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I need to check for a form input value to be a positive integer (not just an integer), and I noticed another snippet using the code below:

$i = $user_input_value;
if (!is_numeric($i) || $i < 1 || $i != round($i)) {
  return TRUE;
}

I was wondering if there's any advantage to using the three checks above, instead of just doing something like so:

$i = $user_input_value;
if (!is_int($i) && $i < 1) {
  return TRUE;
}
share|improve this question
    
the last check is only to see if the number is a integer. Using this check really depends on your requirements –  Ass3mbler Jan 30 '11 at 19:22
2  
...You are checking for a negative number in the code currently. –  JeroenEijkhof Jan 30 '11 at 19:26
    
Fixed! Sorry about that. –  geerlingguy Jan 30 '11 at 19:36

17 Answers 17

up vote 13 down vote accepted

the difference between your two code snippets is that is_numeric($i) also returns true if $i is a numeric string, but is_int($i) only returns true if $i is an integer and not if $i is an integer string. That is why you should use the first code snippet if you also want to return true if $i is an integer string (e.g. if $i == "19" and not $i == 19).

See these references for more information:

php is_numeric function

php is_int function

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Never thought of that... –  geerlingguy Jan 30 '11 at 19:34
1  
Just trying that code out, I am finding even that is not enough, since it validates ' 123' as an integer. I needed to add $i !== trim($i) to catch leading spaces. It seems that ' 123' == '123' even when you are sure the two values are strings, but PHP does not treat them as strings when comparing them that way. –  Jason Feb 17 '13 at 22:05

Not sure why there's no suggestion to use filter_var on this. I know it's an old thread, but maybe it will help someone out (after all, I ended up here, right?).

$filter_options = array( 
    'options' => array( 'min_range' => 0) 
);


if( filter_var( $i, FILTER_VALIDATE_INT, $filter_options ) !== FALSE) {
   ...
}

You could also add a maximum value as well.

$filter_options = array(
    'options' => array( 'min_range' => 0,
                        'max_range' => 100 )
);

http://php.net/manual/en/function.filter-var.php

http://www.php.net/manual/en/filter.filters.validate.php

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The other best way to check a Integer number is using regular expression. You can use the following code to check Integer value. It will false for float values.

if(preg_match('/^\d+$/',$i)) {
  // valid input.
} else {
  // invalid input.
}

It's better if you can check whether $i > 0 too.

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The best way for checking for positive integers when the variable can be INTEGER or STRING representing the integer:

 if ((is_int($value) || ctype_digit($value)) && (int)$value > 0 ) { // int }

is_int() will return true if the value type is integer. ctype_digit() will return true if the type is string but the value of the string is an integer.

The difference between this check and is_numeric() is that the is_numeric() will return true even for the values that represent number but are not in integers (e.g. "+0.123").

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Definition:

!A = !is_numeric($i)
B = $i < 1
!C = $i != round($i)

Then...

!is_numeric($i) || $i < 1 || $i != round($i) is equal to !A || B || !C

So:

!A || B || !C = !A || !C || B

Now, using the deMorgan theorem, i.e. (!A || !C) = (A && C), then:

!A || !C || B = (A && C) || B

Now, note that A && C = is_numeric($i) && $i == round($i), but if $i == round($i) is TRUE, then is_numeric($i) is TRUE as well, so we can simplify A && C = C so,

(A && C) || B = C || B =

$i == round($i) || $i < 1

So you just need to use:

$i = $user_input_value;
if ($i == round($i) || $i < 1) {
  return TRUE;
}
share|improve this answer

The first example is using round to verify that the input is an integer, and not a different numeric value (ie: a decimal).

is_int will return false if passed a string. See the PHP manual examples for is_int

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    preg_match('{^[0-9]*$}',$string))

and if you want to limit the length:

    preg_match('{^[0-9]{1,3}$}',$string)) //minimum of 1 max of 3

So pisitive int with a max length of 6:

    if(preg_match('{^[0-9]{1,6}$}',$string)) && $string >= 0)
share|improve this answer
    
does the preg_match allow negative int? –  SuperSpy Jan 30 '11 at 19:28
    
Another interesting approach... but this is harder to read, so I'd probably be less apt to use it. –  geerlingguy Jan 30 '11 at 22:44

You don't really need to use all three check and if you want a positive integer you might want to do the opposite of what is in your code:

if(is_numeric($i) && $i >= 0) { return true; }

Check Sören's answer for more information concerning the difference between is_int() and is_numeric()

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1  
also && not || –  Mchl Jan 30 '11 at 19:27
    
code catch :) changing it...thanks –  JeroenEijkhof Jan 30 '11 at 19:29
1  
i think that is probably not his problem, this rather was just a very basic example ;) –  Sören Jan 30 '11 at 19:30
    
you'r probably right :) –  JeroenEijkhof Jan 30 '11 at 19:34
    
Whoops! The problem of untested code... ;-) –  geerlingguy Jan 30 '11 at 19:34

In addition to all the other answers: You are probably looking for ctype_digit. It looks for a string containing only digits.

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All these answers overlook the fact that the requestor may checking form input.
The is_int() will fail because the form input is a string.
is_numeric() will be true also for float numbers.
That is why the $i == round($i) comes in as it checks for the input being a whole number.

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if ((int)$user_input_value){
 //It is an positive integer
}else{
 //it is not an positive integer or another type
}
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If you use "is_int" the variable must be integer, so it can't be a float value. (no round needed).

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if(isset($i) && is_int($i) && $i >= 0){ //0 is technically a postive integer I suppose
    return TRUE; //or FALSE I think in your case.
}
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To check for positive integer use:

$i = $user_input_value;
if (is_int($i) && $i > 0) {
  return true; //or any other instructions 
}

OR

$i = $user_input_value;
if (!is_int($i) || $i < 1) {
  return false; //or any other instructions 
}

Use the one that fits your purpose as they are the same. The following examples demonstrate the difference between is_numeric() and is_int():

is_numeric(0);     // returns true
is_numeric(7);     // returns true
is_numeric(-7);    // returns true
is_numeric(7.2);   // returns true
is_numeric("7");   // returns true
is_numeric("-7");  // returns true
is_numeric("7.2"); // returns true
is_numeric("abc"); // returns false

is_int(0);     // returns true
is_int(7);     // returns true
is_int(-7);    // returns true
is_int(7.2);   // returns false
is_int("7");   // returns false
is_int("-7");  // returns false
is_int("7.2"); // returns false
is_int("abc"); // returns false
share|improve this answer
    
is_int checks variable type. It is not applicable to user's input because in most cases it is string. –  Kirzilla Feb 4 at 13:27

Ok, I know this thread is really old but I share @Jeffrey Vdovjak's opinion: since I was able to find it, it might still help someone else out there.

php's gmp_sign() might be another easy way to check. It works for integer and numeric strings, and returns 1 if a is positive, -1 if a is negative, and 0 if a is zero.

So:

// positive
echo gmp_sign("500") . "\n";

// negative
echo gmp_sign("-500") . "\n";

// zero
echo gmp_sign("0") . "\n";

will output:

1
-1
0

See function manual at http://php.net/manual/en/function.gmp-sign.php

P.S. You'll need to have php_gmp.dll enabled in your .ini file.

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I would do something like this:

if ((int) $i > 0) {
    // this number is positive
}

The number gets typecast to a positive or negative number depending on the minus sign being at the front. Then compares the typecast number to being greater than 0 to determine if the number is positive.

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This's my solution, hope helpful :

if (is_numeric($i) && (intval($i) == floatval($i)) && intval($i) > 0)
   echo "positive integer";

i check if string is numeric, second check to sure it's integer and third to sure it positive

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