Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a decimal multiplier in C++. The multiplier is implemented by taking two integers represented as vectors of digits. Each vector stores its digits in reverse order, for easier representation by powers of ten. For example, 3497 = 3 * 10^3 + 4 * 10^2 + 9 * 10^1 + 7 *10^0 and is stored in a vector as {7, 9, 4, 3}. Thus, each index of the vector represents that digit's respective power of ten in the integer.

However, I'm having some bugs in my multiplication. 1-digit x 1-digit and 2-digit x 1-digit multiplication work perfectly, but it breaks down at 2-digit x 2-digit. I'm fairly certain that fixing this bug would fix all the other bugs with n-digit x m-digit. My code for both my multiplication and addition methods are below.

vector<int> multiply(vector<int> &a, vector<int> &b) {
    // check for emptiness
    if(a.size() == 0)
        return b;
    else if(b.size() == 0)
        return a;

    unsigned int i; // increment counter

    // compensate for size differences
    if(a.size() > b.size())
        for(i = 0; i < a.size()-b.size(); ++i)
            b.push_back(0);
    else
        for(i = 0; i < b.size()-a.size(); ++i)
            a.push_back(0);

    int c = 0; // carry value
    int temp; // temporary integer
    vector<int> p; // product vector
    vector<int> s; // sum vector
    s.push_back(0); // initialize to 0

    // multiply each digit of a by an index of b
    for(i = 0; i < b.size(); ++i) {
        // skip digits of 0
        if(b[i] == 0)
            continue;

        p.resize(i,0); // resize p and add 0s

        // multiply b[i] by each digit of a
        for(unsigned int j = 0; j < a.size(); ++j) {
            temp = c + b[i] * a[j]; // calculate temporary value

            // two cases
            if(temp > 9) {
                c = temp / 10; // new carry
                p.push_back(temp % 10);
            }
            else {
                c = 0;
                p.push_back(temp);
            }
        }

        // append carry if relevant
        if(c != 0)
            p.push_back(c);

        // sum p and s
        s = add(p, s);
        p.clear(); // empty p
    }

    return s; // return summed vector (total product)
}

vector<int> add(vector<int> &a, vector<int> &b) {
    // check for emptiness
    if(a.size() == 0)
        return b;
    else if(b.size() == 0)
        return a;

    unsigned int i; // increment counter

    // compensate size differences
    if(a.size() > b.size())
        for(i = 0; i < a.size()-b.size(); ++i)
            b.push_back(0);
    else
        for(i = 0; i < b.size()-a.size(); ++i)
            a.push_back(0);

    int c = 0; // carry value
    vector<int> s; // sum vector
    int temp; // temporary value

    // iterate through decimal vectors
    for(i = 0; i < a.size(); ++i) {
        temp = c + a[i] + b[i]; // sum three terms

        // two cases
        if(temp > 9) {
            c = temp / 10; // new carry
            s.push_back(temp % 10); // push back remainder
        }
        else {
            c = 0;
            s.push_back(temp);
        }
    }

    // append carry if relevant
    if(c != 0)
        s.push_back(c);

    return s; // return sum
}

A few test cases:

45 * 16 returns 740 (should be 720) 34 * 18 returns 542 (should be 532) 67 * 29 returns 2003 (should be 1943) 28 * 12 returns 336 (correct)

The only problem I could think of would be an issue with the carries, but everything seems to check out as I walk through the code. Can anyone see the error? Or am I taking the wrong approach to this entirely?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried stepping through the code in a debugger ? –  Paul R Jan 30 '11 at 20:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're not clearing out the carry before (or after) the inner loop.

    // iterate through decimal vectors
    for(i = 0; i < a.size(); ++i) {
        ...
    }

    // append carry if relevant
    if(c != 0) {
        p.push_back(c);
        // add this line
        c=0;
    }

Also, in add you probably want:

// compensate size differences
while (a.size() > b.size())
    b.push_back(0);
while (b.size() > a.size())
    a.push_back(0);

As-is, you'll only be pushing a number of zeroes equal to (I believe) half of the initial difference between the arrays. Try an interactive debugger (as James suggests) and you may turn up other bugs (though there's also something to be said for running code as short as this by hand).

share|improve this answer
    
You beat me to it. :) –  Bill Jan 30 '11 at 20:55
    
Thanks, that did the trick. Can't believe I missed that. –  James Jan 30 '11 at 21:07

Some additional style comments:

  1. Don't test for empty vectors and then return what you're returning, because the presence of an empty vector indicates a programming error somewhere else - either raise an exception, or (probably better) use an assertion. Unless, of course, you're using empty vectors to represent 0 - in which case the logic is still wrong; 0 * something = 0, not something.

  2. When you test a vector for emptiness, use .empty().

  3. There should be no need to pad the vectors to the same length with zeroes. You aren't considering elements pairwise; you're taking each multiplied with each other one. And did you notice how currently you might pad b with zeroes, but then you have logic that skips those zeroes completely inside the loop?

  4. But the padding could be done more neatly anyway:

    size_t len = std::max(a.size(), b.size());
    a.resize(len); b.resize(len); // Note that 0 is the default "fill"
    
  5. Special cases aren't special enough. Your logic for handling the case where temp > 9 would work perfectly well when temp <= 9 too. Don't prematurely optimize. Keep code simple. (The performance that you gain by avoiding div/mod work could very easily be lost by adding the branching, on modern processors.)

  6. Don't "reuse" a vector by repeatedly clearing and resizing it. Instead, construct it inside that scope (again, don't prematurely optimize). In general, restrict variable scopes as much as possible. Similar comments apply for other variables. Especially for loop counters (ugh).

  7. But do cache things like the size of a vector that's iterated over (when that size is constant). That's harder for the compiler to optimize.

  8. Better yet, use iterators to iterate over a vector when the indices aren't needed.

  9. The input vectors won't change, so advertise that.

  10. Use full names where there is a reasonable full-length name.

  11. You really don't need to comment that much. It's quite clear what's going on.

  12. The kind of running-total you're doing ('accumulation') is a good candidate (one of few good reasons) to make use of a non-const reference.

I would write (not considering significant changes to the algorithm) (warning, not tested!):

// I give the function a noun-type name because it returns a value. Just a convention.
vector<int> product(const vector<int> &a, const vector<int> &b) {
    assert !a.empty();
    assert !b.empty();

    vector<int> result(1); // initialized to hold 1 digit with value 0.

    vector<int>::const_iterator a_begin = b.begin(), a_end = b.end();
    size_t b_len = b.size();

    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < b_len; ++i) {
        vector<int> row(i);
        int carry = 0; // notice that proper scoping auto-fixes the bug.

        for (vector<int>::const_iterator it = a_begin; it != a_end; ++it) {
            int value = carry + b[i] * *it;
            carry = value / 10;
            row.push_back(value % 10);
        }
        if (carry != 0) value.push_back(carry);
        add(result, row);
    }
    return result;
}

// Similarly, if I were to return the sum, I would call this 'sum'.
void add(vector<int> &target, const vector<int> &to_add) {
    assert !target.empty();
    assert !to_add.empty();

    int count = to_add.size();

    // Make sure 'target' is long enough
    target.resize(std::max(target.size(), count));
    int size = target.size(); // after resizing.

    int carry = 0;

    // iterate through decimal vectors
    for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
        int value = carry + target[i];
        if (i < count) { value += to_add[i]; }
        carry = value / 10;
        target[i] = value % 10;
    }

    if (carry != 0) { target.push_back(carry); }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.