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I get an array of bytes, I need to unmarshal it to C# struct. I know the type of the struct, it has some strings fields. The strings in the byte array appears as so: two first bytes are the length of the string, then the string itself. I don;t know the length of the strings. I do know that its Unicode!

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
public class User
{
  int Id;//should be 1
  String UserName;//should be OFIR
  String FullName;//should be OFIR
}

the byte array looks like so: 00,00,01,00, 00,00,08,00, 4F,00,46,00,49,00,52,00, 00,00,08,00, 4F,00,46,00,49,00,52,00,

I also found this link with same problem unsolved: loading binary data into a structure

Thank you all, Ofir

share|improve this question
    
Ofir, suggested edits are not meant as a means of communication, if you would like to add a comment or expand your question feel free. – Sam Saffron Jan 31 '11 at 10:06
    
How do you get the 1 from the byte array? An int is 4 bytes, which would be {00, 00, 01, 00}, which isn't 1. – Amy Feb 1 '11 at 21:51
    
Please see my 'answer'. I need more information. Knowing the byte array isn't enough. What does the native structure look like? – Amy Feb 1 '11 at 22:03

I would do it with a BinaryReader. This would go along these lines:

Foo ReadFoo(Byte[] bytes)
{
     Foo foo = new Foo();
     BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(new MemoryStream(bytes));
     foo.ID = reader.ReadUInt32();
     int userNameCharCount = reader.ReadUInt32();
     foo.UserName = new String(reader.ReadChars(userNameCharCount));

     int fullNameCharCount = reader.ReadUInt32();
     foo.FullName = new String(reader.ReadChars(fullNameCharCount));
     return foo;
}

Please note this will not work directly for the byte array example you provided. The char counts and the ID field are not in standard little endian or bigendian order. It could be that the fields are 16 bit, and that they are prepended with 16 bit padding fields. Who generated the this bytestream?

But the exact format isn't too important for this strategy, as you can just change ReadInt32 into ReadInt16, reorder them, whatever, to make it work.

I am not to fond of the serializer attributes. That is because it couples your internal data structures to how it is exchanged. This breaks in case you need to support multiple versions of the dataformat.

share|improve this answer

This isn't an answer (yet) but is a question/comment with a sizable amount of code for feedback. How do you interpret your byte array? Break it down.

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
struct Foo
{
    public int id;

    //[MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.BStr)]
    //public string A;

    //[MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.BStr)]
    //public string B;
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    byte[] bits = new byte[] {
        0x00, 0x00, 
        0x01, 0x00, 
        0x00, 0x00, 
        0x08, 0x00,     // Length prefix?               
        0x4F, 0x00,     // Start OFIR?
        0x46, 0x00, 
        0x49, 0x00,     
        0x52, 0x00,     
        0x00, 0x00, 
        0x08, 0x00,     // Length prefix?
        0x4F, 0x00,     // Start OFIR?
        0x46, 0x00, 
        0x49, 0x00, 
        0x52, 0x00 };   

    GCHandle pinnedPacket = GCHandle.Alloc(bits, GCHandleType.Pinned);
    Foo msg = (Foo)Marshal.PtrToStructure(
        pinnedPacket.AddrOfPinnedObject(),
        typeof(Foo));
    pinnedPacket.Free();
}
share|improve this answer

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