect that you won't actually get enough control over your expressions that way. You're much better off actually building an expression tree, even though it takes more work, and then querying the tree. Here's an example in Scala (suitable for cutting and pasting into the REPL):

object OpParser {
  private def estr(oe: Option[Expr]) = oe.map(_.toString).getOrElse("_")
  case class Expr(text: String, left: Option[Expr] = None, right: Option[Expr] = None) {
    import Expr._
    def varsUsed: Set[String] = text match {
      case Variable(v) => Set(v)
      case Op(o) =>
        left.map(_.varsUsed).getOrElse(Set()) ++ right.map(_.varsUsed).getOrElse(Set())
      case _ => Set()
    }
    def printTemp(n: Int = 0, depth: Int = 0): (String,Int) = text match {
      case Op(o) => 
        val (tl,nl) = left.map(_.printTemp(n,depth+1)).getOrElse(("_",n))
        val (tr,nr) = right.map(_.printTemp(nl,depth+1)).getOrElse(("_",n))
        val t = "t"+(nr+1)
        println(t + " = " + tl + " " + text + " " + tr)
        if (depth==0) println(t + " is the result")
        (t, nr+1)
      case _ => (text, n)
    }
    override def toString: String = {
      if (left.isDefined || right.isDefined) {
        "(" + estr(left) + " " + text + " " + estr(right) + ")"
      }
      else text
    }
  }
  object Expr {
    val Digit = "([0-9]+)"r
    val Variable = "([a-z])"r
    val Op = """([+\-*/^])"""r
    def parse(s: String) = {
      val bits = s.split(" ")
      val parsed = (
        if (bits.length > 2 && Variable.unapplySeq(bits(0)).isDefined && bits(1)=="=") {
          parseParts(bits,2)
        }
        else parseParts(bits)
      )
      parsed.flatMap(p => if (p._2<bits.length) None else Some(p._1))
    }
    def parseParts(as: Array[String], from: Int = 0): Option[(Expr,Int)] = {
      if (from >= as.length) None
      else as(from) match {
        case Digit(n) => Some(Expr(n), from+1)
        case Variable(v) => Some(Expr(v), from+1)
        case Op(o) =>
          parseParts(as, from+1).flatMap(lhs =>
            parseParts(as, lhs._2).map(rhs => (Expr(o,Some(lhs._1),Some(rhs._1)), rhs._2))
          )
        case _ => None
      }
    }
  }
}

This may be a little much to digest all at once, but then again, this does rather a lot.

Firstly, it's completely bulletproof (note the heavy use of Option where a result might fail). If you throw garbage at it, it will just return None. (With a bit more work, you could make it complain about the problem in an informative way--basically the case Op(o) which then does parseParts nested twice could instead store the results and print out an informative error message if the op didn't get two arguments. Likewise, parse could complain about trailing values instead of just throwing back None.)

Secondly, when you're done with it, you have a complete expression tree. Note that printTemp prints out the temporary variables you wanted, and varsUsed lists the variables used in a particular expression, which you can use to expand to a full list once you parse multiple lines. (You might need to fiddle with the regexp a little if your variables can be more than just a to z.) Note also that the expression tree prints itself out in normal infix notation. Let's look at some examples:

scala> OpParser.Expr.parse("4")
res0: Option[OpParser.Expr] = Some(4)

scala> OpParser.Expr.parse("+ + + + + 1 2 3 4 5 6")
res1: Option[OpParser.Expr] = Some((((((1 + 2) + 3) + 4) + 5) + 6))

scala> OpParser.Expr.parse("- + ^ x 2 ^ y 2 1")
res2: Option[OpParser.Expr] = Some((((x ^ 2) + (y ^ 2)) - 1))

scala> OpParser.Expr.parse("+ + 4 4 4 4") // Too many 4s!
res3: Option[OpParser.Expr] = None

scala> OpParser.Expr.parse("Q#$S!M$#!*)000") // Garbage!
res4: Option[OpParser.Expr] = None

scala> OpParser.Expr.parse("z =") // Assigned nothing?! 
res5: Option[OpParser.Expr] = None

scala> res2.foreach(_.printTemp())
t1 = x ^ 2
t2 = y ^ 2
t3 = t1 + t2
t4 = t3 - 1
t4 is the result

scala> res2.map(_.varsUsed)       
res10: Option[Set[String]] = Some(Set(x, y))

Now, you could do this in Python also without too much additional work, and in a number of the other languages besides. I prefer to use Scala, but you may prefer otherwise. Regardless, I do recommend creating the full expression tree if you want to retain maximum flexibility for handling tricky cases.

share|improve this answer
    
There has to be a way to make that prettier. For one thing, you could simply have gone directly to using Scala's parse combinators. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 30 '11 at 22:11
    
+1 for all the trouble you went through to anwer my question. As for "I do recommend creating the full expression tree if you want to retain maximum flexibility for handling tricky case", I have a working implementation in C++. I am just curious how difficult it would be in other languages. –  Ali Jan 30 '11 at 22:21
    
@Daniel - The parser combinators do make the parsing prettier. But then all the ugliness goes into traversing the structure, and overall it seemed no better. –  Rex Kerr Jan 30 '11 at 23:17
    
@Ali - Since this code does almost everything, you might get the wrong impression about how hard it is in Scala. If you just wanted to do what the Python code did except in Scala, it would be similar in length (slightly longer and not quite as clean-looking, since Scala needs a few type annotations). –  Rex Kerr Jan 30 '11 at 23:20
    
Do not worry, I need much more than what the Python code does :( And I did realize that implementing what the Python code does in C++ is similarly simple. However sympy seems to offer other functionalities I might want to use. (Of course, the sympy developers must have suffered a lot to implement them.) –  Ali Jan 30 '11 at 23:50

Prefix notation is really simple to do with plain recursive parsers. For instance:

object Parser {
    val Subexprs = collection.mutable.Map[String, String]()
    val Dependencies = collection.mutable.Map[String, Set[String]]().withDefaultValue(Set.empty)
    val TwoArgsOp = "([-+*/^])".r     // - at the beginning, ^ at the end
    val Ident = "(\\p{Alpha}\\w*)".r
    val Literal = "(\\d+)".r

    var counter = 1
    def getIdent = {
        val ident = "t" + counter
        counter += 1
        ident
    }

    def makeOp(op: String) = {
        val op1 = expr
        val op2 = expr
        val ident = getIdent 
        val subexpr = op1 + " " + op + " " + op2
        Subexprs(ident)  = subexpr
        Dependencies(ident) = Dependencies(op1) ++ Dependencies(op2) + op1 + op2
        ident
    }

    def expr: String = nextToken match {
        case TwoArgsOp(op) => makeOp(op)
        case Ident(id)     => id
        case Literal(lit)  => lit
        case x             => error("Unknown token "+x)
    }

    def nextToken = tokens.next
    var tokens: Iterator[String] = _

    def parse(input: String) = {
        tokens = input.trim split "\\s+" toIterator;
        counter = 1
        expr
        if (tokens.hasNext)
            error("Input not fully parsed: "+tokens.mkString(" "))

        (Subexprs, Dependencies)
    }
}

This will generate output like this:

scala> val (subexpressions, dependencies) = Parser.parse("- + ^ x 2 ^ y 2 1")
subexpressions: scala.collection.mutable.Map[String,String] = Map(t3 -> t1 + t2, t4 -> t3 - 1, t1 -> x ^ 2, t2 -> y ^ 2)
dependencies: scala.collection.mutable.Map[String,Set[String]] = Map(t3 -> Set(x, y, t2, 2, t1), t4 -> Set(x, y, t3, t2, 1, 2, t1), t1 -> Set(x, 2), t
2 -> Set(y, 2))

scala> subexpressions.toSeq.sorted foreach println
(t1,x ^ 2)
(t2,y ^ 2)
(t3,t1 + t2)
(t4,t3 - 1)

scala> dependencies.toSeq.sortBy(_._1) foreach println
(t1,Set(x, 2))
(t2,Set(y, 2))
(t3,Set(x, y, t2, 2, t1))
(t4,Set(x, y, t3, t2, 1, 2, t1))

This can be easily expanded. For instance, to handle multiple expression statements you can use this:

object Parser {
    val Subexprs = collection.mutable.Map[String, String]()
    val Dependencies = collection.mutable.Map[String, Set[String]]().withDefaultValue(Set.empty)
    val TwoArgsOp = "([-+*/^])".r     // - at the beginning, ^ at the end
    val Ident = "(\\p{Alpha}\\w*)".r
    val Literal = "(\\d+)".r

    var counter = 1
    def getIdent = {
        val ident = "t" + counter
        counter += 1
        ident
    }

    def makeOp(op: String) = {
        val op1 = expr
        val op2 = expr
        val ident = getIdent 
        val subexpr = op1 + " " + op + " " + op2
        Subexprs(ident)  = subexpr
        Dependencies(ident) = Dependencies(op1) ++ Dependencies(op2) + op1 + op2
        ident
    }

    def expr: String = nextToken match {
        case TwoArgsOp(op) => makeOp(op)
        case Ident(id)     => id
        case Literal(lit)  => lit
        case x             => error("Unknown token "+x)
    }

    def assignment: Unit = {
        val ident = nextToken
        nextToken match {
            case "=" => 
                val tmpIdent = expr
                Dependencies(ident) = Dependencies(tmpIdent)
                Subexprs(ident) = Subexprs(tmpIdent)
                Dependencies.remove(tmpIdent)
                Subexprs.remove(tmpIdent)
            case x   => error("Expected assignment, got "+x)
        }
     }

    def stmts: Unit = while(tokens.hasNext) tokens.head match {
        case TwoArgsOp(_) => expr
        case Ident(_)     => assignment
        case x            => error("Unknown statement starting with "+x)
    }

    def nextToken = tokens.next
    var tokens: BufferedIterator[String] = _

    def parse(input: String) = {
        tokens = (input.trim split "\\s+" toIterator).buffered
        counter = 1
        stmts
        if (tokens.hasNext)
            error("Input not fully parsed: "+tokens.mkString(" "))

        (Subexprs, Dependencies)
    }
}

Yielding:

scala> val (subexpressions, dependencies) = Parser.parse("""
     | z = ^ x 2
     | - + z ^ y 2 1
     | - z y
     | """)
subexpressions: scala.collection.mutable.Map[String,String] = Map(t3 -> z + t2, t5 -> z - y, t4 -> t3 - 1, z -> x ^ 2, t2 -> y ^ 2)
dependencies: scala.collection.mutable.Map[String,Set[String]] = Map(t3 -> Set(x, y, t2, 2, z), t5 -> Set(x, 2, z, y), t4 -> Set(x, y, t3, t2, 1, 2, z
), z -> Set(x, 2), t2 -> Set(y, 2))

scala> subexpressions.toSeq.sorted foreach println
(t2,y ^ 2)
(t3,z + t2)
(t4,t3 - 1)
(t5,z - y)
(z,x ^ 2)

scala> dependencies.toSeq.sortBy(_._1) foreach println
(t2,Set(y, 2))
(t3,Set(x, y, t2, 2, z))
(t4,Set(x, y, t3, t2, 1, 2, z))
(t5,Set(x, 2, z, y))
(z,Set(x, 2))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for your considerable efforts. –  Ali Jan 30 '11 at 22:15
    
@Ali And note that the parser got harder to write once a non-infix element, the assignment, was introduced. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 30 '11 at 22:18
    
@Daniel As I see, your solution only works for binary operators. I have unary, binary and n-ary operators :( I am beginning to think that my C++ implementation is not that complicated after all. –  Ali Jan 30 '11 at 22:26
    
@Ali It works for operators of any arity. If you give an example of unary and n-ary operators, I'll edit the code to see how it can be expanded. Another possibility is going the way of a full parser -- then you just have to research what's the parsing libraries of whatever language you choose. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 30 '11 at 22:33
    
@Daniel Thanks, but you really do not have to. So far, the Scala implementation does not seem significantly simpler than what I already have in C++ and that answers my question regarding Scala. Many thanks for your efforts! –  Ali Jan 30 '11 at 22:38

Ok, since recursive parsers are not your thing, here's an alternative with parse combinators:

object PrefixParser extends JavaTokenParsers {
    import scala.collection.mutable

    // Maps generated through parsing

    val Subexprs = mutable.Map[String, String]()
    val Dependencies = mutable.Map[String, Set[String]]().withDefaultValue(Set.empty)

    // Initialize, read, parse & evaluate string

    def read(input: String) = {
        counter = 1
        Subexprs.clear
        Dependencies.clear
        parseAll(stmts, input)
    }

    // Grammar

    def stmts               = stmt+
    def stmt                = assignment | expr
    def assignment          = (ident <~ "=") ~ expr ^^ assignOp
    def expr: P             = subexpr | identifier | number
    def subexpr: P          = twoArgs | nArgs
    def twoArgs: P          = operator ~ expr ~ expr ^^ twoArgsOp
    def nArgs: P            = "sum" ~ ("\\d+".r >> args) ^^ nArgsOp
    def args(n: String): Ps = repN(n.toInt, expr)
    def operator            = "[-+*/^]".r
    def identifier          = ident ^^ (id => Result(id, Set(id)))
    def number              = wholeNumber ^^ (Result(_, Set.empty))

    // Evaluation helper class and types

    case class Result(ident: String, dependencies: Set[String])
    type P = Parser[Result]
    type Ps = Parser[List[Result]]

    // Evaluation methods

    def assignOp: (String ~ Result) => Result = {
        case ident ~ result => 
            val value = assign(ident, 
                               Subexprs(result.ident),
                               result.dependencies - result.ident)
            Subexprs.remove(result.ident)
            Dependencies.remove(result.ident)
            value
    }

    def assign(ident: String, 
               value: String, 
               dependencies: Set[String]): Result = {
        Subexprs(ident) = value
        Dependencies(ident) = dependencies
        Result(ident, dependencies)
    }

    def twoArgsOp: (String ~ Result ~ Result) => Result = { 
        case op ~ op1 ~ op2 => makeOp(op, op1, op2) 
    }

    def makeOp(op: String, 
               op1: Result, 
               op2: Result): Result = {
        val ident = getIdent
        assign(ident, 
               "%s %s %s" format (op1.ident, op, op2.ident),
               op1.dependencies ++ op2.dependencies + ident)
    } 

    def nArgsOp: (String ~ List[Result]) => Result = { 
        case op ~ ops => makeNOp(op, ops) 
    }

    def makeNOp(op: String, ops: List[Result]): Result = {
        val ident = getIdent
        assign(ident, 
               "%s(%s)" format (op, ops map (_.ident) mkString ", "),
               ops.foldLeft(Set(ident))(_ ++ _.dependencies))
    } 

    var counter = 1
    def getIdent = {
        val ident = "t" + counter
        counter += 1
        ident
    }

    // Debugging helper methods

    def printAssignments = Subexprs.toSeq.sorted foreach println
    def printDependencies = Dependencies.toSeq.sortBy(_._1) map {
        case (id, dependencies) => (id, dependencies - id)
    } foreach println

}

This is the kind of results you get:

scala> PrefixParser.read("""
     | z = ^ x 2
     | - + z ^ y 2 1
     | - z y
     | """)
res77: PrefixParser.ParseResult[List[PrefixParser.Result]] = [5.1] parsed: List(Result(z,Set(x)), Result(t4,Set(t4, y, t3, t2, z)), Result(t5,Set(z, y
, t5)))

scala> PrefixParser.printAssignments
(t2,y ^ 2)
(t3,z + t2)
(t4,t3 - 1)
(t5,z - y)
(z,x ^ 2)

scala> PrefixParser.printDependencies
(t2,Set(y))
(t3,Set(z, y, t2))
(t4,Set(y, t3, t2, z))
(t5,Set(z, y))
(z,Set(x))

n-Ary operator

scala> PrefixParser.read("""
     | x = sum 3 + 1 2 * 3 4 5
     | * x x
     | """)
res93: PrefixParser.ParseResult[List[PrefixParser.Result]] = [4.1] parsed: List(Result(x,Set(t1, t2)), Result(t4,Set(x, t4)))

scala> PrefixParser.printAssignments
(t1,1 + 2)
(t2,3 * 4)
(t4,x * x)
(x,sum(t1, t2, 5))

scala> PrefixParser.printDependencies
(t1,Set())
(t2,Set())
(t4,Set(x))
(x,Set(t1, t2))
share|improve this answer

It turns out that this sort of parsing is of interest to me also, so I've done a bit more work on it.

There seems to be a sentiment that things like simplification of expressions is hard. I'm not so sure. Let's take a look at a fairly complete solution. (The printing out of tn expressions is not useful for me, and you've got several Scala examples already, so I'll skip that.)

First, we need to extract the various parts of the language. I'll pick regular expressions, though parser combinators could be used also:

object OpParser {
  val Natural = "([0-9]+)"r
  val Number = """((?:-)?[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]+)?(?:[eE](?:-)?[0-9]+)?)"""r
  val Variable = "([a-z])"r
  val Unary = "(exp|sin|cos|tan|sqrt)"r
  val Binary = "([-+*/^])"r
  val Nary = "(sum|prod|list)"r

Pretty straightforward. We define the various things that might appear. (I've decided that user-defined variables can only be a single lowercase letter, and that numbers can be floating-point since you have the exp function.) The r at the end means this is a regular expression, and it will give us the stuff in parentheses.

Now we need to represent our tree. There are a number of ways to do this, but I'll choose an abstract base class with specific expressions as case classes, since this makes pattern matching easy. Furthermore, we might want nice printing, so we'll override toString. Mostly, though, we'll use recursive functions to do the heavy lifting.

  abstract class Expr {
    def text: String
    def args: List[Expr]
    override def toString = args match {
      case l :: r :: Nil => "(" + l + " " + text + " " + r + ")"
      case Nil => text
      case _ => args.mkString(text+"(", ",", ")")
    }
  }
  case class Num(text: String, args: List[Expr]) extends Expr {
    val quantity = text.toDouble
  }
  case class Var(text: String, args: List[Expr]) extends Expr {
    override def toString = args match {
      case arg :: Nil => "(" + text + " <- " + arg + ")"
      case _ => text
    }
  }
  case class Una(text: String, args: List[Expr]) extends Expr
  case class Bin(text: String, args: List[Expr]) extends Expr
  case class Nar(text: String, args: List[Expr]) extends Expr {
    override def toString = text match {
      case "list" =>
        (for ((a,i) <- args.zipWithIndex) yield {
           "%3d: %s".format(i+1,a.toString)
        }).mkString("List[\n","\n","\n]")
      case _ => super.toString
    }
  }

Mostly this is pretty dull--each case class overrides the base class, and the text and args automatically fill in for the def. Note that I've decided that a list is a possible n-ary function, and that it will be printed out with line numbers. (The reason is that if you have multiple lines of input, it's sometimes more convenient to work with them all together as one expression; this lets them be one function.)

Once our data structures are defined, we need to parse the expressions. It's convenient to represent the stuff to parse as a list of tokens; as we parse, we'll return both an expression and the remaining tokens that we haven't parsed--this is a particularly useful structure for recursive parsing. Of course, we might fail to parse anything, so it had better be wrapped in an Option also.

  def parse(tokens: List[String]): Option[(Expr,List[String])] = tokens match {
    case Variable(x) :: "=" :: rest =>
      for ((expr,remains) <- parse(rest)) yield (Var(x,List(expr)), remains)
    case Variable(x) :: rest => Some(Var(x,Nil), rest)
    case Number(n) :: rest => Some(Num(n,Nil), rest)
    case Unary(u) :: rest =>
      for ((expr,remains) <- parse(rest)) yield (Una(u,List(expr)), remains)
    case Binary(b) :: rest =>
      for ((lexp,lrem) <- parse(rest); (rexp,rrem) <- parse(lrem)) yield
        (Bin(b,List(lexp,rexp)), rrem)
    case Nary(a) :: Natural(b) :: rest =>
      val buffer = new collection.mutable.ArrayBuffer[Expr]
      def parseN(tok: List[String], n: Int = b.toInt): List[String] = {
        if (n <= 0) tok
        else {
          for ((expr,remains) <- parse(tok)) yield { buffer += expr; parseN(remains, n-1) }
        }.getOrElse(tok)
      }
      val remains = parseN(rest)
      if (buffer.length == b.toInt) Some( Nar(a,buffer.toList), remains )
      else None
    case _ => None
  }

Note that we use pattern matching and recursion to do most of the heavy lifting--we pick off part of the list, figure out how many arguments we need, and pass those along recursively. The N-ary operation is a little less friendly, but we create a little recursive function that will parse N things at a time for us, storing the results in a buffer.

Of course, this is a little unfriendly to use, so we add some wrapper functions that let us interface with it nicely:

  def parse(s: String): Option[Expr] = parse(s.split(" ").toList).flatMap(x => {
    if (x._2.isEmpty) Some(x._1) else None
  })
  def parseLines(ls: List[String]): Option[Expr] = {
    val attempt = ls.map(parse).flatten
    if (attempt.length<ls.length) None
    else if (attempt.length==1) attempt.headOption
    else Some(Nar("list",attempt))
  }

Okay, now, what about simplification? One thing we might want to do is numeric simplification, where we precompute the expressions and replace the original expression with the reduced version thereof. That sounds like some sort of a recursive operation--find numbers, and combine them. First we get some helper functions to do calculations on numbers:

  def calc(n: Num, f: Double => Double): Num = Num(f(n.quantity).toString, Nil)
  def calc(n: Num, m: Num, f: (Double,Double) => Double): Num =
    Num(f(n.quantity,m.quantity).toString, Nil)
  def calc(ln: List[Num], f: (Double,Double) => Double): Num =
    Num(ln.map(_.quantity).reduceLeft(f).toString, Nil)

and then we do the simplification:

  def numericSimplify(expr: Expr): Expr = expr match {
    case Una(t,List(e)) => numericSimplify(e) match {
      case n @ Num(_,_) => t match {
        case "exp" => calc(n, math.exp _)
        case "sin" => calc(n, math.sin _)
        case "cos" => calc(n, math.cos _)
        case "tan" => calc(n, math.tan _)
        case "sqrt" => calc(n, math.sqrt _)
      }
      case a => Una(t,List(a))
    }
    case Bin(t,List(l,r)) => (numericSimplify(l), numericSimplify(r)) match {
      case (n @ Num(_,_), m @ Num(_,_)) => t match {
        case "+" => calc(n, m, _ + _)
        case "-" => calc(n, m, _ - _)
        case "*" => calc(n, m, _ * _)
        case "/" => calc(n, m, _ / _)
        case "^" => calc(n, m, math.pow)
      }
      case (a,b) => Bin(t,List(a,b))
    }
    case Nar("list",list) => Nar("list",list.map(numericSimplify))
    case Nar(t,list) =>
      val simple = list.map(numericSimplify)
      val nums = simple.collect { case n @ Num(_,_) => n }
      if (simple.length == 0) t match {
        case "sum" => Num("0",Nil)
        case "prod" => Num("1",Nil)
      }
      else if (nums.length == simple.length) t match {
        case "sum" => calc(nums, _ + _)
        case "prod" => calc(nums, _ * _)
      }
      else Nar(t, simple)
    case Var(t,List(e)) => Var(t, List(numericSimplify(e)))
    case _ => expr
  }

Notice again the heavy use of pattern matching to find when we're in a good case, and to dispatch the appropriate calculation.

Now, surely algebraic substitution is much more difficult! Actually, all you need to do is notice that an expression has already been used, and assign a variable. Since the syntax I've defined above allows in-place variable substitution, we can actually just modify our expression tree to include more variable assignments. So we do (edited to only insert variables if the user hasn't):

  def algebraicSimplify(expr: Expr): Expr = {
    val all, dup, used = new collection.mutable.HashSet[Expr]
    val made = new collection.mutable.HashMap[Expr,Int]
    val user = new collection.mutable.HashMap[Expr,Expr]
    def findExpr(e: Expr) {
      e match {
        case Var(t,List(v)) =>
          user += v -> e
          if (all contains e) dup += e else all += e
        case Var(_,_) | Num(_,_) => // Do nothing in these cases
        case _ => if (all contains e) dup += e else all += e
      }
      e.args.foreach(findExpr)
    }
    findExpr(expr)
    def replaceDup(e: Expr): Expr = {
      if (made contains e) Var("x"+made(e),Nil)
      else if (used contains e) Var(user(e).text,Nil)
      else if (dup contains e) {
        val fixed = replaceDupChildren(e)
        made += e -> made.size
        Var("x"+made(e),List(fixed))
      }
      else replaceDupChildren(e)
    }
    def replaceDupChildren(e: Expr): Expr = e match {
      case Una(t,List(u)) => Una(t,List(replaceDup(u)))
      case Bin(t,List(l,r)) => Bin(t,List(replaceDup(l),replaceDup(r)))
      case Nar(t,list) => Nar(t,list.map(replaceDup))
      case Var(t,List(v)) =>
        used += v
        Var(t,List(if (made contains v) replaceDup(v) else replaceDupChildren(v)))
      case _ => e
    }
    replaceDup(expr)
  }

That's it--a fully functional algebraic replacement routine. Note that it builds up sets of expressions that it's seen, keeping special track of which ones are duplicates. Thanks to the magic of case classes, all the equalities are defined for us, so it just works. Then we can replace any duplicates as we recurse through to find them. Note that the replace routine is split in half, and that it matches on an unreplaced version of the tree, but uses a replaced version.

Okay, now let's add a few tests:

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    val test1 = "- + ^ x 2 ^ y 2 1"
    val test2 = "+ + +"  // Bad!
    val test3 = "exp sin cos sum 5"  // Bad!
    val test4 = "+ * 2 3 ^ 3 2"
    val test5 = List(test1, test4, "^ y 2").mkString("list 3 "," ","")
    val test6 = "+ + x y + + * + x y + 4 5 * + x y + 4 y + + x y + 4 y"

    def performTest(test: String) = {
      println("Start with: " + test)
      val p = OpParser.parse(test)
      if (p.isEmpty) println("  Parsing failed")
      else {
        println("Parsed:     " + p.get)
        val q = OpParser.numericSimplify(p.get)
        println("Numeric:    " + q)
        val r = OpParser.algebraicSimplify(q)
        println("Algebraic:  " + r)
      }
      println
    }

    List(test1,test2,test3,test4,test5,test6).foreach(performTest)
  }
}

How does it do?

$ scalac OpParser.scala; scala OpParser
Start with: - + ^ x 2 ^ y 2 1
Parsed:     (((x ^ 2) + (y ^ 2)) - 1)
Numeric:    (((x ^ 2) + (y ^ 2)) - 1)
Algebraic:  (((x ^ 2) + (y ^ 2)) - 1)

Start with: + + +
  Parsing failed

Start with: exp sin cos sum 5
  Parsing failed

Start with: + * 2 3 ^ 3 2
Parsed:     ((2 * 3) + (3 ^ 2))
Numeric:    15.0
Algebraic:  15.0

Start with: list 3 - + ^ x 2 ^ y 2 1 + * 2 3 ^ 3 2 ^ y 2
Parsed:     List[
  1: (((x ^ 2) + (y ^ 2)) - 1)
  2: ((2 * 3) + (3 ^ 2))
  3: (y ^ 2)
]
Numeric:    List[
  1: (((x ^ 2) + (y ^ 2)) - 1)
  2: 15.0
  3: (y ^ 2)
]
Algebraic:  List[
  1: (((x ^ 2) + (x0 <- (y ^ 2))) - 1)
  2: 15.0
  3: x0
]

Start with: + + x y + + * + x y + 4 5 * + x y + 4 y + + x y + 4 y
Parsed:     ((x + y) + ((((x + y) * (4 + 5)) + ((x + y) * (4 + y))) + ((x + y) + (4 + y))))
Numeric:    ((x + y) + ((((x + y) * 9.0) + ((x + y) * (4 + y))) + ((x + y) + (4 + y))))
Algebraic:  ((x0 <- (x + y)) + (((x0 * 9.0) + (x0 * (x1 <- (4 + y)))) + (x0 + x1)))

So I don't know if that's useful for you, but it turns out to be useful for me. And this is the sort of thing that I would be very hesitant to tackle in C++ because various things that were supposed to be easy ended up being painful instead.


Edit: Here's an example of using this structure to print temporary assignments, just to demonstrate that this structure is perfectly okay for doing such things.

Code:

  def useTempVars(expr: Expr): Expr = {
    var n = 0
    def temp = { n += 1; "t"+n }
    def replaceTemp(e: Expr, exempt: Boolean = false): Expr = {
      def varify(x: Expr) = if (exempt) x else Var(temp,List(x))
      e match {
        case Var(t,List(e)) => Var(t,List(replaceTemp(e, exempt = true)))
        case Una(t,List(u)) => varify( Una(t, List(replaceTemp(u,false))) )
        case Bin(t,lr) => varify( Bin(t, lr.map(replaceTemp(_,false))) )
        case Nar(t,ls) => varify( Nar(t, ls.map(replaceTemp(_,false))) )
        case _ => e
      }
    }
    replaceTemp(expr)
  }
  def varCut(expr: Expr): Expr = expr match {
    case Var(t,_) => Var(t,Nil)
    case Una(t,List(u)) => Una(t,List(varCut(u)))
    case Bin(t,lr) => Bin(t, lr.map(varCut))
    case Nar(t,ls) => Nar(t, ls.map(varCut))
    case _ => expr
  }
  def getAssignments(expr: Expr): List[Expr] = {
    val children = expr.args.flatMap(getAssignments)
    expr match {
      case Var(t,List(e)) => children :+ expr
      case _ => children
    }
  }
  def listAssignments(expr: Expr): List[String] = {
    getAssignments(expr).collect(e => e match {
      case Var(t,List(v)) => t + " = " + varCut(v)
    }) :+ (expr.text + " is the answer")
  }

Selected results (from listAssignments(useTempVars(r)).foreach(printf(" %s\n",_))):

Start with: - + ^ x 2 ^ y 2 1
Assignments:
  t1 = (x ^ 2)
  t2 = (y ^ 2)
  t3 = (t1 + t2)
  t4 = (t3 - 1)
  t4 is the answer

Start with: + + x y + + * + x y + 4 5 * + x y + 4 y + + x y + 4 y
Algebraic:  ((x0 <- (x + y)) + (((x0 * 9.0) + (x0 * (x1 <- (4 + y)))) + (x0 + x1)))
Assignments:
  x0 = (x + y)
  t1 = (x0 * 9.0)
  x1 = (4 + y)
  t2 = (x0 * x1)
  t3 = (t1 + t2)
  t4 = (x0 + x1)
  t5 = (t3 + t4)
  t6 = (x0 + t5)
  t6 is the answer

Second edit: finding dependencies is also not too bad.

Code:

  def directDepends(expr: Expr): Set[Expr] = expr match {
    case Var(t,_) => Set(expr)
    case _ => expr.args.flatMap(directDepends).toSet
  }
  def indirectDepends(expr: Expr) = {
    val depend = getAssignments(expr).map(e => 
      e -> e.args.flatMap(directDepends).toSet
    ).toMap
    val tagged = for ((k,v) <- depend) yield (k.text -> v.map(_.text))
    def percolate(tags: Map[String,Set[String]]): Option[Map[String,Set[String]]] = {
      val expand = for ((k,v) <- tags) yield (
        k -> (v union v.flatMap(x => tags.get(x).getOrElse(Set())))
      )
      if (tags.exists(kv => expand(kv._1) contains kv._1)) None  // Cyclic dependency!
      else if (tags == expand) Some(tags)
      else percolate(expand)
    }
    percolate(tagged)
  }
  def listDependents(expr: Expr): List[(String,String)] = {
    def sayNothing(s: String) = if (s=="") "nothing" else s
    val e = expr match {
      case Var(_,_) => expr
      case _ => Var("result",List(expr))
    }
    indirectDepends(e).map(_.toList.map(x =>
      (x._1, sayNothing(x._2.toList.sorted.mkString(" ")))
    )).getOrElse(List((e.text,"cyclic")))
  }

And if we add new test cases val test7 = "list 3 z = ^ x 2 - + z ^ y 2 1 w = - z y" and val test8 = "list 2 x = y y = x" and show the answers with for ((v,d) <- listDependents(r)) println(" "+v+" requires "+d) we get (selected results):

Start with: - + ^ x 2 ^ y 2 1
Dependencies:
  result requires x y

Start with: list 3 z = ^ x 2 - + z ^ y 2 1 w = - z y
Parsed:     List[
  1: (z <- (x ^ 2))
  2: ((z + (y ^ 2)) - 1)
  3: (w <- (z - y))
]
Dependencies:
  z requires x
  w requires x y z
  result requires w x y z

Start with: list 2 x = y y = x
Parsed:     List[
  1: (x <- y)
  2: (y <- x)
]
Dependencies:
  result requires cyclic

Start with: + + x y + + * + x y + 4 5 * + x y + 4 y + + x y + 4 y
Algebraic:  ((x0 <- (x + y)) + (((x0 * 9.0) + (x0 * (x1 <- (4 + y)))) + (x0 + x1)))
Dependencies:
  x0 requires x y
  x1 requires y
  result requires x x0 x1 y

So I think that on top of this sort of structure, all of your individual requirements are met by blocks of one or two dozen lines of Scala code.


Edit: here's expression evaluation, if you're given a mapping from vars to values:

  def numericEvaluate(expr: Expr, initialValues: Map[String,Double]) = {
    val chain = new collection.mutable.ArrayBuffer[(String,Double)]
    val evaluated = new collection.mutable.HashMap[String,Double]
    def note(xv: (String,Double)) { chain += xv; evaluated += xv }
    evaluated ++= initialValues
    def substitute(expr: Expr): Expr = expr match {
      case Var(t,List(n @ Num(v,_))) => { note(t -> v.toDouble); n }
      case Var(t,_) if (evaluated contains t) => Num(evaluated(t).toString,Nil)
      case Var(t,ls) => Var(t,ls.map(substitute))
      case Una(t,List(u)) => Una(t,List(substitute(u)))
      case Bin(t,ls) => Bin(t,ls.map(substitute))
      case Nar(t,ls) => Nar(t,ls.map(substitute))
      case _ => expr
    }
    def recurse(e: Expr): Expr = {
      val sub = numericSimplify(substitute(e))
      if (sub == e) e else recurse(sub)
    }
    (recurse(expr), chain.toList)
  }

and it's used like so in the testing routine:

        val (num,ops) = numericEvaluate(r,Map("x"->3,"y"->1.5))
        println("Evaluated:")
        for ((v,n) <- ops) println("  "+v+" = "+n)
        println("  result = " + num)

giving results like these (with input of x = 3 and y = 1.5):

Start with: list 3 - + ^ x 2 ^ y 2 1 + * 2 3 ^ 3 2 ^ y 2
Algebraic:  List[
  1: (((x ^ 2) + (x0 <- (y ^ 2))) - 1)
  2: 15.0
  3: x0
]
Evaluated:
  x0 = 2.25
  result = List[
  1: 10.25
  2: 15.0
  3: 2.25
]

Start with: list 3 z = ^ x 2 - + z ^ y 2 1 w = - z y
Algebraic:  List[
  1: (z <- (x ^ 2))
  2: ((z + (y ^ 2)) - 1)
  3: (w <- (z - y))
]
Evaluated:
  z = 9.0
  w = 7.5
  result = List[
  1: 9.0
  2: 10.25
  3: 7.5
]

The other challenge--picking out the vars that haven't already been used--is just set subtraction off of the dependencies result list. diff is the name of the set subtraction method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! For me, the major problem is that I have to answer different questions after parsing the input. While a particular data structure is good for answering one question, it may be really painful to answer a different question with the same data structure. Parsing is just one part of this complex problem. What do you use this sort of parsing for? –  Ali Jan 31 '11 at 17:48
    
What question do you think is difficult to answer with this data structure? I am playing with a mini-language for expression evaluation inside a data analysis framework. So things like common expression elimination are useful for me. But I didn't choose this structure to be good at that specifically. –  Rex Kerr Jan 31 '11 at 18:18
    
Examples. 1. The variables (here letters) are given numerical values. Task: evaluate a given expression from the input expressions. It is tricky because you have to evaluate the common subexpressions (CSE) first which in turn may depend on other subexpressions and variables. 2. Some of the expressions from the input have been evaluated, they depend on certain variables. Determine for a given not yet evaluated expression which variables and CSEs were not used in the previous evaluations but are needed to evalutate the given expression. –  Ali Jan 31 '11 at 21:09
    
Ali - Both of those are simple extensions of what's already there. The numeric and algebraic simplification code can easily be altered to do an evaluation given a mapping from variable name to value. And I'm already (after edits) printing out the required variables, so that's just set subtraction. After algebraic simplification, though, there are no common subexpressions left. –  Rex Kerr Jan 31 '11 at 21:28
    
Rex - I belive you, I just do not understand Scala :) How difficult would it be to change the code to use a user defined datatype instead of real numbers (double)? In C++ I use templates. –  Ali Jan 31 '11 at 23:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem consists of two subproblems: parsing and symbolic manipulation. It seems to me the answer boils down to two possible solutions.

One is to implement everything from scratch: "I do recommend creating the full expression tree if you want to retain maximum flexibility for handling tricky cases." - proposed by Rex. As Sven points out: "any of the high-level languages you listed are almost equally suited for the task," however "Python (or any of the high-level languages you listed) won't take away the complexity of the problem."
I have received very nice solutions in Scala (many thanks for Rex and Daniel), a nice little example in Python (from Sven). However, I am still interested in Lisp, Haskell or Erlang solutions.

The other solution is to use some existing library/software for the task, with all the implied pros and cons. Candidates are Maxima (Common Lisp), SymPy (Python, proposed by payne) and GiNaC (C++).

share|improve this answer

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