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I now have to remember how to create custom tag libraries, and since I'm using servlet 3.0 I decided to see the official JavaEE6 tutorial. Much to my surprise there is nothing about JSP in the JavaEE6 tutorial.

On the other hand, there's sufficient information in the JavaEE5 tutorial.

It seems JSF is now considered the only view technology in JavaEE, although I'm not aware of JSP being deprecated (q1: is it?).

I tried to search for a separate tutorial, but the site is a mess (I found a page about JSP, but it still says "Java 2 platform, enterprise edition".

So, q2: where is the official JSP tutorial for JavaEE6.

(I'll of course use the JavaEE5 tutorial, but it just seems weird)

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JSP is certainly not deprecated in Java EE 6. –  Jesper Jan 30 '11 at 20:40
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Folks, JSP has been deprecated: developer.com/java/web/article.php/3867851/… –  kvista Jan 30 '11 at 22:13
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@Kelly Vista - no. The links you provide simply say that JSF replaces JSP with Facelets as its default view. But this does not mean you can't use JSP alone (without any JSF). –  Bozho Jan 30 '11 at 22:28
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@Kelly Vista the point is it is deprecated for JSF. It is not as standalone. There is JSP without JSF. –  Bozho Jan 31 '11 at 8:04
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After doing more research, I found that Jave EE 6 actually does refer to JSP 2.2 (oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/tech/index-jsp-142185.html) and has old links, but you can find JSP 2.2's JSR at jcp.org/aboutJava/communityprocess/mrel/jsr245/index.html. Further, if you look at page 151 of the Java 6 EE spec (cds.sun.com/is-bin/INTERSHOP.enfinity/WFS/CDS-CDS_JCP-Site/…) they explicitly state that all implementations must support JSP. So my initial suspicion was wrong; however, guess no tutorial exists. –  kvista Jan 31 '11 at 13:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 51 down vote accepted

It seems JSF is now considered the only view technology in JavaEE, although I'm not aware of JSP being deprecated (q1: is it?).

JSF is not a view technology. JSF is a component based MVC framework. JSP as being a view technology is in Java EE 6 succeeded by Facelets. The Facelets introduction in Java EE 6 tutorial states the following:

JavaServer Pages (JSP) technology, previously used as the presentation technology for JavaServer Faces, does not support all the new features available in JavaServer Faces 2.0. JSP technology is considered to be a deprecated presentation technology for JavaServer Faces 2.0. Facelets is a part of the JavaServer Faces specification and also the preferred presentation technology for building JavaServer Faces technology-based applications.

It does indeed nowhere explicitly say that "pure" JSP at its whole own is deprecated for Java EE. Oracle is this way likely trying to push JSF forward. Which has admittedly its own advantages. Noted should be that Facelets can also be used as a standalone view technology in combination with other servlets than the FacesServlet, either homegrown or provided by a 3rd party request based MVC framework (only ones without the need for JSP taglibs). You can just map the FacesServlet on *.xhtml and basically just use alone the <ui:xxx> tags (instead of the <jsp:xxx> ones in legacy JSP) in combination with plain vanilla HTML like as you would do in JSP. You do not necessarily need the JSF core and html tags when working with Facelets.

I tried to search for a separate tutorial, but the site is a mess (I found a page about JSP, but it still says "Java 2 platform, enterprise edition". So, q2: where is the official JSP tutorial for JavaEE6.

There's none. Just grab the Java EE 5 one or even the J2EE 1.4 one. JSP has not changed that much anyway. There's basically nothing new in JSP 2.2 as compared to JSP 2.1. EL 2.2 has only one major change (the support for method arguments). The same story applies to JSP 2.1 as compared to JSP 2.0. The major changes were in EL only (the support for deferred EL, which is taken over from JSF 1.0/1.1).

You don't need to be shy when learning JSP by Java EE 5 tutorial, let alone by J2EE 1.4 tutorial. You should only not go further back to JSP 1.2 / J2EE 1.3 or before, that's when EL didn't exist in JSP. You don't want to have that :)

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I wrote "view technology" because JSF is used for the view part of MVC. Apart from that - yes, JavaEE5 is perfectly fine for learning JSP (although, to be honest, I didn't find it quite useful), but my concern is about people who will be learning these technologies now - they'd go to the latest tutorial, and not even be introduced to JSP. And JSP is used by many frameworks. –  Bozho Jan 31 '11 at 8:08
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The Java EE 5 tutorial is indeed a boring read. Do you have Head First Servlets & JSP or Core Servlets and JSP at hands? Both are a more pleasant read and should include custom JSP taglib sections as well. –  BalusC Jan 31 '11 at 11:08
    
@BalusC - I already managed to achieve my task, but had to use my memories and common-sense :) –  Bozho Jan 31 '11 at 13:31
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Great. You're welcome. I must however admit that I was also surprised to see that JSP (and JSTL and custom tags) is missing in JEE6 tutorial. I however already discovered that one year ago shortly after it was released (I however never thought about posting it as a question here; it's a good one, it must have been asked at least once so that we can refer to it :) ). All JSP/JSTL/taglib tutorial links in my answers whenever necessary also point to the JEE5 one. Only EL is still in JEE6 tutorial. –  BalusC Jan 31 '11 at 13:38
    
As you said, JSF is a component inside MVC framework where JSP and Facelet is the view technology to implement the UI. Does this correct interpretation ? –  peterwkc Mar 7 '11 at 7:27

I was just thinking of learning JSPs, but then came across this post. So I did my own digging. A line from Java EE 6 says it all:

"Facelets technology, available as part of JavaServer Faces 2.0, is now the preferred presentation technology for building JavaServer Faces technology-based web applications."

In my humble opinion, if someone is planning to learn or implement from scratch, then it's better to go with JSF than JSPs.

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As stated above, JSF - is framework and JSP is technology, it means that you cannot compare JSP with JSF. So JSF is not itself a substitution for JSP. –  shevchik Feb 20 '13 at 11:26

It seems JSF is now considered the only view technology in JavaEE, although I'm not aware of JSP being deprecated (q1: is it?).

From new Java EE 7 Tutorial (June 2013) we can find out that JavaServer Faces technology is exactly a user interface framework for constructing web applications. On page 1-18 we can also find the following statement:

The Java EE 7 platform requires JavaServer Pages 2.3 for compatibility with earlier releases, but recommends the use of Facelets as the display technology in new applications.

It means, that JSP is not yet deprecated, but only unrecommended. We should also take into consideration, that JavaServer Faces technology APIs are layered directly on top of the Servlet API, and from this reason it can became a substitute for JSP. The following image illustrates this situation.

Java Web Application Technologies - Java EE 7 Tutorial

So, q2: where is the official JSP tutorial for JavaEE6?

As we can read in Java EE 7 Tutorial (June 2013, page 1-18):

For information about JSP technology, see the The Java EE 5 Tutorial at http://docs.oracle.com/javaee/5/tutorial/doc/.

the only one offical manual for this technology is The Java EE 5 Tutorial.

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