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I have a set of classes with a complex initialization scheme. Basically, I start with the interface I need to get a hold of, and then make a bunch of calls, and I end up with an object that implements that interface.

In order to handle this, I made a factory class that can, given an interface, produce the final object. I made this factory into a bean, and in XML I specified my various service beans as being instantiated via this factory object with a parameter of the interface that they will implement.

This works great, and I totally get exactly the beans I need. Unfortunately, I would like to access them from my controller classes, which are discovered via component scanning. I use @Autowired here, and it appears that Spring has no idea what type of object these are, and since @Autowired works by type, I'm SOL.

Using @Resource(name="beanName") here would work perfectly, however it seems odd to use @Resource for some beans and @Autowired for others.

Is there a way to get Spring to know what interface the factory will be creating for each of these beans without having a different factory method for each type?

I'm using Spring 2.5.6, by the way, otherwise I'd just JavaConfig the whole thing and forget about it.

Factory class:

<T extends Client> T buildService(Class<T> clientClass) {
  //Do lots of stuff with client class and return an object of clientClass.
}

app context:

<bean id="serviceFactoryBean" class="com.captainAwesomePants.FancyFactory" />
<bean id="userService" factory-bean="serviceFactoryBean" factory-method="buildService">
   <constructor-arg value="com.captain.services.UserServiceInterface" />
</bean>
<bean id="scoreService" factory-bean="serviceFactoryBean" factory-method="buildService">
   <constructor-arg value="com.captain.services.ScoreServiceInterface" />
</bean>  

my controller:

public class HomepageController {

   //This doesn't work
   @Autowired @Qualifier("userService") UserServiceInterface userService;

   //This does
   @Resource(name="scoreService") ScoreServiceInterface scoreService;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I suggest you take the factory pattern one step further and implement your factories as Spring FactoryBean classes. The FactoryBean interface has a getObjectType() method which the contain calls to discover what type the factory will return. This gives your autowiring something to get its teeth into, as long as your factory returns a sensible value.

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I like it. I was leaning away from FactoryBeans at first, but honestly it appears that they will do exactly what I want them to do. –  Brandon Yarbrough Jan 31 '11 at 10:20
    
@CaptainAwesomePants: I tend to keep my FactoryBean implementations as thin as possible, having them delegate to another class which doesn't use the Spring API. You could do the same - just delegate to your existing serviceFactoryBean. –  skaffman Jan 31 '11 at 10:22
    
@skaffman: So in this case there should be as many FactoryBean implementations as number of return types variations. Will Spring perform the correct type discovery if two additional methods are added to factory UserServiceInterface buildUserService() { return buildService(UserServiceInterface.class); } and ScoreServiceInterface buildScoreService() { return buildService(ScoreServiceInterface.class); } (and context is re-tuned to use them) ? –  dma_k Nov 29 '11 at 9:53
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I had a similar problem, but for me I wanted to use a single factory for creating mocked-out implementations of my auto-wired dependencies using JMockit (the testing framework that I am required to use).

After finding no satisfactory solution on the interwebs, I threw together a simple solution that is working really well for me.

My solution uses a Spring FactoryBean as well, but it only uses a single factory bean for creating all my beans (which the original asker seems to have wished to do).

My solution was to implement a factory-of-factories meta-factory that serves-up FactoryBean wrappers around the real, single factory.

Here is the Java for my JMockit mock bean factory:

public class MockBeanFactory<C> implements FactoryBean<C> {

    private Class<C> mockBeanType;
    protected MockBeanFactory(){}

    protected  <C> C create(Class<C> mockClass) {
        return Mockit.newEmptyProxy(mockClass);
    }

    @Override
    public C getObject() throws Exception {
        return create(mockBeanType);
    }

    @Override
    public Class<C> getObjectType() {
        return mockBeanType;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isSingleton() {
        return true;
    }

    public static class MetaFactory {
        public <C> MockBeanFactory<C> createFactory(Class<C> mockBeanType) {
            MockBeanFactory<C> factory = new MockBeanFactory<C>();
            factory.mockBeanType = mockBeanType;
            return factory;
        }
    }
}

And then in the Spring context XML file, you just can simply create the meta factory that creates the specific bean-type factories:

<bean id="metaFactory" class="com.stackoverflow.MockBeanFactory$MetaFactory"/>

<bean factory-bean="metaFactory" factory-method="createFactory">
    <constructor-arg name="mockBeanType" value="com.stackoverflow.YourService"/>
</bean>

To make this work for the original asker's situation, it could be tweaked to make the FactoryBeans into wrappers/adapter for the serviceFactoryBean:

public class FancyFactoryAdapter<C> implements FactoryBean<C> {

    private Class<C> clientClass;
    private FancyFactory serviceFactoryBean;

    protected FancyFactoryAdapter(){}

    @Override
    public C getObject() throws Exception {
        return serviceFactoryBean.buildService(clientClass);
    }

    @Override
    public Class<C> getObjectType() {
        return clientClass;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isSingleton() {
        return true;
    }

    public static class MetaFactory {

        @Autowired FancyFactory serviceFactoryBean;

        public <C> FancyFactoryAdapter<C> createFactory(Class<C> clientClass) {
            FancyFactoryAdapter<C> factory = new FancyFactoryAdapter<C>();
            factory.clientClass = clientClass;
            factory.serviceFactoryBean = serviceFactoryBean;
            return factory;
        }
    }
}

Then in the XML (notice the userServiceFactory id and the userService bean id are necessary only to work with the @Qualifier annotation):

<bean id="metaFactory" class="com.stackoverflow.FancyFactoryAdapter$MetaFactory"/>

<bean id="userServiceFactory" factory-bean="metaFactory" factory-method="createFactory">
    <constructor-arg name="clientClass" value="com.captain.services.UserServiceInterface"/>
</bean>

<bean id="userService" factory-bean="userServiceFactory"/>

<bean id="scoreServiceFactory" factory-bean="metaFactory" factory-method="createFactory">
    <constructor-arg name="clientClass" value="com.captain.services.ScoreServiceInterface"/>
</bean>

<bean id="scoreService" factory-bean="scoreServiceFactory"/>

And that's it, just one little Java class and a smidge of boiler-plate configuration and your custom bean factory can create all of your beans and have Spring resolve them successfully.

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2  
I'm upvoting this mostly because this is Java and therefore a FactoryFactory object is always correct! –  Brandon Yarbrough Sep 9 '12 at 23:17
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You should be able to achieve this using:

<bean id="myCreatedObjectBean" class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.MethodInvokingFactoryBean">
    <property name="targetClass">
        <value>com.mycompany.MyFactoryClass</value>
    </property>
    <property name="targetMethod">
        <value>myFactoryMethod</value>
    </property>
</bean>

Then you can use either @Resource or @Autowired + @Qualifier to inject into your object directly.

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