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I don't know what's wrong with it.. I can't find where the error is, commenting out the implementation doesn't resolve the error either.

Header File

#ifndef MAIN_SAVITCH_SEQUENCE_H
#define MAIN_SAVITCH_SEQUENCE_H
#include <cstdlib>  // Provides size_t

namespace main_savitch_3
{
    class sequence
    {
    public:
        // TYPEDEFS and MEMBER CONSTANTS
        typedef double value_type;
        typedef std::size_t size_type;
        static const size_type CAPACITY = 30;
        // CONSTRUCTOR
        sequence( );
        // MODIFICATION MEMBER FUNCTIONS
        void start( );
        void advance( );
        void insert(const value_type& entry);
        void attach(const value_type& entry);
        void remove_current( );
        // CONSTANT MEMBER FUNCTIONS
        size_type size( ) const;
        bool is_item( ) const;
        value_type current( ) const;
    private:
        value_type data[CAPACITY];
        size_type used;
        size_type current_index;
    };
}

#endif

Source

#include "sequence1.h"
#include <assert.h>

namespace main_savitch_3
{

    // Default constructer - sequence is empty
    sequence::sequence()
    {
        used = current_index = 0;
    }


    // Start the iteration
    void sequence::start()
    {
        current_index = 0;
    }
    // Iterate
    void sequence::advance()
    {
        current_index++;
    }


    // Number of items in the sequence
    sequence::size_type sequence::size() const
    {
        return used;
    }
    // Checks if there is a current item
    bool sequence::is_item() const
    {
        return current_index <= used && used > 0;
    }
    // Returns the current value
    sequence::value_type sequence::current() const
    {
        assert(is_item()); // no current item
        return data[current_index];
    }


    // Adds an item BEFORE the current index
    void sequence::insert(const value_type& entry)
    {
        assert(entry != 0); // pointer is invalid
        assert(current_index < sequence::CAPACITY); // no room to add an item

        // move items up - starting with the last item and working down to the current item
        // arrays start at 0, so the -1 adjusts it
        for (size_type i = used - 1; i >= current_index; i--)
            data[i + 1] = data[i];

        data[current_index] = entry;
    }
    // Adds an item AFTER the current index
    void sequence::attach(const value_type& entry)
    {
        assert(entry != 0); // pointer is invalid
        assert(current_index < sequence::CAPACITY); // no room to add an item

        // move items up - starting with the last item and working down to the current item
        // arrays start at 0, so the -1 adjusts it
        for (size_type i = used - 1; i > current_index; i--)
            data[i + 1] = data[i];

        if (current_index = 0)
            data[used] = entry;
        else
            data[current_index + 1] = entry;
    }
    // Removes the current item
    void sequence::remove_current()
    {
        for (size_type i = current_index; i < used; i++)
            data[i] = data[i + 1];
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
This is a link error. It looks like you're trying to build an executable without a main() function ? You should either be building a library, or else you need a source file with a main() in it. –  Paul R Jan 30 '11 at 20:46
    
Nitpick: If you want size_t, you should use <cstddef> rather than <cstdlib>. –  Billy ONeal Jan 30 '11 at 20:51
    
@Billy: size_t is defined in both headers. –  James McNellis Jan 30 '11 at 20:54
    
I have a main function in another file, it is a test program provided by the textbook. int main() {...} I don't know what I have to do to make the program recognize it –  Caleb Jares Jan 30 '11 at 22:20
    
@James: Yes, but <cstddef> is "smaller" :) –  Billy ONeal Jan 31 '11 at 1:28

8 Answers 8

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Even if your project has a main() method, the linker sometimes gets confused. You can solve this issue in Visual Studio 2010 by going to

Project -> Properties -> Configuration Properties -> Linker -> System

and changing SubSystem to Console.

share|improve this answer
4  
SubSystem was already set to Console for me and I have a main() function present. Do you have any other idea? –  rfcoder89 Mar 5 '13 at 14:42
    
Try Cleaning and Rebuilding your solution. –  Caleb Jares Mar 5 '13 at 19:17
4  
Thanks, the problem was that I had the main func inside a namespace lol. –  rfcoder89 Mar 6 '13 at 12:36
5  
I had the exact opposite (Console set instead of Windows), so I switched and it worked. Your solution helped me anyway to get on the right track. Thanks ! –  Vahron Apr 2 '13 at 15:30
1  
I just solved similar error by changing console into windows :) –  LCFactorization May 23 at 2:08

if you have _tmain function in your projects you need to include <tchar.h>.

share|improve this answer
    
I have a main function in another file, it is a test program provided by the textbook. int main() {...} I don't know what I have to do to make the program recognize it –  Caleb Jares Jan 30 '11 at 22:24

You need a main() function so the program knows where to start.

share|improve this answer
    
I have a main function in another file, it is a test program provided by the textbook. int main() {...} I don't know what I have to do to make the program recognize it –  Caleb Jares Jan 30 '11 at 22:14
    
Now compile and build the two source files i.e, g++ main.cpp sequence1.cpp -o result.out –  Mahesh Jan 30 '11 at 22:33
1  
@cable729: Have you added both .cpp files to the same project in Visual Studio? –  James McNellis Jan 30 '11 at 23:03
2  
I figured it out, in the project properties, under Linker, it was set to Windows, instead of Console. Thanks for the help –  Caleb Jares Jan 30 '11 at 23:28
1  
@cable729: The main function that is the entry point of the program must be in the global namespace. You cannot put it in any other namespace and you cannot use a using directive to bring some other main function into the global namespace. –  James McNellis Feb 2 '11 at 22:06

Did you implement the main() function?

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    ... code ...
    return 0;
}

[edit]

You have your main() in another source file so you've probably forgotten to add it to your project.

To add an existing source file: In Solution Explorer, right-click the Source Files folder, point to Add, and then click Existing Item. Now select the source file containing the main()

share|improve this answer
    
I have a main function in another file, it is a test program provided by the textbook. int main() {...} I don't know what I have to do to make the program recognize it –  Caleb Jares Jan 30 '11 at 22:21
    
@cable729 You probably use Visual C++. Then you should add the file with the main() to the project's list of source files. Another option is to copy and paste your main() to your sequence1.cpp. –  ssmir Jan 30 '11 at 22:50
    
@cable729 I've updated my answer –  ssmir Jan 30 '11 at 23:14

In case someone missed the obvious; note that if you build a GUI application and use
"-subsystem:windows" in the link-args, the application entry is WinMain@16. Not main(). Hence you can use this snippet to call your main():

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <windows.h>

#ifdef __GNUC__
#define _stdcall  __attribute__((stdcall))
#endif

int _stdcall
WinMain (struct HINSTANCE__ *hInstance,
         struct HINSTANCE__ *hPrevInstance,
         char               *lpszCmdLine,
         int                 nCmdShow)
{
  return main (__argc, __argv);
}

share|improve this answer

You appear to have no main function, which is supposed to be the entry-point for your program.

share|improve this answer
    
I have a main function in another file, it is a test program provided by the textbook. int main() {...} I don't know what I have to do to make the program recognize it –  Caleb Jares Jan 30 '11 at 22:23

I had this problem despite:

  • having a main(); and
  • configuring all other projects in my solution to be static libraries.

My eventual fix was the following:

  • my main() was in a namespace, so was effectively called something::main() ...removing this namespace fixed the problem.
share|improve this answer

go to "Project-Properties-Configuration Properties-Linker-input-Additional dependencies" then go to the end and type ";ws2_32.lib".

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