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I need to build python bindings for a C++ codebase. I use boost::python and I ran into problems trying to expose classes containing functions using and returning templates. Here is a typical example

class Foo 
{ 
    public: 
        Foo(); 
        template<typename T> Foo& setValue(
            const string& propertyName, const T& value); 
        template<typename T> const T& getValue(
            const string& propertyName); 
}; 

Typical T are string, double, vector.

After reading the documentation, I tried using thin wrappers for every type used. Here are the wrappers for string and double and the corresponding class declaration.

Foo & (Foo::*setValueDouble)(const std::string&,const double &) = 
    &Foo::setValue; 
const double & (Foo::*getValueDouble)(const std::string&) = 
    &Foo::getValue;

Foo & (Foo::*setValueString)(const std::string&,const std::string &) = 
    &Foo::setValue; 
const std::string & (Foo::*getValueString)(const std::string&) = 
    &Foo::getValue;

class_<Foo>("Foo") 
    .def("setValue",setValueDouble, 
        return_value_policy<reference_existing_object>()) 
    .def("getValue",getValueDouble,
        return_value_policy<copy_const_reference>()) 
    .def("getValue",getValueString, 
        return_value_policy<copy_const_reference>()) 
    .def("setValue",setValueString, 
        return_value_policy<reference_existing_object>());

It compiles ok but when I try to use the python bindings, I get a C++ exception.

>>> f = Foo()  
>>> f.setValue("key",1.0) 
>>> f.getValue("key") 
Traceback (most recent call last): 
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in ? 
  RuntimeError: unidentifiable C++ exception

Interestingly, when I only expose Foo for double or string value, i.e

class_<Foo>("Foo") 
    .def("getValue",getValueString, 
        return_value_policy<copy_const_reference>()) 
    .def("setValue",setValueString, 
        return_value_policy<reference_existing_object>());

It works fine. Am I missing something?

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1  
you might want to look at the thread at mail.python.org/pipermail/cplusplus-sig/2006-February/… (which tackles a similar problem: wrapping boost::any) –  lijie Jan 31 '11 at 15:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This may not be related to your problem directly but I would not trust function signature casting with templates like that. I would have wrapped it like this:

class_<Foo>("Foo") 
    .def("setValue", &Foo::setValue<double>, 
        return_value_policy<reference_existing_object>()) 
    .def("getValue", &Foo::getValue<double>,
        return_value_policy<copy_const_reference>()) 
    .def("getValue", &Foo::getValue<std::string>, 
        return_value_policy<copy_const_reference>()) 
    .def("setValue", &Foo::setValue<std::string>, 
        return_value_policy<reference_existing_object>());

If that does not work, you may need to create some shim functions:

Foo& setValueDouble(foo& self, const string& propertyName, const double value)
{ 
    return self.setValue(propertyName, value)
}
...

and export those as thought they were member functions.

Exporting multiple function overloads to the same name is a perfectly valid thing to do in Boost::Python, so I do not think that that is the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see any casting in the code in the question. That's how you declare a variable of type "pointer-to-member-function". –  Ben Voigt Jan 31 '11 at 17:48
    
It worked thanks. –  LouisChiffre Feb 1 '11 at 19:10

I suspect the problem is that boost::python does not know which overload to call for "getValue" - should it call getValueDouble or getValueString? If you bind them explicitly as getValueString and getValueDouble (as the method name) I bet it will work.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help. I tried what you suggest and it worked. But it makes the resulting python code more verbose since I have to use different getter depending on the value type. Maybe there is a more elegant way? –  LouisChiffre Jan 30 '11 at 19:06
    
This should not be necessary. Exporting multiple signatures to the same name is a perfectly valid thing to do in in Boost::Python. –  Matthew Scouten Jan 31 '11 at 16:35
    
@Louis: I don't understand how you want python to know which overload you want... Even in C++, you have to be verbose (as you say) by specifying the type: foo.getValue<double>(...) –  rafak Feb 1 '11 at 0:24
    
@rafak. You are correct. Thank you. I guess my C++ knowledge is a bit rusty right now. –  LouisChiffre Feb 1 '11 at 19:11

What about creating a C++ wrappers for getters/setters that return/take a boost::python::object? You can then simply determine the type you got in your C++ wrapper and wrap/unwrap it into/from boost::python::object.

struct FooWrap : public Foo
{
    using boost::python;
    Foo& setValueO(const string& propertyName, const object& obj)
    {
        object value;
        if(PyInt_Check(obj.ptr())) {
            return setValue<int>(propertyName, extract<int>(obj);
        } else if(PyFloat_Check(obj.ptr())) {
            return setValue<double>(propertyName, extract<double>(obj);
        } else if(PyString_Check(obj.ptr())) {
            return setValue<std::string>(propertyName, extract<std::string>(obj);
        }
        // etc...
    }

    object getValueO(const std::string& propertyName)
    {
        if(determineType() == TYPE_INT) { // however you determine the type
            return object(getValue<int>(propertyName));
        } else if(determineType() == TYPE_DOUBLE)   {
            return object(getValue<double>(propertyName));
        } else if(determineType() == TYPE_STRING)   {
            return object(getValue<std::string>(propertyName));
        }
        // etc...
    }
};

class_<Foo>("Foo") 
    .def("setValue", &FooWrap::setValueO, 
        return_value_policy<reference_existing_object>()) 
    .def("getValue", &FooWrap::getValueO,
        return_value_policy<copy_const_reference>()) 
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