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Can someone help me with a JavaScript riddle?

Consider the following JavaScript code:

var a[];

for (i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    a[i] = function(){alert ("I am " + i);};
}

a[5]();

Now obviously, the last line will cause the alert to read "I am 9", and not "I am 5", since the value of i is 9 at the end of the for loop.

I want the alert to print "what it is supposed to", but without changing the way which I call functions from the array, i.e. - no parameters.

A hint I received: try defining a function which calls another function.

Please help!!! Thank you :-)

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The hint you received is a little deceptive. You don't want to define a function that calls another (you'd have the same problem). Rather, you want to define one that returns another.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/sX92Q/

var a = [];

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    a[i] = alertFunc(i);
}

   // return a function that closes around the proper value of "i"
function alertFunc(i){
    return function() {
        alert(i);
    };
};

a[5]();

This is effectively the same as those that use an anonymous function in the loop, but it is more efficient since the anonymous function doesn't need to be reconstructed each iteration.

Generally, you don't want to create duplicate functions in a loop.


Side note. In javascript, this:

var a[];

should be:

var a = [];
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1  
elegant and good explaned also the comment below! +1 –  aSeptik Jan 30 '11 at 16:40

This works:

var a = [];

for (i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    a[i] = (function(i) {
        return function(){alert ("I am " + i);};
    })(i);
}

a[5]();

In your example, the anonymous function holds a reference to the i variable, however this variable is modified after the function's creation. So at the time you call the function, you see that modified value.

To avoid that, you must make a copy of that variable, which is what the code above does.

Alternatively, in Javascript 1.7 you would use let definitions:

for (i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    let j = i;
    a[i] = function(){alert ("I am " + j);};
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much! –  Tom Teman Jan 30 '11 at 16:36
var a[];

for (i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    a[i] = function(){alert ("I am " + i);};
}

a[i = 5]();

Cheat since (i = 5) === 5

Don't actaully do this

Use one of the real solutions above.

Alternatively:

var a = [];

for (i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    (function(j) {
        a[j] = function() { 
            alert ("I am " + j);
        };
    }(i)) 
}

a[i]();

Use a closure to make j the current value of i

share|improve this answer
    
very bad solution... –  levu Jan 30 '11 at 16:03
    
@levu but it's a fun think outside the box solution! If it's an interview question I much rather answer with that instead. –  Raynos Jan 30 '11 at 16:04
    
i would say this is no solution for his problem ;) This occurs to be a solution. It's like genotype vs. phenotype. This is a phenotype solution. –  levu Jan 30 '11 at 16:06
    
@levu in Lawman's terms? –  Raynos Jan 30 '11 at 16:08
1  
a[5]() still alerts I am 10 –  arnaud576875 Jan 30 '11 at 16:18

The following code will work:

var a[];

for (i=0;i<10;i++)
{
    a[i] = (function(i) {
        return function(){alert ("I am " + i);};
   })(i);
}

a[5]();

Here i is converted to a local variable.

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1  
-1 @levu you actaully need to return the function. You just defined a[i] to be undefined here. –  Raynos Jan 30 '11 at 16:19
    
@raynos: u r right :) –  levu Jan 30 '11 at 17:19

The reason your first example doesn't work is, the data has to be stored somewhere. You've got ten different values to store, but only one i variable, so it doesn't work.

Other posters suggest using closure, which works, but your question is looking for a way to do it without calling functions. I'd suggest this:

var a = [];
for (i=0; i<10; i++) {
  a[i] = function(i){alert("I am " + i);};
}
a[5](5);

Of course this makes one wonder, why even have ten different functions when they all do the same thing? Why not just:

var whoAmI = function(i){ alert("I am " + i); };
whoAmI(5);

Perhaps you need a function that you can pass around to some external API which calls it with no arguments? In that case do the closure function-that-makes-a-function thing.

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i'm sorry i can't vote +2 ;) –  aSeptik Jan 30 '11 at 16:22
2  
This doesn't really answer the question. There are times when you do need to close around the current value of i in a loop with a function that will remember that value in order to reference something else with the same index. I'm pretty sure this is just a simple example to explain the concept. –  user113716 Jan 30 '11 at 16:23
    
Sure there's any number of possibilities, but if you know the index to figure out which of the 10 functions to call, you could just as easily pass that information in. Then again you do sometimes need parameterless functions (jQuery success callbacks, etc). I'm not sure what this poster wants. –  darkporter Jan 30 '11 at 19:21

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