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I'm trying to implement a "subcommand" system as an inheritable class in Python. My expected use case is something like:

from command import Command
import sys

class MyCommand(Command):
    @Command.subcommand
    def foo(self):
        print "this can be run as a subcommand"

    def bar(self):
        print "but this is a plain method and isn't exposed to the CLI"

MyCommand()(*sys.argv)

# at the command line, the user runs "mycommand.py foo"

I implemented Command.subcommand as a static method and everything worked fine until I tried to add a subcommand to the parent class, which got me TypeError: 'staticmethod' object is not callable. In hindsight, it's obvious that this won't work:

class Command(object):
    @staticmethod
    def subcommand(method):
        method.is_subcommand = True

        return method

    @subcommand
    def common(self):
        print "this subcommand is available to all child classes"

The only alternative I've found so far is to declare the subcommand decorator outside the parent class, then inject it after the class definition is complete.

def subcommand(method):
    method.is_subcommand = True

    return method

class Command(object):
    @subcommand
    def common(self):
        print "this subcommand is available to all child classes"

Command.subcommand = staticmethod(subcommand)
del subcommand

However, as someone who never used Python before decorators were added, this feels very clunky to me. Is there a more elegant way to accomplish this?

share|improve this question
    
Well, first question is why you implement a decorator as a method on a class, unless that class is used for a bunch of decorators. And if that's what its for, why are you decorating the decorator "common"? It feels clunky probably because your class design is a bit weird... :) – Lennart Regebro Jan 30 '11 at 21:43
    
What exactly are you hoping this decorator will accomplish for you? Python already knows what the subcommands are, because it knows what classes are subclasses of others. – Karl Knechtel Jan 30 '11 at 21:56
    
@Lennart — Purely for the import aesthetics. I wasn't a fan of import command ... class MyCommand(command.Command) (feels redundant) or from command import * ... @subcommand (feels like its polluting the namespace). – Ben Blank Jan 30 '11 at 22:23
    
@Karl — The decorator essentially flags specific methods as entry points, which are then exposed to the command line. – Ben Blank Jan 30 '11 at 22:24
    
What's wrong with just exposing free functions to the command line? What is the Command class hierarchy doing for you? OO isn't just about classes you know – Karl Knechtel Jan 30 '11 at 22:46
up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are two solutions to this problem that I can think of. The simplest is to make it a static method after you're done using it in the parent class:

class Command(object):
    def subcommand(method): # Regular function in class definition scope.
        method.is_subcommand = True

        return method

    @subcommand
    def common(self):
        print "this subcommand is available to all child classes"

    subcommand = staticmethod(subcommand)
    # Now a static method. Can no longer be called during class definition phase.

This is somewhat fragile in that you can't use it in the parent class after you make it a static method. The more robust way to do this is to add an intermediate class:

class Command(object):
    @staticmethod
    def subcommand(method):
        method.is_subcommand = True

        return method

class CommandBase(Command):

    @Command.subcommand
    def common(self):
        print "this subcommand is available to all child classes"

You can now inherit all of your classes from CommandBase instead of Command.

share|improve this answer
    
This is sort of surprising. I would have thought that when executing decorators of class methods the class itself wasn't existing yet (the metaclass is called at the end), but still subcommand is found. Anyway both your examples have typos: missing end quote in first and probably you meant @Command.subcommand in second. Am I correct? – 6502 Jan 30 '11 at 21:54
    
@6502 I've fixed the typos. If you look at the definition of subcommand in the first example, you'll see that it's defined as a regular function. All of the method definitions take place in the scope in which subcommand is found so it's to be expected that subcommand is visible in that scope. – aaronasterling Jan 30 '11 at 21:58
    
Yes it makes sense... subcommand is just a local variable until the end of the body of the class, at that point the dictionary is built and sent to metaclass. Still I feel strange writing e.g. a while loop in the body of a class statement :-D ... – 6502 Jan 30 '11 at 22:10
    
— Your second suggestion is interesting. Currently, I'm conflating the functionality of the base class (the default subcommands) and the subcommand feature itself. If I move just the subcommand methods (__call__ and subcommand) into a dedicated class, I think it will be quite elegant. Thank you! – Ben Blank Jan 30 '11 at 22:30

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