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Is there a difference in ++i and i++ in a for loop? Is it simply a syntax thing?

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1  
Dupe: stackoverflow.com/questions/467322/… –  Jon B Jan 27 '09 at 18:07
    
I dont think it should have language tags the unary operators are in (most) languages... –  Omar Kooheji Jan 27 '09 at 18:07
4  
I'm amazed at how many answers completely missed the point of the question. –  Graeme Perrow Jan 27 '09 at 18:28
2  
Perhaps we should be amazed that no one edited the question to be more clear :) –  Jon B Jan 27 '09 at 18:37
1  
This question could apply to C, Java, C++, PHP, C#, Javascript, JScript, Objective C: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:C_programming_language_family –  Chris S Jan 28 '09 at 0:03
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14 Answers

up vote 49 down vote accepted

a++ is known as postfix.

add 1 to a, returns the old value.

++a is known as prefix.

add 1 to a, returns the new value.

C#:

string[] items = {"a","b","c","d"};
int i = 0;
foreach (string item in items)
{
    Console.WriteLine(++i);
}
Console.WriteLine("");

i = 0;
foreach (string item in items)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i++);
}

Output:

1
2
3
4

0
1
2
3

foreach and while loops depend on which increment type you use. With for loops like below it makes no difference as you're not using the return value of i:

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) { Console.Write(i);}
Console.WriteLine("");
for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i) { Console.Write(i); }

0 1 2 3 4
0 1 2 3 4

If you use the value as below then clearly it will be significant which increment type is used:

int n = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 5;n = i++) { }
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30  
Am I the only one who is perplexed as to why this is the accepted answer? –  Jon B Jan 27 '09 at 21:15
9  
No Jon. I'm just as perplexed on how it go so many upvotes. –  grom Jan 27 '09 at 22:18
    
@GraemePerrow - I removed my comment above as you make a point in the comment above since this topic is very old and edited many times. –  IForti Nov 2 '13 at 17:34
    
@IForti - Fair enough. I will do the same. –  Graeme Perrow Nov 2 '13 at 17:55
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Pre-increment ++i increments the value of i and evaluates to the new incremented value.

int i = 3;
int preIncrementResult = ++i;
Assert( preIncrementResult == 4 );
Assert( i == 4 );

Post-increment i++ increments the value of i and evaluates to the original non-incremented value.

int i = 3;
int postIncrementResult = i++;
Assert( postIncrementtResult == 3 );
Assert( i == 4 );

In C++, the pre-increment is usually prefered where you can use either.

This is because if you use post-increment, it can require the compiler to have to generate code that creates an extra temporary variable. This is because both the previous and new values of the variable being incremented need to be held somewhere because they may be needed elsewhere in the expression being evaluated.

So, in C++ at least, there can be a performance difference which guides your choice of which to use.

This is mainly only a problem when the variable being incremented is a user defined type with an overridden ++ operator. For primitive types (int, etc) there's no performance difference. But, it's worth sticking to the pre-increment operator as a guideline unless the post-increment operator is definitely what's required.

There's some more discussion here:
http://en.allexperts.com/q/C-1040/Increment-operators.htm

In C++ if you're using STL, then you may be using for loops with iterators. These mainly have overridden ++ operators, so sticking to pre-increment is a good idea. Compilers get smarter all the time though, and newer ones may be able to perform optimizations that mean there's no performance difference - especially if the type being incremented is defined inline in header file (as STL implementations often are) so that the compiler can see how the method is implemented and can then know what optimizations are safe to perform. Even so, it's probably still worth sticking to pre-increment because loops get executed lots of times and this means a small performance penalty could soon get amplified.


In other languages such as C# where the ++ operator can't be overloaded there is no performance difference. Used in a loop to advance the loop variable, the pre and post increment operators are equivalent.

Correction: overloading ++ in C# is allowed. It seems though, that compared to c++, in c# you cannot overload the pre and post versions independently. So, I would assume that if the result of calling ++ in C# is not assigned to a variable or used as part of a complex expression, then the compiler would reduce the pre and post versions of ++ down to code that performs equivalently.

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24  
Wouldn't it have been great if C++ was named ++C indicating that you can write a well optimized code using it.. –  Naveen Jan 27 '09 at 18:27
2  
Shouldn't modern compilers be able to optimize this when the resulting value is obviously going to be trashed anyway? –  che Jan 27 '09 at 18:29
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@che - they do when it's a simple type, however classes that overload operator++ (such as iterators) are a different story. –  Ferruccio Jan 27 '09 at 18:55
4  
@che: That's a good question. The reason that C++ compilers don't replace "CustomType++;" with "++CustomType;" is because there's no guarantee that both user-defined functions have the same effect. They SHOULD...but there's no guarantee. –  Drew Dormann Jan 27 '09 at 20:11
1  
@michael.bartnett: Good point, overloading ++ in C# does appear to be available. It seems though, that compared to c++, in c# you cannot overload the pre and post versions independently. So, I would assume that if the result of calling ++ in C# is not assigned to a variable or used as part of a complex expression, then the compiler would reduce the pre and post versions of ++ down to code that performs equivalently. –  Scott Langham Oct 25 '12 at 9:51
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In c# there is no difference when used in a for loop.

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { Console.WriteLine(i); }

outputs the same thing as

for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) { Console.WriteLine(i); }

As others have pointed out, when used in general i++ and ++i have a subtle yet significant difference:

int i = 0;
Console.WriteLine(i++);   // Prints 0
int j = 0;
Console.WriteLine(++j);   // Prints 1

i++ reads the value of i then increments it.

++i increments the value of i then reads it.

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Concluding: the same post / pre increment semantics as in C++. –  xtofl Jan 27 '09 at 18:26
    
@xtofl - not sure what your point is? I just happened to pick c# for my example. –  Jon B Jan 27 '09 at 18:30
1  
I don't think that the first point is relevant. In a for loop (c# or not) the increment part is always executed after the body of the loop. Once executed, the variable is modified whether post or pre increment was used. –  MatthieuP Jan 27 '09 at 21:28
5  
@MatthieuP - I read the question as "does it matter whether you use i++ or ++i in a for loop". The answer is "no it does not". –  Jon B Jan 27 '09 at 21:54
    
@Jon B - Just a sidenote. Making links, that's all. –  xtofl Jan 27 '09 at 22:03
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Since you ask about the difference in a loop, i guess you mean

for(int i=0; i<10; i++) 
    ...;

In that case, you have no difference in most languages: The loop behaves the same regardless of whether you write i++ and ++i. In C++, you can write your own versions of the ++ operators, and you can define separate meanings for them, if the i is of a user defined type (your own class, for example).

The reason why it doesn't matter above is because you don't use the value of i++. Another thing is when you do

for(int i=0, a = 0; i<10; a = i++) 
    ...;

Now, there is a difference, because as others point out, i++ means increment, but evaluate to the previous value, but ++i means increment, but evaluate to i (thus it would evaluate to the new value). In the above case, a is assigned the previous value of i, while i is incremented.

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In C++, it is not always possible for the compiler to avoid making the temporary, so the pre-increment form is preferred. –  David Thornley Jan 27 '09 at 18:11
    
as i write, if you have an i of user defined type, they could have different semantics. but if you use an i of primitive type, then it does not make a difference for the first loop. as this is a language agnostic question, i figured not to write too much about C++ specific stuff. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 27 '09 at 18:32
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As this code shows (see the dissambled MSIL in the comments), the C# 3 compiler makes no distinction between i++ and ++i in a for loop. If the value of i++ or ++i were being taken, there would definitely be a difference (this was compiled in Visutal Studio 2008 / Release Build):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace PreOrPostIncrement
{
    class Program
    {
        static int SomethingToIncrement;

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            PreIncrement(1000);
            PostIncrement(1000);
            Console.WriteLine("SomethingToIncrement={0}", SomethingToIncrement);
        }

        static void PreIncrement(int count)
        {
            /*
            .method private hidebysig static void  PreIncrement(int32 count) cil managed
            {
              // Code size       25 (0x19)
              .maxstack  2
              .locals init ([0] int32 i)
              IL_0000:  ldc.i4.0
              IL_0001:  stloc.0
              IL_0002:  br.s       IL_0014
              IL_0004:  ldsfld     int32 PreOrPostIncrement.Program::SomethingToIncrement
              IL_0009:  ldc.i4.1
              IL_000a:  add
              IL_000b:  stsfld     int32 PreOrPostIncrement.Program::SomethingToIncrement
              IL_0010:  ldloc.0
              IL_0011:  ldc.i4.1
              IL_0012:  add
              IL_0013:  stloc.0
              IL_0014:  ldloc.0
              IL_0015:  ldarg.0
              IL_0016:  blt.s      IL_0004
              IL_0018:  ret
            } // end of method Program::PreIncrement             
             */
            for (int i = 0; i < count; ++i)
            {
                ++SomethingToIncrement;
            }
        }

        static void PostIncrement(int count)
        {
            /*
                .method private hidebysig static void  PostIncrement(int32 count) cil managed
                {
                  // Code size       25 (0x19)
                  .maxstack  2
                  .locals init ([0] int32 i)
                  IL_0000:  ldc.i4.0
                  IL_0001:  stloc.0
                  IL_0002:  br.s       IL_0014
                  IL_0004:  ldsfld     int32 PreOrPostIncrement.Program::SomethingToIncrement
                  IL_0009:  ldc.i4.1
                  IL_000a:  add
                  IL_000b:  stsfld     int32 PreOrPostIncrement.Program::SomethingToIncrement
                  IL_0010:  ldloc.0
                  IL_0011:  ldc.i4.1
                  IL_0012:  add
                  IL_0013:  stloc.0
                  IL_0014:  ldloc.0
                  IL_0015:  ldarg.0
                  IL_0016:  blt.s      IL_0004
                  IL_0018:  ret
                } // end of method Program::PostIncrement
             */
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                SomethingToIncrement++;
            }
        }
    }
}
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One (++i) is preincrement, one (i++) is postincrement. The difference is in what value is immediately returned from the expression.

// Psuedocode
int i = 0;
print i++; // Prints 0
print i; // Prints 1
int j = 0;
print ++j; // Prints 1
print j; // Prints 1

Edit: Woops, entirely ignored the loop side of things. There's no actual difference in for loops when it's the 'step' portion (for(...; ...; )), but it can come into play in other cases.

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How does this answer the question about loops? –  Adam Peck Jan 27 '09 at 17:57
    
Also, the second (++i) should be (i++) –  Brett Daniel Jan 27 '09 at 18:01
    
Thanks Adam, helps to actually answer the question asked :P –  Cody Brocious Jan 27 '09 at 18:01
    
Thanks Brett, just saw your comment -- caught it about the same time you did haha. –  Cody Brocious Jan 27 '09 at 18:18
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Yes, there is. The difference is in the return value. The return value of "++i" will be the value after incrementing i. The return of "i++" will be the value before incrementing. This means that code that looks like the following:

int a = 0;
int b = ++a; // a is incremented and the result after incrementing is saved to b.
int c = a++; // a is incremented again and the result before incremening is saved to c.

Therefore, a would be 2, and b and c would each be 1.

I could rewrite the code like this:

int a = 0; 

// ++a;
a = a + 1; // incrementing first.
b = a; // setting second. 

// a++;
c = a; // setting first. 
a = a + 1; // incrementing second.
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I think you meant to write int c = a++; (not b++, right?) –  David Kolar Jan 27 '09 at 18:10
    
Yes. Thanks. :) –  David Morton Jan 27 '09 at 20:47
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Here is a Java-Sample and the Byte-Code, post- and preIncrement show no difference in Bytecode:

public class PreOrPostIncrement {

static int somethingToIncrement = 0;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final int rounds = 1000;
    postIncrement(rounds);
    preIncrement(rounds);
}

private static void postIncrement(final int rounds) {
    for (int i = 0; i < rounds; i++) {
        somethingToIncrement++;
    }
}

private static void preIncrement(final int rounds) {
    for (int i = 0; i < rounds; ++i) {
        ++somethingToIncrement;
    }
}

}

And now for the byte-code (javap -private -c PreOrPostIncrement):

public class PreOrPostIncrement extends java.lang.Object{
static int somethingToIncrement;

static {};
Code:
0:  iconst_0
1:  putstatic	#10; //Field somethingToIncrement:I
4:  return

public PreOrPostIncrement();
Code:
0:  aload_0
1:  invokespecial	#15; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
4:  return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
Code:
0:  sipush	1000
3:  istore_1
4:  sipush	1000
7:  invokestatic	#21; //Method postIncrement:(I)V
10: sipush	1000
13: invokestatic	#25; //Method preIncrement:(I)V
16: return

private static void postIncrement(int);
Code:
0:  iconst_0
1:  istore_1
2:  goto	16
5:  getstatic	#10; //Field somethingToIncrement:I
8:  iconst_1
9:  iadd
10: putstatic	#10; //Field somethingToIncrement:I
13: iinc	1, 1
16: iload_1
17: iload_0
18: if_icmplt	5
21: return

private static void preIncrement(int);
Code:
0:  iconst_0
1:  istore_1
2:  goto	16
5:  getstatic	#10; //Field somethingToIncrement:I
8:  iconst_1
9:  iadd
10: putstatic	#10; //Field somethingToIncrement:I
13: iinc	1, 1
16: iload_1
17: iload_0
18: if_icmplt	5
21: return

}
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There is no actual difference in both cases 'i' will be incremented by 1.

But there is a difference when you use it in an expression, for example:

int i = 1;
int a = ++i;
// i is incremented by one and then assigned to a.
// Both i and a are now 2.
int b = i++;
// i is assigned to b and then incremented by one.
// b is now 2, and i is now 3
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There is more to ++i and i++ than loops and performance differences. ++i returns a l-value and i++ returns an r-value. Based on this, there are many things you can do to ( ++i ) but not to ( i++ ).

1- It is illegal to take the address of post increment result. Compiler won't even allow you.
2- Only constant references to post increment can exist, i.e., of the form const T&.
3- You cannot apply another post increment or decrement to the result of i++, i.e., there is no such thing as I++++. This would be parsed as ( i ++ ) ++ which is illegal.
4- When overloading pre-/post-increment and decrement operators, programmers are encouraged to define post- increment/decrement operators like:

T& operator ++ ( )
{
   // logical increment
   return *this;
}

const T operator ++ ( int )
{
    T temp( *this );
    ++*this;
    return temp;
}
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In javascript due to the following i++ may be better to use:

var i=1;
alert(i++); // before, 1. current, 1. after, 2.
alert(i); // before, 2. current, 2. after, 2.
alert(++i); // before, 2. current, 3 after, 3.

While arrays (I think all) and some other functions and calls use 0 as a starting point you would have to set i to -1 to make the loop work with the array when using ++i.

When using i++ the following value will use the increased value. You could say i++ is the way humans count, cause you can start with a 0.

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As @Jon B says, there is no difference in a for loop.

But in a while or do...while loop, you could find some differences if you are making a comparison with the ++i or i++

while(i++ < 10) { ... } //compare then increment

while(++i < 10) { ... } //increment then compare
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two downvotes? What is wrong with what I wrote? And it is related to the question (as vague as it is). –  crashmstr Jan 27 '09 at 20:56
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There can be a difference for loops. This is the practical application of post/pre-increment.

        int i = 0;
        while(i++ <= 10) {
            Console.Write(i);
        }
        Console.Write(System.Environment.NewLine);

        i = 0;
        while(++i <= 10) {
            Console.Write(i);
        }
        Console.ReadLine();

While the first one counts to 11 and loops 11 times, the second does not.

Mostly this is rather used in a simple while(x-- > 0 ) ; - - Loop to iterate for example all elements of an array (exempting foreach-constructs here).

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For i's of user-defined types, these operators could (but should not) have meaningfully different sematics in the context of a loop index, and this could (but should not) affect the behavior of the loop described.

Also, in c++ it is generally safest to use the pre-increment form (++i) because it is more easily optimized. (Scott Langham beat me to this tidbit. Curse you, Scott)

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The semantics of postfix are supposed to be bigger than prefix. -1 –  xtofl Jan 27 '09 at 18:34
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