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I have a directory that has about 100 subfolders and close to 2,000 files within those subfolders (up to 4 layers). The files are .txt or .log, and each extension has a unique file name. I need to move or copy (whichever is faster) the files to the root of a different folder without recreating the subfolder structure like xcopy does. This is on Windows xp

Thanks in advance.

Existing:

Dir1\Folder1\000111.txt
Dir1\Folder2\000112.txt
Dir1\Folder3\000113.log
Dir1\Folder4\Dir2\000114.txt
Dir1\Folder4\Dir2\000115.txt
Dir1\Folder4\Dir2\000116.log
Dir1\Folder5\Dir3\000117.log
Dir1\Folder5\Dir3\000118.txt
Dir1\Folder5\Dir3\Dir4\000119.txt
Dir1\Folder5\Dir3\Dir4\000120.txt
Dir1\Folder5\Dir3\Dir4\000120.log
Required:
Dir9\000111.txt
Dir9\000112.txt
Dir9\000113.log
Dir9\000114.txt
Dir9\000115.txt
Dir9\000116.log
Dir9\000117.log
Dir9\000118.txt
Dir9\000119.txt
Dir9\000120.txt
Dir9\000120.log

share|improve this question
    
You need to do it like XCOPY? Why not just use XCOPY? –  Gabe Jan 30 '11 at 19:49
    
i just tried with xcopy but it als copied the directory structures . That is not what i want . –  ovgu12 Jan 30 '11 at 19:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

How about something like:

for /R %f in (*.txt,*.log) do copy %f dir9\%~nf

Issue this with dir1 as your working directory.

Have a read of for /? to understand why this works.

When I work on for statements I tend to try them out first like so:

for /R %f in (*.txt,*.log) do @echo copy %f dir9\%~nf
share|improve this answer
    
what should i replace "dir1" asl input ? –  ovgu12 Jan 30 '11 at 20:10
    
@Micro just change directory to the root of the tree you want to work on –  David Heffernan Jan 30 '11 at 20:12
    
thanx it works now –  ovgu12 Jan 30 '11 at 20:14
    
@Micro You're welcome; for is really useful! –  David Heffernan Jan 30 '11 at 20:18
    
Whee an answer about doing something with files that uses for and doesn't do for /f over dir. That alone is worth a +1 :-) –  Joey Jan 30 '11 at 23:27

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