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I recently had a homework question where we were supposed to work with a chess board, and place a number of queens on the board.

The question was trivial in terms of difficulty, but what I wanted to ask was this:

Should I just make a boolean 2-D array and change every position that contains a queen to 1 or should I make a private class to represent a queen, that has x and y coordinates as instance variables?

This might not seem very important or pressing, but I'm using Java and it kinda gets to the core of the concept of OO programming. If we never use the modular capabilities of Java, then why use Java at all? We might as well have written the same thing in C or Python.

Which would be more appropriate in general do you think? I would appreciate it if you could restrict your answers to ones that are backed by reason, as opposed to opinions or personal preferences.

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This is nothing to do with ethics. –  Stephen C Jan 30 '11 at 21:49
    
@Stephen What would you say it should be classified as then? –  efficiencyIsBliss Jan 30 '11 at 21:50
    
I think it is a question about proper datastructure design, or about programming style. –  sleske Jan 30 '11 at 22:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Should I just make a boolean 2-D array and change every position that contains a queen to 1 or should I make a private class to represent a queen, that has x and y coordinates as instance variables?

There is no single general answer to such questions. Either one can be suitable in specific situations, solving specific problems.

If we never use the modular capabilities of Java, then why use Java at all? We might as well have written the same thing in C or Python.

The fact that Java is an OO language does not mean we must define and use classes and objects for every piece of data we need to represent.

If I understand your question correctly, you are asking about an implementation detail. Object oriented programming is not so much concerned about the specific implementation details as it is concerned about encapsulating those implementation details behind a suitable interface which represents some important domain concept well. Hence clients of the class need not know nor think about its implementation details, only about the higher level abstraction represented by an interface.

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I agree that there is no set requirement, but I was wondering which would be more appropriate if either. I came across a similar situation while implementing a tree based data structure, about whether to make a private class for representing the tree or just one class that did everything (hold the definition of the tree and the methods to carry out ops on the tree). –  efficiencyIsBliss Jan 30 '11 at 21:58
    
Also, given that it's a homework question, I'm guessing the lecturers don't want to teach the best-suited language for each different homework assignment (because then they'd never get anything done). (This also prepares you for the real world where you are often left implementing something in a language that is far from the ideal language for the task.) –  Catchwa Jan 30 '11 at 21:58
    
@efficiency, it really depends on the algorithm you use, any specific time/space performance requirements etc. Without such details the question can not be answered. –  Péter Török Jan 30 '11 at 22:02

Should I just make a boolean 2-D array and change every position that contains a queen to 1 or should I make a private class to represent a queen, that has x and y coordinates as instance variables?

It depends on your needs. If, for example, you need to iterate over board and check each square in order to define if there is a queen I would pick the first approach, but if you have only two or three queens and make decisions depending on their mutual disposition storing coordinates as a field of a class Queen would be a better idea as for me.

This might not seem very important or pressing, but I'm using Java and it kinda gets to the core of the concept of OO programming. If we never use the modular capabilities of Java, then why use Java at all? We might as well have written the same thing in C or Python.

Having the ability to use OOP does not imply that it's always the best solution, sometimes creating a separate class instead of using primitive types will just complicate things and make your code harder to support.

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You made a lot of valid points, therefore the upvote. Peter got there first, so I marked his answer as correct. –  efficiencyIsBliss Jan 30 '11 at 22:10

In this case having a 2D array of Queens (separate class but without containing x,y coordinates) or booleans (indicating either a presence or absence of a queen) should be the correct choice. The reasoning is as follows:

  • Queens as such do not have a position. You should design your objects (POJOs) independently of where they will be used and include as class members only properties that are relevant to them on their own.
  • The positioning data has nothing to do with the queens and should be separated from them. Put in simpler terms, it is not a queens' job to take care of her position, but rather that of an external party (player, program, whatever). This is called separation of responsibilities.
  • Most algorithms that you would like to use will be more difficult to implement and very hard to read and follow logically. Simple iterations of the board would be made impossible (or useless, at the least).

You will have to clearly define the role of each object in your system in order to be able to design it in a way that's both extensible & easy to work with. Not having a good idea of what exactly each object will be doing might lead to a wrong decision somewhere along the path, which itself will lead to more bad decisions down the road that deal with it until it becomes so bloated with hacks and workarounds that you would decide to start over :)

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"Queens as such do not have a position." To me this seems to be your own personal view, rather than a fact (of course, no problem with personal views, just let's not mix opinions and facts :-). We are free to model objects the way we want (of course, with consequences). In fact, if your queen object does not have a position, what state it actually has? And if it does not take care of its position, what responsibility it actually has? –  Péter Török Jan 30 '11 at 22:11
    
Well, that was kind of my point - it does not have to have any responsibility at all, aside from being a valid reference to a unique object in memory. If the problem domain requires it, it could also be stateless, but provided only for readability - having a Queen[][] speaks tons more than having a boolean[][] board. I do agree this might be a personal opinion, but take for instance the MapEntry class - it does have a state (key + value) but in no way is it responsible for its actual position within the map. –  pnt Jan 30 '11 at 23:06

I know you don't want an opinion but I'm going to give you one anyway: there is no general case. The art of software design lies in being able to make the appropriate choice in data and code structure depending on the specifics of the application. OO languages give you a more expressive palette to design with, but there are no hard and fast rules that apply in every situation.

So, that's the opinion. Now, to your specific example. A question I might ask myself is: What's more useful? An individual piece knowing where it is on the board, or the board knowing where each piece is? If you don't have a separate notion of a board, i.e. in the form of a 2D array that contains pieces, then you're going to have to ask every piece where it is everytime you need to do something with a piece. This is perhaps fine if you only have a couple of pieces, but it gets inefficient the more pieces you have.

Conversely if, let's say, you have a very large chessboard - 500x500 - and only a couple of pieces on it, then a 2D array would be very inefficient, so a sparse data structure would likely be better.

Another way to look at it: if you have more the one piece then they're going to be held in a data structure of some kind, perhaps an array, or a 2D array, or a linked list, or an array of linked lists, or whatever. What data structure are you going to choose, and why?

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Thanks for the question specific considerations. Made things easier for this particular case. –  efficiencyIsBliss Jan 30 '11 at 22:12

You could adequately represent the state of the board using either of the methods you have described. The most appropriate method to use will depend on the desired behavior of the system, which we haven't been told.

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Should I just make a boolean 2-D array and change every position that contains a queen to 1 or should I make a private class to represent a queen, that has x and y coordinates as instance variables?

This is really two questions:

  1. Should I store the queens' positions inside a single 2D array, or should I store the x/y coordinates for each queen?
  2. Should I use a simple datastructure, or a class to hold this data?

The answer to 1. is, as pointed out by the other answers: It depends. Use the data structure that is easiest for the algorithms you need.

The answer to 2. is: Yes, I would always wrap the data structure (whichever you use, the list of coordinates or the array) in a class. Even if the class may sound trivial, if you use a class, it will be immediately apparent that you are storing positions. If you just use a 2D array, people will have to wonder what it does. Plus, you can have suitable methods in the class, enforce invariants (e.g. <10 queens) etc. ... all the OO goodness :-).

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