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I want to create a sorting system, it gets some numbers and sort it DESC.

if I enter 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 (orderly), that code works fine .. but if enter that numbers, disorderly, it is broken down ..

my code is::

#include <iostream.h>
main () {
 int a[10], max, temp;
 for (int i=0; i<10; i++) {
    cout << "Enter number " << i+1 << ": ";
    cin >> a[i];
 }

 for (int j=0; j<10; j++) {
  for (int x=0; x<=j; x++) {
    if (a[j] > a[j+1]) {
     temp = a[j];
     a[j] = a[j+1];
     a[j+1] = temp;
    }
  }
 }

 cout << "Sort [DESC]: \n";
 for (int w=9; w>=0; w--) {
    cout << w << ". " << a[w] << "\n";
 }
 //cout << "Max: " << max;
}

Thanks a lot...

share|improve this question
    
Looks like a traditional bubble sort from here. –  Brad Christie Jan 30 '11 at 20:03
2  
It's int main(). The implicit int is no longer valid in C++. –  Billy ONeal Jan 30 '11 at 20:05
1  
This looks very homework-ish. If so we should tag it as such... –  Andrew White Jan 30 '11 at 20:05
3  
Use <iostream>. There is no <iostream.h> in the C++ standard and never was. –  Axel Gneiting Jan 30 '11 at 20:12
1  
Am I the only one who finds it very amusing that this algorithm only works for the expected output? –  the_drow Jan 30 '11 at 20:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're accessing a[10] (through a[j+1]), which surely can't be correct. Naive bubble sort would usually look like this, for instance:

for(int i = NUMBER_OF_ELEMENTS - 1; i > 0; --i)
for(int t = 0; t < i; ++t)
{
    if(item [t] greater than [t+1])
    {
        swap item [t] with [t+1]
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Don't understand why > 0 is your comparison -- typically it would be either comparing the left element with the right element, or it would be a strcmp style comparison function in which case you need != 0 not > 0. –  Billy ONeal Jan 30 '11 at 20:14
    
@Billy: Changed that, it was just an example. In case of integers, it would be item[t] > item[t+1], for strings it would be strcmp(item[t], item[t+1]) > 0, and so on. –  AndiDog Jan 30 '11 at 20:18
    
Fair enough. +1. –  Billy ONeal Jan 30 '11 at 20:20

I want to create a sorting system

Already done for you as part of the standard library:

http://codepad.org/VBAB0JBo

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

void PrintNumbers(int * myArray)
{
    std::copy(myArray, myArray + 10, std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, ","));
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    int myArray[10] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10};
    //Sort ascending
    std::sort(myArray, myArray + 10);
    PrintNumbers(myArray);
    //Sort descending
    std::sort(myArray, myArray + 10, std::greater<int>());
    PrintNumbers(myArray);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

if you are using C++ you can use STL std::vector instead of array and then use STL algorithm std::sort

share|improve this answer
4  
std::sort is good advice. However, given that the array is stack allocated it's perfectly fine -- no reason to use a vector here. –  Billy ONeal Jan 30 '11 at 20:10

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