Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hey I am trying to appendChild() two consecutive div's but what I am expecting as result is for them to be side by side, but they are one on top of the other like so:

1st div
2nd div

instead of 1st div 2nd div

var addBudContainer = document.createElement("div");
addBudContainer.id = "addBudContainer";

var addBudBtn = document.createElement("div");
addBudBtn.className = "addBud";

var addBudBtnName = document.createElement("a");
addBudBtnName.className = "btn-addBud";
addBudBtnName.setAttribute("href","#");

addBudBtn.appendChild(addBudBtnName);

var addBudTxt = document.createElement("input");
addBudTxt.id="addBudTxt";
addBudTxt.type="text";
addBudTxt.defaultValue="Enter buddy name";
//txt box effects   
addBudTxt.onfocus = function(){if(replyTxt.value==replyTxt.defaultValue) replyTxt.value='';};
addBudTxt.onblur= function(){if(replyTxt.value=='') replyTxt.value=replyTxt.defaultValue;};

addBudContainer.appendChild(addBudBtn);
addBudContainer.appendChild(addBudTxt);
share|improve this question
1  
How about showing some actual code? We're not (very) psychic. –  Matt Ball Jan 31 '11 at 2:55
    
@Matt Awesome avatar! –  ClosureCowboy Jan 31 '11 at 3:02

3 Answers 3

You may have better results with <span> instead of <div> if you want the elements to be laid out in-line rather than as separate blocks.

share|improve this answer

You can also add the "float: left" CSS property to the DIVs, which will cause them to stack up side by side on the left until they've filled up the available width of the enclosing element.

share|improve this answer

By default, <div> elements are "block" elements. In simple terms, this means that a <div> will be on its own line (or lines) within its parent element.

<span> elements by default are "inline", which might be what you want to use. Inline elements don't push their sibling elements onto other lines.

If you want to override this behavior, you can using CSS.

/* This assumes the parent element of your divs has 'some_class' as its class */
.some_class > div {
  display: inline;
}

Edit: I added the optional separator semicolon after display: inline.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Closure Why not display:inline-block or float? –  Šime Vidas Jan 31 '11 at 3:03
    
@Sime Vidas: inline-block is not fully supported across all browsers. IE is particularly bad. –  Alastair Pitts Jan 31 '11 at 3:04
    
@Alastair Let's not drag other browsers into this. IE6 and IE7 are the only browsers that don't support it. –  Šime Vidas Jan 31 '11 at 3:06
3  
@Matt One can leave out the semi colon on the last property declaration –  Šime Vidas Jan 31 '11 at 3:07
    
@Šime: I didn't know that. Even if it's true, that sounds like an awful practice, that not even the YUI minifier uses... –  Matt Ball Jan 31 '11 at 3:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.